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vulgalour

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vulgalour last won the day on December 12 2020

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    Mucking Fental

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    United Kingdom

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Rank: Matra Rancho towing a Tagora

Rank: Matra Rancho towing a Tagora (12/12)

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  1. Maybe it's two VWs. Take a Mk1 Polo/Audi 80 and stick a chopped up VW 1600 on top. Extend/shorten where required to make your very own... Sunbeam Alpine? Aston Martin? replica.
  2. Finally, both Maestro wheel arches are now done. The time it's spent on the driveway waiting for me to put new rear arches on it is probably the longest its ever spent off the road in its entire life. Is it a perfect profile and exactly as it left the factory in 1988? No. Is it close enough? Yeah, absolutely.
  3. New video time. Find some spectacular artistry this time around. The wing I removed is practically art.
  4. Fortunately, I've used one of these things before and perfect is something that happens to other people, so we're good.
  5. A friend visited in his not-quite-shabby pre-facelift Rover R8 today (I totally failed to get a photo, I'll have to see if I can get a copy of the ones I he snapped) to deliver a really nice polishing machine from another friend. Now I want to polish ALL THE THINGS. I'm going to start with the Maestro since I literally cannot make the paint on it look any worse than it already does.
  6. I'm sorry for your sunburn. I'm not so sorry I found the story amusing.
  7. It is done, finally. I'm happier with the arch shape on the other side of the car, the side I did using two front wings. This side the arch shape just seems... off. Amusingly, this is the side I used proper repair panels on and while the bodylines and door shut pressing lined up, I've had no end of trouble getting the arch to be in the right place and needed to do a lot more jiggery pokery to make it all work. Still, it's done now and it's good enough. All steel instead of rust and filler and a sock. When it's not raining I'll do the filler work (no filler in it yet) that's needed to smooth it all out and get some nice shiny red paint thrown on. Bumper corner will make a reappearance when it's all painted too. Then I can go through and do all the MoT prep I need to and get this thing booked in. If I hadn't run out of gas, and then money, this would have been done a lot sooner. Thank goodness for the neighbour that gave me a bottle of Co2/Argon that he'd had sat in his shed for the better part of 20 years unused, because that's given me enough to do some of the welding the Princess needs too without costing me a penny.
  8. I regret to inform you this is the support group. Now, when are you doing a collection thread?
  9. Nah, right vehicle for the job, just chuck em in the back and stick an octopus net over the top to stop them falling out.
  10. Could it be? Have I found a solution that works? Parker Knoll type springs do hook onto the original diaphragm hooks nicely. I'm going to have to make a panel to keep the springs aligned and add some support to the foam, but I already have some good thick canvas that should do very nicely for that job. The only issue on a test sit has been that the springs are softer than the original diaphragm so the seat does bucket a bit *but* that will be counteracted by the canvas panel I'm putting in since the foam won't be able to push down and spread the springs apart so much... at least in theory. Time will tell if third time really is the charm in trying to solve the collapsed seat base issue.
  11. Have a little break and come back at it fresh. I tend to use 0.6mm on bodywork because 0.8mm has a habit of burning through too easily, so if you were getting on fine with .8 it's probably worth going back to that if you can. I did have issues with some welding tips a few years ago that were supposed to be .6mm, gave up with them and bought some more because of spitting, poor wire feed, and the fact they seemed to clog up really fast so that might be what you're getting as an issue here. It could also just be that your welder is being a tart, they do be like that.
  12. I'll see what I can do. Honestly, I'm beyond done with this particular job and wish I'd never started it. I just want to throw some money at someone and have the car back all working and sorted.
  13. @Rocket88yes, same result. Thing is, nothing changed between putting the car away when the lights worked and getting it out today when they didn't. Also, the wiper motor will only run when power is supplied directly rather than off the switch as it did before (dashboard out job to get to the switch). On the plus side, the semaphores at least work like they should. @dozeydustman Switch has been bench tested and proved totally reliable, all functions operate as they should. Indeed, it's getting power where power should be. The issue comes in when you try and get things to work together and that doesn't really make any sense at all. You can get the light unit to light up if you provide power directly. We've got a healthy amount of volts getting to the light unit. We've got good continuity where it should be and nice good earths. The trouble is as soon as you put any of it together, the rear lights just won't work. It makes no sense at all. Personally, I reckon the wiring is quitting time now. Time to get someone else in with some experience. We're not making any progress.
  14. Today, you may be correct in that assertion. Pat and I have spent some time today trying to figure out why the rear lights aren't working. Fuses - both good Earth points - all good Power supply to wire ends- all good, and healthy Battery condition - fully charged and healthy Bulbs - in perfect working order You'd expect, therefore, that everything would be fine, right? Nope. Even though it all checks out as perfectly functional, the rear lights refuse to turn on. On the plus side, we know the wiring for the stop/brake function is good but that the brake switch seems to be iffy. The brake switch isn't the cause of the rear lights not working though, we isolated it from the system and still nada even though everything checks out as perfectly normal and good.
  15. It's theoretically sound except for one issue which is the width. The retaining hooks would end up so long you'd not have much supporting the foam where they were and they'd end up cutting into the foam seat base. You might be able to use a sheet of fabric to reduce this but it's not ideal and I'd have to make 20 hooks from scratch. Cableties are the last resort option for me on this one, it's not a solution I want to pursue as I'd far rather the seats feel as close to original as possible, it's one of the things I really like about the Princess. Other considerations are the zig-zag springs used in upholstery with the ends bent to go into the hook slots and a sheet of fabric to protect the foam, or non-rubber upholstery webbing that I can fold over and sew the ends of to hold the metal rods in place. They're really just variations of the cabletie solution though, so they're not what I want to do. I'm keeping an eye out for a spare Princess front seat so I can do some testing and try and find a solution since I would like to know how to DIY a seat diaphragm in case it's a job I need to do on a future project. EDIT: on looking at spring options I found a listing for Parker Knoll style seat base springs. I know these work for household upholstery and they work long term. They do a 13 1/2" spring which is the correct length for what I need (diaphragm is 15", you need 1-2" shorter spring than the width to avoid sagginess) so I'm going to give those a try. The loops on the end of the springs will hook straight onto the hooks that hold the diaphragm and I can use a sheet of vinyl glued to the base of the foam to prevent wear from the springs. Also, the springs have a sheath so they don't pinch when going from stretched to compressed. The seat won't feel exactly the same, but it could be an easy fix and a lot easier to install than the original diaphragm.
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