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Stodge


vulgalour

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All this discussion about UK cars vs European ones very much misses the point that the Japanese were the superior suppliers of stodge.

I say were, as the Koreans seem to have overtaken them.

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Stodge in this thread specifically refers to vehicles from the Olden Dayes and while some Japanese offerings will no doubt qualify, I don't think Korea was doing that much in an automotive sense in the Golden Stodge Era.  Happy to be proven wrong though, and would love to see some lumbering fifties luxury* contraption from Korea (North or South) if there is one.

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32 minutes ago, 320touring said:

Having been on a Narrowboat recently, I am half tempted to put a b- series diesel In the Oxford..

Make sure it’s a road version, the cranks are different in anything designed to run on a boat, they’re designed to run at a constant steady low speed apparently. 

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2 hours ago, artdjones said:

This is my idea of stodge Singer_SM1500_(5955183789).thumb.jpg.43bedaec70c00de058f6a3c65d735d09.jpg

Ultimate 1950s An Car. I'm not convinced they even really exist. Absolutely would, 100% (I've tried a couple of times, actually, and I've got first refusal on one in hand)

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12 minutes ago, barrett said:

Ultimate 1950s An Car. I'm not convinced they even really exist. Absolutely would, 100% (I've tried a couple of times, actually, and I've got first refusal on one in hand)

Strangely, it isn't that boring technically, with an overhead camshaft when that was very rare, and plastic bonnet and boot on the later versions.  Apparently heavy and awkward to drive. But the non styling is wonderfully stodgy.

Even more awkward styling was exhibited by another stodge landmark, the Vauxhall Wyvern.Vauxhall_Wyvern_ca_1949_at_Weston_Park.thumb.jpeg.c8256635b3ba32a28b67257b636cf77b.jpeg

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24 minutes ago, artdjones said:

Even more awkward styling was exhibited by another stodge landmark, the Vauxhall Wyvern

The Wyvern was also technically interesting.   Monocoque construction, so fairly lightweight, an unusual torsion bar independent front suspension, and an over-square engine, so it was quite advanced for its time, although hampered by a 3 speed gearbox.   And rust problems.   Also available in 6 cylinder Velox flavour.  I'd be interested to drive one as quite a lot of thought must have gone into the design.  Maybe not as stogy as it looks.

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27 minutes ago, Mr Pastry said:

The Wyvern was also technically interesting.   Monocoque construction, so fairly lightweight, an unusual torsion bar independent front suspension, and an over-square engine, so it was quite advanced for its time, although hampered by a 3 speed gearbox.   And rust problems.   Also available in 6 cylinder Velox flavour.  I'd be interested to drive one as quite a lot of thought must have gone into the design.  Maybe not as stogy as it looks.

It probably looked so strange because it was basically a 1940 model with a new nose and tail. Not Vauxhall styling's finest hour. The E Series replacement was a big leap forward. 

Vauxhall offered a three speed up to the time of the FD Victor, 20 years later.

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57 minutes ago, Mr Pastry said:

The Wyvern was also technically interesting.   Monocoque construction, so fairly lightweight, an unusual torsion bar independent front suspension, and an over-square engine, so it was quite advanced for its time, although hampered by a 3 speed gearbox.   And rust problems.   Also available in 6 cylinder Velox flavour.  I'd be interested to drive one as quite a lot of thought must have gone into the design.  Maybe not as stogy as it looks.

We just featured a better-than-new example of the Wyvern in the magazine. Sent our porridge correspondent to try it, and even he (who drives a Hillman Super Minx) thought it was pretty horrible to drive and had very few redeeming features. General consensus seems to be the prewar 10/4 (which features much of the same tech) is a better car overall, but still pretty unloved

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3 hours ago, Sunny Jim said:

@vulgalourmay I present the Sibal from 1955. Based on the underpinnings of a Willys Jeep the bodies were constructed from old oil drums.

sibal.webp.15fa642952952a5f1efb0e2d9985e4d9.webp

A bit more info here

Well that's just glorious, thanks for making me aware of it!

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I can almost turn (heave) my P4 wheel one lock when stationary and letting go springs it back to the exact same position it was before. Hopefully my 2022 tyres will improve this somewhat over the 1993 date coded tyres currently on it. 

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Stodge also provides another use, in that the cars are generally affordable for the working man/woman. Lots of classic cars cost £20k upwards and the Stodge means the classic car hobby isn’t exclusive to wealthy retired gentry types with handlebars and tweed. A little Austin, Morris, Hillman or Standard means someone who isn’t ridiculously well off can own and enjoy a nice old classic car of their own.

