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All about that BASE - Rover 820 END


dollywobbler

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What are your driving impressions DW?

 

The Mk1 fastback is a very handsome car and my Mk2 825D was one of the comfiest cars I've driven. I don't know how an 800 would suit a 2.0 carb engine.

 

Just had another run out in it, because the day after collection is always an informative drive I find.

 

The autochoke is hilariously shit, so the first mile or so is interesting. It is very comfortable, although the ride has some fidget to it - blame Honda for that and their insistence that double-wishbone short-travel suspension is ideal for an executive car...

 

It's fairly quiet, though the engine drones a bit. Needs working hard to make progress, but not really any point in revving beyond 4000rpm. Gearchange is usually precise, but fifth occasionally proves hard to find. Nice stalks. 

 

Handling is interesting. Initial turn in is good, but it seems to take a long time for the rear end to cotton on to the direction change. It feels far too soft back there, and it can get surprisingly wallowy. I suspect this is because Rover was trying to get comfort out of a suspension design not ideal for it. 

 

It's nice and relaxing to drive, or will be once I get the brakes working properly...

 

If the sunroof is leaking, it isn't leaking onto my head, so it's fine.

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I almost feel that the 316i I now have is like the German equivalent to this.

 

Sounds like you might need rear shocks, DW. The 316 wallowed hilariously until I replaced them.

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DW - when I wound the calipers back in on the Saab the other week I used a pair of needle nosed pliers as the cube thing I'd got from Halfrauds didn't fit the piston's notches. Need to push in as you turn and can make your hand a little hurty if it's not playing ball.

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Why not just strip and clean the calipers? The bit that usually makes them stick is corrosion to the piston bore on the outside of the seal.....this corrodes and pinches the piston. Slip the seal out first and clean this bit

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G-Clamp for piston rewind-ness (never failed me) and if you want to go further, a small block of wood between the clamp end and the piston to balance out the pressure applied to the piston. 

 

I'd start with that and have all the calipers off and pressing the brakes to have the pistons out and wind the pistons in a few times.

 

As for tyres - https://www.blackcircles.com/

 

Sunroof.....are you really going to tidy that up? ;)

 

Whats she like underneath underneath? (yes did mean to say that twice)

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Great looking car. Did you need any Haynes manuals for this? I’ve got the 800 one, and also a Montego 2.0 one for the engine. The 800 one doesn’t deign to cover the carb model - there’s base snobbery for you.

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Great looking car. Did you need any Haynes manuals for this? I’ve got the 800 one, and also a Montego 2.0 one for the engine. The 800 one doesn’t deign to cover the carb model - there’s base snobbery for you.

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If ity has seen a caravan on that towbar, the rear suspension will be mullered I would guess, saggy springs and tired dampers

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you can buy a pukka caliper wind back tool for about £15, a bit fiddly but worth having if you are doing this job!!!! I's say just exercising the calipers has a 75% chance of solving your problems. just pump the piston 3/4 out, squirt a load of WD under the rubber boot, and wind it back in with the tool, repeat a couple of times then reassemble. Had to do this every year on that old 220SLi.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sealey-Rear-Brake-Calipers-Brake-Piston-Wind-Back-Tool-with-Double-Adaptor-VS024/192487389396

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Right. Let's catch up.

 

Why not just strip and clean the calipers? The bit that usually makes them stick is corrosion to the piston bore on the outside of the seal.....this corrodes and pinches the piston. Slip the seal out first and clean this bit

 

That is indeed the plan for tomorrow. Have begged the use of a four-post lift, so that'll make life easier. Also plan to replace the brake fluid.

 

interior lights are above doors like in the back of a vectra

 

They are indeed. They don't work.

 

G-Clamp for piston rewind-ness (never failed me) and if you want to go further, a small block of wood between the clamp end and the piston to balance out the pressure applied to the piston. 

 

I'd start with that and have all the calipers off and pressing the brakes to have the pistons out and wind the pistons in a few times.

