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2006 Golf 2.0TFSi GTi - Bargain Basement 197k miles TFSI Club Member


SiC

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I need to drive it more to get a better feeling for power delivery. Definitely not a lot under 2k. 3k the party is definitely started and is pulling well. But that 2k to 3k range I need to get a better feeling for lag. At the moment I've been booting it to check that it boosts okay with no weird noises. 

It's also quite easy to go too fast, especially if you keep in a high gear for economy. Even light press on the accelerator pedal builds up speed. So 40mph in 5th, a light press and you look down a few seconds later to see it's doing 50mph. 

At the moment, my old 1.8t seemed a more progressive power delivery. Even though (from memory) the 2.0t has a flatter torque curve. But that doesn't take into account boost lag. 

Is the S3 a K04? I know the internals of the engine is different and tougher but couldn't remember if the turbo is different. 

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Getting a lot of smoke out the front of the car. I thought it was when I washed the engine bay down from spilling coolant however I've done a few miles since then and it should be dry. Also coolant tank appears empty. I'll double check in a bit as the tank is a pretty murky and can't see through it. If it is, hopefully it's just it burping (I did top it up after the work and giving it a run though). Possibly the radiator could be leaking too given the smoke/vapour out the front.

If it is empty, I'm not sure why the coolant sensor didn't trigger on the dash. Unless someone has coded that sensor out. The tank sensors are prone to failing. My TT did it - scrape the metal probe on the sensor to fix. So possibly coded out because of that. Given the reason it went to Co-part, so I can't imagine it was coded out because of a leak. 

Offside rear brake is squeaking when the car is hot. So possibly sticky caliper/sliders? Noticed that side is not red and different from others. Hopefully needs to be just cleaned up and lubricated. 

Old car troubles. *sigh*

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8 hours ago, SiC said:

I need to drive it more to get a better feeling for power delivery. Definitely not a lot under 2k. 3k the party is definitely started and is pulling well. But that 2k to 3k range I need to get a better feeling for lag. At the moment I've been booting it to check that it boosts okay with no weird noises. 

It's also quite easy to go too fast, especially if you keep in a high gear for economy. Even light press on the accelerator pedal builds up speed. So 40mph in 5th, a light press and you look down a few seconds later to see it's doing 50mph. 

At the moment, my old 1.8t seemed a more progressive power delivery. Even though (from memory) the 2.0t has a flatter torque curve. But that doesn't take into account boost lag. 

Is the S3 a K04? I know the internals of the engine is different and tougher but couldn't remember if the turbo is different. 

I think this era of VAG had a very aggressive throttle map, such that 30% of pedal press = 80% of actual throttle open. It was a trick to make the test drive experience more likely to result in a $ale. 

FWIW I've driven @Cluffy's GTI (DSG) a few times and it does seem pretty linear all across the rev range. 

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9 hours ago, SiC said:

I need to drive it more to get a better feeling for power delivery. Definitely not a lot under 2k. 3k the party is definitely started and is pulling well. But that 2k to 3k range I need to get a better feeling for lag. At the moment I've been booting it to check that it boosts okay with no weird noises. 

It's also quite easy to go too fast, especially if you keep in a high gear for economy. Even light press on the accelerator pedal builds up speed. So 40mph in 5th, a light press and you look down a few seconds later to see it's doing 50mph. 

At the moment, my old 1.8t seemed a more progressive power delivery. Even though (from memory) the 2.0t has a flatter torque curve. But that doesn't take into account boost lag. 

Is the S3 a K04? I know the internals of the engine is different and tougher but couldn't remember if the turbo is different. 

Yes the S3 is a K04, hence the question, I've not driven a K03 car but I guessed the smaller turbo might boost a bit better lower down.

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Sorted the brakes. Basically stripped the rear offside, cleaned up, regreased and reassembled. I think the noise was a combination of the backplate catching and the retaining clips scraping against the disc. The discs definitely has a warp in it and it has a slight score where the pad retaining clip caught it. I've moved that over a bit and dabbed a tiny bit of grease on the moving bits. Apart from the sliders (which grease was a bit manky), there was no lube on any of the contact points.

