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E10 checker tool


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3 hours ago, LabRat said:

 

That's... Useful. My local mg dealership doesn't even know what an mg6 is, let alone find any info in the owners manual!

I'm hazarding a guess that, since it's essentially a k series, that would be a no then.

 

FYI, MG6 in various other market are compatible up to E85. Is there any difference between those markets and the UK one? Who knows!

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Aluminum I've not had problems with.

Cheap rustproofing (zinc etc) over steel rapidly turns to powder and falls off, however.

Any rubber component not designed for the ethanol (plus all the other stabilizers that get pumped in to stabilize the ethanol) will work for a while then turn either to putty or to jelly depending on the type of rubber involved.

Vapor locking is a major problem with non E0 fuel.

You can't store it. It degrades, even in a sealed plastic container. Best lifespan I've had from E10 is about 6 months before it starts making the engine run lumpy.

It has overall better knock characteristics, I can advance the timing a fair bit on the Pontiac on E10 compared to E0.

Is it any good? In a modern engine designed for it, yes. Older vehicles? No. Even an older car with rubber designed to be compatible that's seen nothing but E0 for three decades is going to deteriorate quickly on it.

 

This is all based on experience, not Internet bullshit.

 

Phil

 

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9 hours ago, Six-cylinder said:

That is why there is a pitch fork on the fuel cap to keep out E10!

P1100054 crop fuel cap broad.jpg

No, that's the symbol of the device you're bum raped with when you have to buy spares! My 430 4v always felt like a £45k car (in 1994) with a £44.5k drivetrain, the rest was a monumental PoS!☹️

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I'm happy to change the rubber connections in fuel lines to compatible marine stuff as someone recommended before.  The Vauxhall Viva gets so little use that I'm already wondering about an electric fuel pump to be able to empty the tank anyway, then bung the fuel in something else when it goes for a rest for a few months. 

I was thinking about converting it to lpg but I can hardly get it round here anyway. 

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6 hours ago, Spiny Norman said:

So they're not listing Rover or MG but if this is taken at face value it suggests the K series, or the 1.8 version fitted to the Freelander at least, is good to go.

Screenshot_2021-02-25 GOV UK - The best place to find government services and information.png

That bodes well for the KV6, too.

And, by extension of that, and with considerable clutching of straws... The Kia Sedona was available with a KV6 prior to 2005, and:

kia.thumb.jpg.49e4d7670d64fb9ba12fd187a4a49ef2.jpg

Nevertheless, I think I'll stick with Super Unleaded just to be on the safe side.

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5 hours ago, PhilA said:

You can't store it. It degrades, even in a sealed plastic container. Best lifespan I've had from E10 is about 6 months before it starts making the engine run lumpy.

Do you reckon the hot and humid weather you have over there doesn't help too?

The fuel I drained out of the Dolomite is probably at least 2 years old now. I put some in it when I bought it and there was already some in there. It had been sitting for a good few months when I bought it too. So old fuel of unknown vintage. Probably a mix of E0 and E5. The bottom lot was proper manky though with rusty water in. But water may have got in through the petrol cap too. Both the Briggs and Honda powered garden machinery seem happy to run off it though.

Have been debating whether to try it in the 1100. Might be more trouble than it's worth though, given rough running in that is more of an inconvenience than the garden equipment. Got 25 litres of the petrol to get through. Plus another 5 litres from last season. 

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3 minutes ago, SiC said:

Do you reckon the hot and humid weather you have over there doesn't help too? 

That very much has a lot to do with it, but it takes a few months to get that "left outside on a farm in Worcester for a decade" smell to it when it's burned (to me, it smells almost like ground white pepper like you used to get at Little Chef).

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15 hours ago, SiC said:

I bet it'll probably be fine on many other cars not mentioned or tested (e.g. Rover). 

If you look under Honda, it specifically mentions that cars with PGM-FI, Honda's fuel injection system introduced in the late 80s with the advent of the D-Series, are E10 safe. 

That includes all Honda engined Rovers - R8 216/416, some early HH-R 400s, most 600s , and the mk1 825/7 with the Honda V6. 


RELIABLE HONDA ENGINE. 

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5 hours ago, Ghosty said:

If you look under Honda, it specifically mentions that cars with PGM-FI, Honda's fuel injection system introduced in the late 80s with the advent of the D-Series, are E10 safe. 

That includes all Honda engined Rovers - R8 216/416, some early HH-R 400s, most 600s , and the mk1 825/7 with the Honda V6. 


RELIABLE HONDA ENGINE. 

That's a relief!

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Remember, all this confusion and anxiety to reduce car emissions by 6%...
Worth it?