 

As for tyres - https://www.blackcircles.com/

 

Sunroof.....are you really going to tidy that up? ;)

 

Whats she like underneath underneath? (yes did mean to say that twice)

 

I have it on good authority that these pistons really shouldn't be pushed back, or it buggers the caliper up. I've not been underneath underneath...

 

Great looking car. Did you need any Haynes manuals for this? I’ve got the 800 one, and also a Montego 2.0 one for the engine. The 800 one doesn’t deign to cover the carb model - there’s base snobbery for you.

 

Yes to both please!

 

you can buy a pukka caliper wind back tool for about £15, a bit fiddly but worth having if you are doing this job!!!! I's say just exercising the calipers has a 75% chance of solving your problems. just pump the piston 3/4 out, squirt a load of WD under the rubber boot, and wind it back in with the tool, repeat a couple of times then reassemble. Had to do this every year on that old 220SLi.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sealey-Rear-Brake-Calipers-Brake-Piston-Wind-Back-Tool-with-Double-Adaptor-VS024/192487389396

 

I wouldn't use WD, for fear it'd destroy the rubber. That said, the one I inspected was already slightly torn. Tomorrow's plan is to strip and lube as best I can and see if that improves matters. 

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There is something special about base model rovers. Even povo spec cars have a certain decadence about them that base model granada's did'nt have.

 

My 2 litre SD1 was a heap but passengers thought it was a limo - like the car in this thread motorway driving was a noisy affair - booming from the engine and "chatter" from the manual box that is even mentioned in the haynes manual.

 

We take the piss out of British motor manufacturing but the 800 was well ahead of it's time.

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Hey that's a fantastic buy there. I didn't actually know what to expect from the 800 until I bought one but your summary is about right, although my current 820 feels a lot tighter and better made than the older example I had recently.

 

Definitely vouch for the comfort of the seats. I've got mine adjusted perfectly (that's half the battle) and it's sublime.

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Just watched the video, this is excellent.  I had an 827 Vitesse once, and although the engine was gr9 and very addictive I bet the O-series is more than adequate.  Plus the cloth seats are probably more comfortable.

 

Edit: just found a pic.  Bloody hell it was five years ago, how time flies.

 

post-5013-0-17763600-1554844962_thumb.jpg

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Drat. Keep forgetting to take a photo of the engine. It's hilariously ancient. A bit like removing the cover on an iMac to find a BBC home computer inside it. 

 

Today, I drove over 100 miles to do this.

D3t3jUxWsAE6O8t.jpg

 

Use a lift so I could strip the brakes and assess. Not much photo content I'm afraid, but some greasing and cleaning seemed to result in a car that actually stopped. The nearside rear caliper was still binding though, but then someone local to where I was offered a pair of home-refurbed MGF calipers. That did the trick.

 

Pedal is still shite though - we think because of tired flexis. The master cylinder seems to hold pressure, but the pedal still has a long travel on first application, but firms up if you're quick with a second push. It's certainly a lot better, as I actually got the ABS to kick on on dry tarmac, but it surely can't be right. So, new flexis to be ordered.

 

Eventually got back home. 430 miles since Sunday, 31mpg, still probably 300 miles to do before the first week of ownership is up...

D3vKUs_XsAI0wBk.jpg

 

Interior trim rattles are starting to annoy now. Even the seatbelt squeaks. FFS! Also, I had the wipers on intermittent this morning, but they just decided they'd had enough after a while and parked themselves (which they do off the bottom of the windscreen). But, it's comfortable and quite joyous to drive. The engine makes suitably lusty noises.

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If you need it, we've got about 50 new old stock Unipart full master cylinder kits (inc new pistons etc) at work for these. Sure we've got new hoses as well.

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I bet this is fantastic to drive, I'd love a shot in it.

 

Fuggin' likewise.  I keep coming back to this thread and getting all hot under the collar.  Mk1 Rover 800s do that to me!

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