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When doing this, I left the side lights on and forgot about it. In the space of half hour I'd completely flattened the battery. Tbh it was barely starting the car at times and I didn't have much confidence in it. I slapped the original battery that was in the Spitfire (that now has a correct one) which is smaller but far more healthy.

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There definitely is a coolant leak. I topped up the coolant to the maximum marker - took a fair bit as the tank was completely empty. After a 4.5 mile drive, which was sufficient for it to get fully to temperature, the level has dropped to nearly the bottom again. Given I drove the car back without any drop (at least noticeable), it's definitely happened since I touched it.

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Problem is that I can't find it. I'm almost certain it's coming from the left side of the engine bay as that's where the smoke is coming out. With the bonnet shut, it's coming out around the light area. The smoke has that distinct coolant smell. 

I don't think it's the radiator. I can't see any noticeable leaks out of it and from what I can see it's in good condition. Possibly even not very old.

There are two suspicions. First is the coolant tank itself. Whether the cap isn't holding pressure or there is a split. I'm not 100% convinced of this though as I thought I'd see more smoke around that area. 

Other is the coolant pipe that I disconnected which goes in front of the cambelt cover. I disconnected one side so I could get that cover off. But again I can't see any leaks and only suspecting as I disturbed it. 

Any suggestions on ways I can find it are welcome. 

I've topped it back up to a plastic section inside the tank and I'll see in the morning if it drops. I.e. does it only drop when the system is under pressure? If so, I reckon more likely the tank or cap. 

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I’ve put some uv die in the coolant before and used the special torch that can come with it.

Very helpful when tracking down a weeping hose in the MINI

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I’ve put some uv die in the coolant before and used the special torch that can come with it.
Very helpful when tracking down a weeping hose in the MINI
I was trying to find a kit like that on Amazon but was struggling to see anything suitable
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I’ve found one on the Amazon app. A small bottle of dye and torch in the Ring Automotive shop but I’m a bit of a Luddite and don’t know how to post a link.

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Have you got one of them vacuum coolant filler/bleeder things? I must admit I was sceptical at first, but it really is money well spent. Particularly because you can pressure test the system really easily after filling it, without having to get it hot and take it on the road. Just pump it to 15PSI and any leaks will show up on the comfort of your driveway

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16 minutes ago, cobblers said:

Have you got one of them vacuum coolant filler/bleeder things? I must admit I was sceptical at first, but it really is money well spent. Particularly because you can pressure test the system really easily after filling it, without having to get it hot and take it on the road. Just pump it to 15PSI and any leaks will show up on the comfort of your driveway

or make your own with a spare radiator cap, a Schrader valve, a tyre inflator from a compressor and a bicycle pump

I used such a contraption to find a pesky leak on my old Bini Cooper

 

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Coolant level hasn't dropped since last night. It was just below the plastic pin sticking down. If anything, I think it's risen a tad as it's cooled off. So almost certainly leaking when under pressure.

I'm also pleased it's not leaking when sat as it means I don't have to rush to fix. Last thing I want is this car to poison either my or any other cats/animals that live around here. 

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The tank is pretty skanky and dirty. 

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Cap looks absolutely fine though. When I removed it last night, it let out pressure. So definitely is sealing to some degree. But it's hard to judge the caps holding full pressure just from looking at it.  

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If the cap is letting coolant escape then it goes down the side of the tank and I believe ends up running into this chassis leg section. It's almost dry now so it'll be interesting to see if it gets wet after a run. Now it will get wet to a certain degree as the level is now over maximum and I fully expect the tank to find it's own level even if in working order.

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It could also be that the tank has a split in it. Not unlikely but I'd be surprised if it's suddenly happened when I've touched other parts of the cooling system and only the lid of this tank. 

If it's not the tank then it's going to be a pain in the arse to find this leak. Given the vapour is coming from this side of the engine bay, I can only imagine it's either the pipe(s) I've disturbed or this tank. Could be the water pump suddenly failing but I think that's unlikely given the above. At least I hope it is otherwise I'll be doing a cambelt job sooner 😬

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1 hour ago, Jenson Velcro said:

I’ve found one on the Amazon app. A small bottle of dye and torch in the Ring Automotive shop but I’m a bit of a Luddite and don’t know how to post a link.