That's a lot. I didn't know it was that much. A lot especially considering manufacturers spend an awful lot of effort to reduce emissions by fractions of a percentage. All the easy wins that the manufacturers can do have been taken.

Remember that the vast majority of vehicles on the road right now will be unaffected by this change. Only a few older, soon to be EOL vehicles. No wonder the government have taken this decision.

Got a source/reference for that 6% reduction?
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7 minutes ago, SiC said:


That's a lot. I didn't know it was that much. A lot especially considering manufacturers spend an awful lot of effort to reduce emissions by fractions of a percentage. All the easy wins that the manufacturers can do have been taken.

Remember that the vast majority of vehicles on the road right now will be unaffected by this change. Only a few older, soon to be EOL vehicles. No wonder the government have taken this decision.

Got a source/reference for that 6% reduction?

My apologies I seem to have got my wires crossed over figures. The 6% was from a predicted reduction of CO2 emissions due to covid. According to the source below its to reduce emissions from transport by 2%. 

https://www.cenex.co.uk/news/incoming-e10-petrol-a-stepping-stone-to-zero-emission-vehicles/#:~:text=Using E10 petrol (10% bioethanol mix) instead of,to taking 350%2C000 cars off the UK roads.

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All Volvo’s from 76 on (except one S/V40 variant) apparently can use E10 so that’s the 740 safe then!

The Capri and Transit probably not, and the Mercury probably not too but it’s not listed. On those I’ll try to stick to the E0 or E5 stuff or just mix in some of that ethanol stabiliser stuff you can buy usually sold mixed with lead replacement additives etc. 
Ive got marine grade fuel hoses on the Capri already though so that part of the problem should be sorted.

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2 hours ago, brownnova said:

Hang on... Yugo isn’t listed... anyone got the number for Zastava so I can check with them please? 
 

My Saab is ok apparently, but the 2CVs will have to have the stealth tax on classic cars applied... 

The engines are Fiat derived, so I'd imagine looking up engines for Fiats from the 70s all the way up to the Panda will give you a broad enough outlook.

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18 hours ago, Conan said:

FYI, MG6 in various other market are compatible up to E85. Is there any difference between those markets and the UK one? Who knows!

The only thing about the MG6's K-Series engine is that SAIC redesigned some of it to create the N-Series. As far as I know, this redesign stretched only as far as head gaskets, block bolts and something else. 

I think the best bet for us K-Series apologists is to trust what Land Rover said regarding their petrol engines. 

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20 hours ago, artdjones said:

I'm sure that is happening, but in North America it's mainly made from maize or wheat.

Another awkward question.If many millions of cars expire prematurely worldwide, how do the environmental costs of recycling and replacing them compare to the environmental benefits of using E10?

I suspect they don't give a fuck as they're expecting you to go electric in the next 10 or so years anyway.

I wonder if the cars are rated good to go on E10 are being given the green on the basis that they only need to do 10 years/ 200,000 miles...

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22 hours ago, artdjones said:

Has anyone explained how using farmland to make fuel is a good idea when the population increases every year and there's so much malnutrition in the world.

Bioethanol is made from biomass - the cuttings, leaves, stalks etc left over AFTER the edible bits have been removed (if the edible bits are inedible (rotten, pest ridden etc) they can be used as well, rather than thrown away). The biomass is digested using, for example, enzymes which break the complex carbohydrates (eg cellulose and lignin - the woody bits) into sugars which are fermented to produce the alcohol.

Sugar derived bioethanol needs less processing as, obvs, there's a lot of sugar already present.

I'm not saying that all bioethanol is a by-product of food production, because it isn't and crops are grown specifically for fuel (eg quick growing willow), but a significant proportion is.

 

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Only car in the fleet which is cleared to run on E10 is the C2, which probably won't be staying long term anyway.

Renault 6 should be OK for a while as most of the fuel line is steel, there's only a short section of rubber hose to the carb inlet which should be cheap enough to replace with marine grade shiz.  Looks like I'm going to have to run the others on Super though - the Volvo needs Super anyway and the Innocenti sips fuel so it doesn't really matter what I put in that, but the Toyota is going to be a bit of a pain.

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22 hours ago, artdjones said:

Another awkward question.If many millions of cars expire prematurely worldwide, how do the environmental costs of recycling and replacing them compare to the environmental benefits of using E10?

Probably not very well.  That isn't really the purpose of the exercise though.  The purpose is really to keep the Extinction Rebellion types quiet, and those types don't tend to think things through too thoroughly.

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1 hour ago, wuvvum said:

Probably not very well.  That isn't really the purpose of the exercise though.  The purpose is really to keep the Extinction Rebellion types quiet, and those types don't tend to think things through too thoroughly.

Why do I get the feeling that XR types seem exclusively drawn from the ranks of the comfortably off with too much time on their hands?

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