For those who are interested, my A70 Hampshire is almost ready to hit the road again. I’ve been working flat out on it for months and it’s really turned a corner now. It still looks a total shed but is borderline legal!
I don’t know whether to update the thread though. The impression I got (get?) is that there is very little interest in British porridge like this on here, despite its extreme rarity.
 

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Prices of 50’s cars seems to be dropping a bit, I don’t know if it’s because many of the owners are dying out but I suppose it’s good news for anyone looking for one. Ultimate stodgy Standard Vanguard must be the diesel, do any still survive? 

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10 minutes ago, Angrydicky said:


Stodge also provides another use, in that the cars are generally affordable for the working man/woman. Lots of classic cars cost £20k upwards and the Stodge means the classic car hobby isn’t exclusive to wealthy retired gentry types with handlebars and tweed. A little Austin, Morris, Hillman or Standard means someone who isn’t ridiculously well off can own and enjoy a nice old classic car of their own.

For those who are interested, my A70 Hampshire is almost ready to hit the road again. I’ve been working flat out on it for months and it’s really turned a corner now. It still looks a total shed but is borderline legal!
I don’t know whether to update the thread though. The impression I got (get?) is that there is very little interest in British porridge like this on here, despite its extreme rarity.
 

Go on, go on. Update it!

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8 minutes ago, Angrydicky said:

For those who are interested, my A70 Hampshire is almost ready to hit the road again. I’ve been working flat out on it for months and it’s really turned a corner now. It still looks a total shed but is borderline legal!
I don’t know whether to update the thread though. The impression I got (get?) is that there is very little interest in British porridge like this on here, despite its extreme rarity.

I absolutely love what you’ve been doing with the Hampshire and can’t wait to see it being driven around again. I think a lot of us feel the same way; don’t assume there needs to be loads of likes and comments on the thread for your hard work to be appreciated by many. 
 

I would certainly like to see an update with what you’ve been doing lately. Does it have to get an MOT before seeing use again? 

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40 minutes ago, Angrydicky said:


Stodge also provides another use, in that the cars are generally affordable for the working man/woman. Lots of classic cars cost £20k upwards and the Stodge means the classic car hobby isn’t exclusive to wealthy retired gentry types with handlebars and tweed. A little Austin, Morris, Hillman or Standard means someone who isn’t ridiculously well off can own and enjoy a nice old classic car of their own.

For those who are interested, my A70 Hampshire is almost ready to hit the road again. I’ve been working flat out on it for months and it’s really turned a corner now. It still looks a total shed but is borderline legal!
I don’t know whether to update the thread though. The impression I got (get?) is that there is very little interest in British porridge like this on here, despite its extreme rarity.
 

No interest? Nah! I joined TDW just to catch up 👌

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44 minutes ago, Angrydicky said:

I don’t know whether to update the thread though. The impression I got (get?) is that there is very little interest in British porridge like this on here, despite its extreme rarity.

enjoying the instagram updates on it.

Me being me, and not wishing to turn this thread into an utter bunfight, I'm Mr fence splinters here, always have been, but I'd like a jolly 'list of stodge' here so the next time I've got £5k sitting around and am in good health (maybe in the next world?), I'll know what to buy. 

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33 minutes ago, Matty said:

Actually @vulgalour as creator and curator what are the guidelines? Can we put a bracket of years on it or are we classing 1800s maxis and the like?

Maxis and 1800s are just regular Shite innit. I think this 'stodge' handle has been given to pre- and immediately postwar cars which look noticeably out-of-step with 'modern' car design - ie, the 404 above does not qualify because it's basically just a modern car (also, again, one of the best cars ever built and probably the best real world daily driver cla**ic out there. Lovely things). I don't think OP meant 'stodge' to = 'boring' necessarily. Or he better fucking not have, including my Palladium in the list! I dare anyone to drive an open 1923 car on beaded-edge tyres at 55mph and tell me it's a boring experience... Anyway, that's my interpretation - things that are obviously 'older' than what msot people consider to be sensible means of transportation, so probably has to be pre-1960 at least to qualify. Might just be putting words in @vulgalour's mouth but that's what I thought he meant.


I think as a general rule 1959 was a turning point in 'modern' car design with the Mini, Anglia and Herald, with most things that came after that essentially being indistinguishable from one another (with a few exceptions) and therefore equal parts less interesting and easier to live with.

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