I did see that but it's not on prime. So will take a few days or even next week to arrive. Ideally I want it sooner as I could do with a working car! There was another kit on Amazon Prime but the reviews were poor. 

49 minutes ago, cobblers said:

Have you got one of them vacuum coolant filler/bleeder things? I must admit I was sceptical at first, but it really is money well spent. Particularly because you can pressure test the system really easily after filling it, without having to get it hot and take it on the road. Just pump it to 15PSI and any leaks will show up on the comfort of your driveway

No I don't. They're quite expensive even the cheap sets. If I bought this when I was looking at it this morning, it'd have arrived by this evening. I've just ordered it now though so it should be delivered by the time I get a chance to work on it tomorrow. I guess it's a useful tool that I'll use a bit in the future for both pressure testing and filling cooling systems that are being awkward. 

https://amzn.eu/d/4ddbstK

I've also ordered a new Febi tank and cap. Just under £20 on Amazon to arrive tomorrow too. At this rate the whole car will be basically made by Febi 😅

If it's not the tank or cap then at least Amazon should be easy enough to return it. 

32 minutes ago, wesacosa said:

or make your own with a spare radiator cap, a Schrader valve, a tyre inflator from a compressor and a bicycle pump

I used such a contraption to find a pesky leak on my old Bini Cooper

I did contemplate doing this but I don't have an old VAG cap or anything that would fit as an alternative. 

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12 minutes ago, SiC said:

I did see that but it's not on prime. So will take a few days or even next week to arrive. Ideally I want it sooner as I could do with a working car! There was another kit on Amazon Prime but the reviews were poor. 

No I don't. They're quite expensive even the cheap sets. If I bought this when I was looking at it this morning, it'd have arrived by this evening. I've just ordered it now though so it should be delivered by the time I get a chance to work on it tomorrow. I guess it's a useful tool that I'll use a bit in the future for both pressure testing and filling cooling systems that are being awkward. 

https://amzn.eu/d/4ddbstK

I've also ordered a new Febi tank and cap. Just under £20 on Amazon to arrive tomorrow too. At this rate the whole car will be basically made by Febi 😅

If it's not the tank or cap then at least Amazon should be easy enough to return it. 

I did contemplate doing this but I don't have an old VAG cap or anything that would fit as an alternative. 

yeah that was the big issue on mine until I found that the cap off an eazibleed fits the Bini header tank perfectly, or a second hand cap off eBay/scrapper?

That said I am thinking of buying one of those Amazon kits as I have my Westfield and Estelle coolant fills to come and both are awkward 

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15 hours ago, grogee said:

I think this era of VAG had a very aggressive throttle map, such that 30% of pedal press = 80% of actual throttle open. It was a trick to make the test drive experience more likely to result in a $ale. 

FWIW I've driven @Cluffy's GTI (DSG) a few times and it does seem pretty linear all across the rev range. 

I was thinking that perhaps this might be the case. Same with the massively over assisted brakes too. A light push sends you through the windscreen. I was playing with them last night on a test drive and the difference between a normal stop and a full guns blazing locking wheels up with ABS kicking in, is only a slightly harder press. 

Like you said, it gives the allusion of it being a fast car with good brakes as on a test drive someone is more likely to be light footed to begin with.

A quick Google on Dyno graphs brings this up:

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Torque definitely picks up at 2k with full torque at 3k. Funnily enough I was going to say that around 2250rpm it starts building up power. That's when the boost must start kicking in and giving power. My TT 180 with it's K03 was at 2k with the 225 K04 started at around 2250rpm. The slightly higher point having boost kick in is not a bad thing for fuel economy. It means that if I keep under 2250rpm on a boring short commute, I should get better mpg.

 

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26 minutes ago, wesacosa said:

yeah that was the big issue on mine until I found that the cap off an eazibleed fits the Bini header tank perfectly, or a second hand cap off eBay/scrapper?

