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Guest Message by DevFuse
 

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It is just so Super (Sentinel).

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65 replies to this topic

#61 OFFLINE   406V6

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 09:46 AM

Fantastic stuff. I'm in awe of quality heavy engineering like this.

 

The thread title could do with an update - dropping in the works Sentinel and steam wagon - as it's easy to miss.


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2000 Peugeot 406 GTX V6 auto saloon


#62 OFFLINE   JimH

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 12:02 PM

I was interested to see you have a reflex water gauge in your S4 (your S4 I have never seen before so thanks for that). I am amazed more people don't! 

I ain't getting in the cab of one of these things without a reflex water gauge. As Sir Robert Mark might have said, "I believe it is a major contribution to road safety".

 

The reason many people don't have a reflex glass is that if you replace the glass tube with a reflex one you end up with a very short sight glass which isn't very helpful. Because we made these boilers ourselves we took the opportunity to stretch the top and bottom gauge cocks as far apart as possible so we could get a nice long glass in.


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#63 OFFLINE   djoptix

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 12:34 PM

stretch the cocks as far apart as possible

 

HAHA LOLZ

 

Seriously though, this thread is full of win.


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#64 OFFLINE   mercrocker

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 12:45 PM

Wonderful thread.   And a very humbling one to a person not a million miles away from my laptop who has yet to fix a broken mass-produced piece of tinware for which parts are available in the motor factors over the road..... 

 

HMS Sultan down in Gosport run a Sentinel and its often out and about in the area - I think Squire Dawson has some first-hand knowledge of it? 

 

 

Here is a link for those who relish more waggonery - 

 

https://en-gb.facebo...f=page_internal


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#65 OFFLINE   JimH

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 01:26 PM

I'll put this here because it is hardly worth a new thread and I didn't see one on tin bashing. One of the longer term projects is a Merryweather steam fire engine which has been in the family for a fair few decades now. This is in need of, among other things, a new boiler. Oddly the one task which was putting a mental block on proceeding with the design and documentation of a new boiler was the cladding. The cladding? Surely such a trivial thing as insulation would be a doddle compared with manufacturing a new boiler.

 

Aye well this has bothered us for many years decades because the cladding is entirely brass and that age hardens and cracks. The chemicals in polishes doesn't help this process (apparently). The upshot is that after 110 years or so the cladding looked like this. Notice all of the cracks? One option was to have it heat treated and start silver soldering up the cracks. Then a more skilled basher than I could sit there with a soft faced slapper gently dressing out the ripples and dents.

 

15407053170_1bdddc5ffd_o.jpg

 

Here's a thing. When researching the availability of panel beating tools don't type "leather faced slapper" into Google and expect anything useful back. Ho hum.

 

Anyway. The problem with this job is that rather simple looking radius at the top. You need to lose metal to fold it in which is tricky. An option is to spin it. This was no good because it was too deep for all of the spinners we spoke to. We could have made it in two sections with a band round the middle but that is hardly pretty. Hell, they managed in 100 years ago so we can't let it beat us. Again, maybe a better basher could have sat down with hammer and dolly and just keep dressing it down until they got there. I suspect this is the approach taken originally. The offending curve and the offensive cracks.

 

15593500022_b0e8d96bc0_o.jpg

 

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So where to begin? First buy a big sheet of brass, roll it into a cylinder and silver solder the butt joint. So far so easy. Then, taking the largest sledgehammer to crack a nut you acquire some slabs of polypropylene from a plate heat exchanger and bolt them into a large plastic block. Then you put it in your big lathe and turn the curve on it. This was done by calculation. Yes kids, maths in action!

 

This is the plastic guide mounted on a big piece of pipe the right distance from the ground.

 

15593499772_fd2c9b550b_o.jpg

 

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Then all you need to do is anneal the brass, slipin onto your guide and off you go with your hammers. The results speak for themselves.

 

45375206982_a3a642f574_o.jpg

 

Shite. This sorry mess is what we keep hidden behind a bench after it was cut off. Luckily we made the cylinder much longer than it needed to be. We reckoned we had another four attempts before another sheet of brass was needed. After some thought and discussion we came up with the idea of crimping the top of the cylinder to make a nice even start to the curve. So taking a body jack we made a funny looking press to form ridges. After that the cylinder looked a lot like we were going to be investigated by the CIA and MI6 for building a nasty weapon.

 

15568974106_92a61cb821_o.jpg

 

A shell casing from a super gun?

 

14971915904_693a420be5_o.jpg

 

So, with the crinkles to help guide us when we are hitting it maybe this attempt will be more successful. So you break out the body hammers and start hitting hard (but controlled). Things are looking hopeful...

 

 

15593499302_cb255dbbed_o.jpg

 

The massive problem with brass is that it work hardens. Steel or aluminium you can just keep hitting and biffing and bashing until it is where you need it to be. Brass on the other hand does not like being moved and you need to anneal it regularly. In a patch you would get half a dozen hammer blows before it went hard. What this meant was that you got a hammer blows once aroud the circumference before you had to lift it off with the floor crane, turn off the workshop lights and heat it to a dull red with the gas/air torch (oxy-propane is a bit too hot). Then you waited for it to cool to slip it back onto the guide. This is a painfully long process but s  l  o  w  l  y you start to make progress.

 

15593499252_b471f9dfc3_o.jpg

 

Keep going...

 

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Starting to look hopeful...You can see the bit that keeps getting heated.

 

15407052160_a2d4ee97d0_o.jpg

 

And eventually, after a couple of scares, you get there. It's got a curve and you feel pretty bloody pleased with yourself I can tell you. The black line marks the overlap of the chimney.

 

15453532629_5478ab981f_o.jpg

 

We are only part way there because what you have is a pretty bashed bit of brass. So you go to the cupboard and get the stack of tinsmith's wooden hammers that you bought a few years ago with this job in mind and start to work out how to use them to dress out all of the dents. So you biff and bash and rub chalk on it to see where you need to hit and in the end it looks like this. Ignore the crinkly section - that bit gets cut out to take the exhaust pipes from the engine so we didn't finish that. 

 

15454036318_6a04e2bcce_o.jpg

 

Now it is time for more filing and using miles of abrasive tape until it looks like this...

 

15454605970_e18aaf1aec_o.jpg

 

And then it is buffing wheels and soap time and after only a few hours one small patch looks like this

 

15453532459_010bdb5f7d_o.jpg

 

By now you feel like you can do anything so it's time for a brew. And then, as if by magic after only a couple of weekends' more polishing you end up with this.

 

16017959807_1435c3c480_o.jpg

 

The grubby bit at the bottom is the excess we had to play with. It will be cut off. All the holes in it will have to wait until the shell is made because the cladding has to fit very tightly to the shell couplings and we only have one go at it. Wreck it now and there's trouble.

 

So there you go. How to make a new boiler cladding for a 1908 Merryweather Gem in ony thirty years or so. Sadly about this point it was decided to build another waggon so this just sits in the workshop for another day.


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#66 OFFLINE   mercrocker

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 01:55 PM

You know, one of the best things about involvement in a project like this is the knowledge that, years after we have all kicked the bucket, something gets left behind that bears our handiwork for future generations.   Like I said - a very humbling thread!


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1963 Morry Thou

1955 Cowley

1987 VW T25 Holdsworth

1990 190E

197? Portafold Caravan 

2000 Fiesta Zetec Ghia

 






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