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Has anyone had a lorry transported? Is it hi - NOW BODGE 50 HORSEBO11OX THREAD (Now with added turtles)

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9 minutes ago, cort1977 said:

Bostik flash band will quieten down larger panels that resonate. 

The marine stuff with the metal layer is good but heavy.  Might be best for engine and transmission cover.

Second that, I've used this on camper van projects to pad out panels, floors and roof areas and it works surprisingly well.

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It definitely helped in my van - though as soon as we got the 30C weather nonsense last year it peeled off the vertical surfaces I'd put it on...but should be fine for the floor.

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For the carpet, cut along the top and bottom curve of the vertical bit of the moulded bit in the middle.  If you cut from the bulkhead edge where the vertical curves join in a point, you should find that you have a big flat piece for the floor, a smaller flat piece for the top of the cover, and a weird Chesire Cat smile shaped piece that wraps around.  To remake, you basically take these pattern pieces, add a bit extra material  to the edges, and sew along what were the cut curves.  If you add up to an inch to the edge all the carpet pieces you should avoid any issues with the carpet being too short around the edges and can trim it back to suit.

You can also make the hump separately from the main floor section if you prefer, and attached the carpet and sound proofing directly to the hump so that piece can be removed without lifting the whole carpet, should you need to.  If you use a rubber backed carpet generally you don't need to worry about frayed edges, if frayed edges are a concern you can buy various different sorts of edge binding that you simply sew on, you just have to be fairly accurate with that if you want a nice fit.

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That makes a lot of sense Vulg. I reckon if you cut out the Cheshire cat section, then cut a replacement for it which was the same shape but twice as wide, and stitched that back in, you'd have a pretty good fit. Have you any experience of stitching this carpet? I think it's gel backed stuff. Can you just stitch two bits of it together? What would you use for thread?

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1 hour ago, vulgalour said:

For the carpet, cut along the top and bottom curve of the vertical bit of the moulded bit in the middle.  If you cut from the bulkhead edge where the vertical curves join in a point, you should find that you have a big flat piece for the floor, a smaller flat piece for the top of the cover, and a weird Chesire Cat smile shaped piece that wraps around.  To remake, you basically take these pattern pieces, add a bit extra material  to the edges, and sew along what were the cut curves.  If you add up to an inch to the edge all the carpet pieces you should avoid any issues with the carpet being too short around the edges and can trim it back to suit.

You can also make the hump separately from the main floor section if you prefer, and attached the carpet and sound proofing directly to the hump so that piece can be removed without lifting the whole carpet, should you need to.  If you use a rubber backed carpet generally you don't need to worry about frayed edges, if frayed edges are a concern you can buy various different sorts of edge binding that you simply sew on, you just have to be fairly accurate with that if you want a nice fit.

This reads like a post of experience! 

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It looks like the original flooring is a moulded rubber piece with foam glued on the back?  If so, you can use puncture repair kit stuff to repair it in the same way you would a puncture.  You can also buy sheets of neoprene for things like boat decking which is a bit more malleable than carpet.  There's a lot of options for a flooring solution, but I don't think sewing what you've got is going to be one of them. If you perforate a rubber flooring it has a habit of tearing, sewing obviously makes the risk of tearing incredibly high.   Repairing old rubber floors is a bit of a nuisance, it can be done, it's just tricky to do right.

Having had another look at the shapes, the Chesire Cat bit (proper technical terms here) doesn't look that deep so you can probably do a no-sew carpet.  If you do the larger part of the floor in one piece, cut to butt up to all the edges, that will deal with the majority.  For the raised section, if you make a piece that is bigger that the top plateau and has triangular slots cut at the corners, the carpet should then 'drape' and conform to the shape you want.  Do a trial with some cardboard first.  Also, if you made this raised section piece slightly larger than it needs to be, the big floor carpet would overlap and hold it in place, giving a nice tidy edge.  You can then use contact adhesive and fabric on the back of the raised section's cut corners to hold the carpet together.  It's not necessarily a professional way of doing it, but it will work and is cheap that way.

Third option isn't going to be as pretty but might suit your needs.  Cut one large floor piece in carpet that doesn't include the raised section. Keep the original rubber raised section and repair/strengthen the tears with rubber cement and flattened out inner tube rubber.  The repairs should be mostly invisible when the rubber is refitted.  This again gives the two-piece advantage that you can remove the middle bit without removing the whole carpet, reducing the need to handle the rubber and the risk of it disintegrating.

There's so many solutions to the flooring on this one, it's a case of finding what fits your patience, budget, and desired end result best.

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Yo Vulg, yeah I wasnt thinking of trying to stitch the existing rubber mat which is defo toast. I was thinking more about how to join the sections of the new carpet if I made a new cheshire cat piece. I think the carpet has a smooth gel-like side and a hairy side. Presumably you can't go gluing the carpet together as any glue on the hairy side is gonna look a mess and probably not stick at all, and you can't stick smooth side to smooth side as you'll have the hairy side facing downwards somewhere right? Maybe to join the carpet as you say you have to find some hefty fabric tape of some sort and glue, or I did see some 100mm wide gaffa tape on eBay which might work perhaps.