That said I am thinking of buying one of those Amazon kits as I have my Westfield and Estelle coolant fills to come and both are awkward 

The VAG cap screws inside the tank neck rather than others over the outside. I don't think I could raid anything to make it fit unfortunately. Only other way would be a rubber bung that wedges in there - like the filling/pressure kits do. But I don't have one of them either. 

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I've often got away with not needing a vacuum bleeding kit (my Boxster should have needed it) by jacking up the end that has the tank to make it the highest point. But should be a useful tool to have in the inventory. 

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24 minutes ago, SiC said:

I was thinking that perhaps this might be the case. Same with the massively over assisted brakes too. A light push sends you through the windscreen. I was playing with them last night on a test drive and the difference between a normal stop and a full guns blazing locking wheels up with ABS kicking in, is only a slightly harder press. 

Like you said, it gives the allusion of it being a fast car with good brakes as on a test drive someone is more likely to be light footed to begin with.

A quick Google on Dyno graphs brings this up:

2007_Golf_GTI_stock-150k-99ronCC1__08177.thumb.jpg.f7995331002e2c7c1326866f3339b481.jpg

Torque definitely picks up at 2k with full torque at 3k. Funnily enough I was going to say that around 2250rpm it starts building up power. That's when the boost must start kicking in and giving power. My TT 180 with it's K03 was at 2k with the 225 K04 started at around 2250rpm. The slightly higher point having boost kick in is not a bad thing for fuel economy. It means that if I keep under 2250rpm on a boring short commute, I should get better mpg.

 

If you follow R-Tech on FB they are regularly mentioning trying to map things with a linear throttle, which does suggest they aren't very linear to begin with.

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5 minutes ago, Dave_Q said:

If you follow R-Tech on FB they are regularly mentioning trying to map things with a linear throttle, which does suggest they aren't very linear to begin with.

I'm almost tempted to take it to them and have it mapped with a stock map but with a linear throttle response. You're far more knowledgeable than me on this but I imagine flattening off a throttle map curve and leaving the fuel tables alone would be a straightforward thing to do at home? 

I don't fancy putting an extra +30bhp to +50bhp through this aged car without a large concern that it'll risk finishing off and blowing the turbo up. 

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5 minutes ago, SiC said:

I'm almost tempted to take it to them and have it mapped with a stock map but with a linear throttle response. You're far more knowledgeable than me on this but I imagine flattening off a throttle map curve and leaving the fuel tables alone would be a straightforward thing to do at home? 

I don't fancy putting an extra +30bhp to +50bhp through this aged car without a large concern that it'll risk finishing off and blowing the turbo up. 

If you can pull your ECU hardware/software numbers I can see what I can find. 

In general by this age the throttle map was (rpm x throttle %) and the output is torque demand so shouldn't be any bother to smooth it out, and if you left the full throttle area and the injector/timing/boost maps all the same you wouldn't make more power.

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1 hour ago, Dave_Q said:

If you can pull your ECU hardware/software numbers I can see what I can find. 

In general by this age the throttle map was (rpm x throttle %) and the output is torque demand so shouldn't be any bother to smooth it out, and if you left the full throttle area and the injector/timing/boost maps all the same you wouldn't make more power.

I wasn't sure if a completely linear throttle response would be nice to drive. Even something completely mechanical like a carb engine isn't a direct linear response to throttle position. I imagine possibly a linear response low down and then near exponential further up. 

Tbh the easiest way is probably to copy a throttle map from something older that kept it simple and aimed for drivability, or a lot newer where they've refined the response a lot more. Newer presumably have two maps for sports mode and normal. Sports aggressive and normal more usable. 

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On 12/02/2024 at 23:34, SiC said:

This is good as the thermostat is a nightmare on these to change. Also a good indication again that someone has spent money on this car as ime thermostats most people don't realise or notice need doing.

Faaaaaark!

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Thermostat housing looks to have a crack in it. My new toy found it within seconds once I built up a few psi of pressure.

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Apparently a common issue especially with aftermarket units. I might go to a dealer and try getting a genuine. 

 @Dave_Q I know you've done a thermostat recently. Any tips and stuff I should order in addition when I'm in there? 

I want to avoid removing the intake manifold as I don't want to break more stuff!