Hefty fabric tape:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-METRE-ROLL-4-100mm-NATURAL-BEIGE-WEBBING-CARPET-BINDING-RUG-EDGING-CRAFT/251285986884

s-l1600.jpg

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Yeah, that should work for a no-sew approach.  It'll be a bit fiddly, but if you do one seam at a time you should manage it.  If you use a fabric tape and contact adhesive the tape should have the movement it needs to stop the glue coming unstuck.  The problem with gaffer is it goes brittle and doesn't stretch or shrink that well so it doesn't last as long.  The ideal is to sew the carpet pieces together on a machine, If that's not an option and you hate yourself enough, you can do it by hand.

If I were using that fabric tape you linked, I'd glue one edge on to one piece so it's a 50% overlap of the tape.  Once that's set, I'd then glue the other edge of the tape so your carpet butts up on the tape.  It should make a practically invisible seam, it'll just take a while to do.  You can then always go back and sew through the carpet and tape to reinforce the glue bond, though not every machine will tolerate you doing this.

There is always the option of using velcro tape.  I'd recommend using actual Velcro branded tape as it's much stronger than the generic offerings usually.  That way you stick the fuzzy side of the tape to the floor and the hook side to the carpet.  It might work since you're not dealing with very complicated shapes or a lot of depth and you don't need to faff with contact adhesive and sewing machines.  Long term I don't really know how that would hold up, it's just something I've tried short term on small items and lasted reasonably well for a few months as a temporary solution.

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In addition to Vulg's advice...

Years ago, I did a mate's Transit for him, with foam backed kitchen carpet: I used the mega strength double sided tape you get in B+Q, so that once I'd rough cut the carpet oversize (as above), I could batter it into the angles and corners with a brick bolster and mallet. Conventional knee kickers were too long to be usable, but even my modest mass was enough to hold it still. Then, it was a case of lifting the carpet enough to fit the tape, and trimming. 

I did leave the odd lip here and there ( like behind the pedals for example) so that the dirt deposited on it over time could be contained. Makes it easier to give the cab a quick sweep up. Joins can be 'hidden' with the old valeter's bodge of gently filling up with colour matched spray paint and bashing it in with a stiff brush.

Matey's Transit wouldn't have got me a job at Bentley either, but as it was his race car tug/workshop/doss house, it was good enough. 

Further back in time, I have fond memories of a local farmer using the earlier Dodge version for his milk float. Hanging off the back of that as it chugged along at 40mph at 4 in the morning was...unforgettable! 

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16 hours ago, vulgalour said:

Yeah, that should work for a no-sew approach.  It'll be a bit fiddly, but if you do one seam at a time you should manage it.  If you use a fabric tape and contact adhesive the tape should have the movement it needs to stop the glue coming unstuck.  The problem with gaffer is it goes brittle and doesn't stretch or shrink that well so it doesn't last as long.  The ideal is to sew the carpet pieces together on a machine, If that's not an option and you hate yourself enough, you can do it by hand.

If I were using that fabric tape you linked, I'd glue one edge on to one piece so it's a 50% overlap of the tape.  Once that's set, I'd then glue the other edge of the tape so your carpet butts up on the tape.  It should make a practically invisible seam, it'll just take a while to do.  You can then always go back and sew through the carpet and tape to reinforce the glue bond, though not every machine will tolerate you doing this.

There is always the option of using velcro tape.  I'd recommend using actual Velcro branded tape as it's much stronger than the generic offerings usually.  That way you stick the fuzzy side of the tape to the floor and the hook side to the carpet.  It might work since you're not dealing with very complicated shapes or a lot of depth and you don't need to faff with contact adhesive and sewing machines.  Long term I don't really know how that would hold up, it's just something I've tried short term on small items and lasted reasonably well for a few months as a temporary solution.

Just carpet the whole van in the fuzzy side of sticky velcro! Then you can pretend you've got a swanky new Ford with a carpet you can never hoover bits out of... 

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On 5/2/2020 at 9:11 PM, Mr_Bo11ox said:

Blimey!!! I too will show my arse on the town hall steps if that sale actually goes through. 

Shock horror, you can keep your trousers up.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/174274849769?ViewItem=&item=17427484976

Wasn't relisted after that so it may actually have been sold?

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Loving the repair to the floor when the column goes through. The whole lot in blue looks brill.

had to laugh at your comment ref nuts and bolts.  Reminded me and my Dad had several big tins.  A first token rummage often yielded nowt.  So then the whole fekking tin got up ended.  Given the qty available, generally a match was secured.  One was only Bolluxed if you wanted a set of matching, always at least one short.

why do they never fit back in tin.  I now know this to be Dom’s law, once you’ve had the lid off, it is difficult to put it back on

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4 hours ago, Isaac Hunt said:

Loving the repair to the floor when the column goes through. The whole lot in blue looks brill.

had to laugh at your comment ref nuts and bolts.  Reminded me and my Dad had several big tins.  A first token rummage often yielded nowt.  So then the whole fekking tin got up ended.  Given the qty available, generally a match was secured.  One was only Bolluxed if you wanted a set of matching, always at least one short.

why do they never fit back in tin.  I now know this to be Dom’s law, once you’ve had the lid off, it is difficult to put it back on

My mate did the same, but with a big tray when we rebuilt his land rover on the road outside his house one summer. 

How we laughed*as he kicked it over one day and tipped half of them down the drain... 

He ended up just buying a better engine than his when that happened... And new bulkhead bolts

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11 hours ago, beko1987 said:

Just carpet the whole van in the fuzzy side of sticky velcro! Then you can pretend you've got a swanky new Ford with a carpet you can never hoover bits out of... 

and buy something good off beko ?

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