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I have only bad news I'm afraid.

I did do mine, and not wanting to take the inlet manifold off I went in from underneath. If you take off the alternator (which is easy) and the main boost pipe from the TB, then you can in theory get it out that way.

However, it's still a pain. You can't see what you are doing, it's not just the actual thermostat bolts there are also a couple of solid coolant lines you have to unbolt which are tiny triple square bolts you can only feel. I rounded one of these off and had to powerfile the head off.

I was somewhat nervous that it hadn't gone together right simply as you couldn't see but it was OK thankfully.

When I later took the inlet off and saw how much access it gives you to the stat, I kinda wished I had done it that way anyway as I don't think I actually saved much time going from underneath.

I broke 3 things taking the inlet off, one was a breather hose which isn't currently fitted to yours, one was the coolant fitting you've replaced, the other was the coolant fitting on the end of the head which the brake booster line goes through, so be careful with that if you go that way.

Whichever method you go for, chuck a load of lube on the main boost pipe to get it back on the throttle body as it's a war, nearly impossible without.

If you are taking the inlet off, I used these impact driver bits/extensions as you definitely can't get 3/8 stuff through the gaps, if you have a good 1/4 selection you might be OK. The manifold bolts are T30.

Good luck!

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Ordered a Mahle/Behr. Mostly because I can get it by the weekend, Mahle/Behr should be decent and MY GOD HOW MUCH IS MY CREDIT CARD BILL THIS MONTH. I'll probably send the coolant tank and cap back.  Was considering keeping it on the shelf but I think they don't fail very often and having the £20 would be useful.

6 minutes ago, Dave_Q said:

If you are taking the inlet off

I am tempted. I remember doing the TT 1.8t thermostat and started by not removing the alternator. I dropped a bit and ended up needing to. However with it off, access was a million times better and tbh I think it's quicker to. 

Question is, if I remove the manifold, what else do I need to replace? E.g. any o-rings on the injectors or gaskets you reckon a nearly 200k TFSi that could have never had it's intake off may need. Or even that you had to replace. 

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I missed posting the link to the extension.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/erbauer-1-4-hex-magnetic-bit-extension-150mm/85559?ref=SFAppShare

On the injectors there are teflon seal rings where they go into the head and O rings where they go into the rail. I replaced all mine both ends as I sent my injectors off for cleaning and testing. 

There is also a 2 part clamp that holds them into the head, one bit is plastic and almost guaranteed to break. I bought one of these kits for the clamps (as VAG don't sell them separately, only with a similar kit) but I got my O rings and teflon seals from the injector place.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/186217236108?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=EgGS6wAyTp-&sssrc=4429486&ssuid=Aea-iJSdRUi&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

If you're trying to keep it cheap I'd buy one of those kits and use as little of it as possible. I think 3 of my injectors stayed in the head anyway so the teflon seal wasn't disturbed, and TBH all the seals both ends looked fine to re-use.

None of my seals looked especially bad, so it's a toss up whether random Chinese parts are worse than the 200k mile originals. I think the VAG equivalent to that clamp&seal kits runs to about £20-30 per injector.

If you are taking it off you probably won't be able to resist cleaning some of the carbon out of the inlet ports, I got a walnut blaster but TBH you would achieve almost the same results with a small wire brush on a drill and some brake cleaner.

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The "While you're in there" problem. 

Oh man. 

I was hoping to go for at least a month of use (like 300 to 500 miles - basically a tank of petrol) before needing to give it major mechanical repair.

🤣😫🤦‍♂️😭

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On 09/02/2024 at 17:41, SiC said:

A 4 minute walk around video. Sorry I struggled on this one and probably not my best video. Hard to make a video about a Golf particularly thrilling.

 

sounds alright for a diesel!

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1 minute ago, Noel Tidybeard said:

sounds alright for a diesel!

Go wash your mouth out!

You should listen to what VAG class as a diesel with that age PD. This is a refined purring sewing machine in comparison!

I'd go take a video of my wife's Civic 1.8 as a comparison. However she's using it as it hasn't and never* has broken. 

 

 

* Apart from that one time last year where a coil pack went bad. 

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