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Peter C

2007 Volvo V70 D5 2.4 automatic - SOLD - New Owner Updates

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The folks at WBAC simply go on appearance.

Which, as they are owned by British Car Auctions, all they need to care about. If it looks decent and drives around under its own steam at a bit faster than running speed, it's all good to them. They then punt it on into the auction and leave it for the next buyer who's won a "bargain" to sort.

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Yeah we did, which was easy enough but sadly it didn't make any difference. AA guy checked a few things but didn't find anything conclusive. Have ordered Vida/Dice, might have a play with it tomorrow to check compression and a few other things but to be honest there's probably not much point messing around with it until I've got proper diagnostics.

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VIDA/DICE is a right PITA to install, but here are some notes from when I installed my copy that might help.  

 

Interestingly, the laptop became increasingly reluctant to boot soon after it was installed, almost as if there was something up with Windows, so I wouldn't put my house on the Ebay knockoff software not being riddled with malware.   The laptop I installed it on is pretty much scrap anyway, so it could just be down to that.

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VIDA/DICE is a right PITA to install, but here are some notes from when I installed my copy that might help.  

 

Interestingly, the laptop became increasingly reluctant to boot soon after it was installed, almost as if there was something up with Windows, so I wouldn't put my house on the Ebay knockoff software not being riddled with malware.   The laptop I installed it on is pretty much scrap anyway, so it could just be down to that.

Thanks, that's very useful - particularly the bit about getting round the 3GB RAM requirement. It looks like a a pain but I can't see it being any worse than Lexia! It'll be going on a disposable diagnostics laptop anyway but again, thanks for the heads up.

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I’ll have a large saveloy please.

Did you replace the fuel filter?

Drop in on Jezza Clarkson, he knows a lot about Mota's like.

 

Well done on diving in, much much interest to see how the punt works out.

 

This sort of challenge can be very rewarding both in knowledge gained and money saved. On the other hand, it could be a big headache, but the risk is low as you can always punt it on......here it is ladies and gentlemen, the Volvo v70 on the 57 plate, loeveley car, where do see it, put it in......start me off at fifteen now......at a five I'm bid, five I'm bid..........Chippy you say........Nats away from West Ox Mota Knockings is that.

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I would hazard a guess that this might be an Abs sensor/ring issue. The gearboxes in these have traction control. If one of the abs sensors is throwing out a wrong signal it will cut power to the engine thinking its hunting for grip. Out of interest try manually deactivating the traction control to see if there's any difference.

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I recall that the Volvo had a broken ABS sensor replaced not that long ago, however the dash lit up like a Christmas tree and the ECU stored a fault code. Will’s friend plugged in an OBD reader yesterday and came up with no faults found.

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I've just remembered another possible cause - if it has them, the vacuum operated engine mounts might be leaking.   I'm not sure whether the 185bhp engine has vacuum mounts as they might have ditched them when they went over to the electrically operated turbo vanes, but the 163bhp engine does and they cause these kinds of symptoms when they go.  (Vacuum mounts might sound like a left handed screwdriver type thing, but the idea is they're compliant at idle and firmer at high revs).  I never had any bother with them on my engine, which might mean they weren't there.

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I've just remembered another possible cause - if it has them, the vacuum operated engine mounts might be leaking.   I'm not sure whether the 185bhp engine has vacuum mounts as they might have ditched them when they went over to the electrically operated turbo vanes, but the 163bhp engine does and they cause these kinds of symptoms when they go.  (Vacuum mounts might sound like a left handed screwdriver type thing, but the idea is they're compliant at idle and firmer at high revs).  I never had any bother with them on my engine, which might mean they weren't there.

Sounds like a classic example of over complicating something for very little gain.

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There’s little on these that will cause your symptoms without flagging up an error message on the dashboard.

Two that will are a blocked fuel filter and a dodgy MAF.

As you’ve changed the filter, try unplugging the MAF and driving it...it should default to a safe set of parameters that will run at around 85% performance.

 

Incidentally these require a low ash content oil and a decent run at least every week or two...lack of either will result in a clogged DPF but that should bring up an emissions or ash related message on start up.

 

I had one from new back in 2006 that I put 300k miles on by 2010...by and large it was pretty reliable but I’ve seen quite a few that have destroyed the rockers and follower castings in the head due to a lack of oil changes. Probably not the case with this one though as they get as rattly as hell from the top end before finally giving up.

 

One other common issue on these...in the air intake between the intercooler and the inlet manifold, there’s an electronic valve...it looks like a throttle body but it’s sole purpose is to close the air inlet off when you turn off the engine and shut it down a bit more gently. These have plastic gears that strip as the valve starts to get clogged up with carbon but usually fail in the wide open position. In theory, if it failed partially closed, it could bring on severely restricted performance without necessarily flagging a fault code.

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My 185bhp V70 had a problem with oil consumption, which I think was due to it constantly trying to regenerate a DPF that should have been changed earlier. 

 

This progressed into frequent 'soot filter full' messages combined with going into limp mode, so I replaced the valve stem oil seals in an attempt to resolve it, a time consuming job that involved a lot of dismantling.  It did improve the situation but didn't solve it, and I eventually decided that it was most likely to do with the oil control rings and at this point I decided CU L8R Volvo and bought a Mondeo.

 

Whilst the injectors were out, I inspected the pistons with a borescope.  Interestingly, the tops of them appeared to have been melted and there was no sign of the recess that is supposed to be cast into them.  Didn't fancy that much.

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Thanks for the suggestions all. To save me quoting all of them, here are my thoughts on some of them:

 

ABS fault: engine won't rev when stationary and no ABS lights on the dash, brakes seem to function as normal.

 

Vacuum engine mounts: this engine has them, I tried blocking off the pipe to the front mount but it didn't seem to make a difference. The turbo on these later Euro 4 engines isn't vacuum controlled, I'm not sure if anything else is.

 

Fuel filter: changed, old one didn't look too bad and changing it didn't make any difference

 

MAF: unplugged briefly, didn't make any difference when revving the engine with the car stationary.

 

Rockers/followers: possible, but the car has a fully stamped service book and appears to have been well looked after. Engine sounds healthy but I haven't completely ruled it out. I'm reluctant to do a compression test until I've investigated a few other things in case a glow plug snaps off or something annoying like that.

 

Anti-shudder valve: I think on this engine the assembly you're referring to is also the EGR valve. The AA guy disconnected the pipe between that valve and the inlet manifold so that the engine was drawing in fresh air straight into the manifold and still wasn't running right, so I think I can eliminate EGR/ASV issues.

 

At the moment I'm leaning towards fuel supply. There's an intermittent ticking that sounds like it might be coming from one of the injectors and two of the injectors sound quite different to the others when listening to them with a stethoscope. Plan of action is to get my copy of Vida sorted out when it arrives and use that to do a kill test on the injectors as well as check live values for stuff like fuel pressure, injector trim etc. I've also got stuff on the way to assemble a fairly shite leak-off test kit. If one or more of the injectors turn out to be dodgy I've got a can of diesel purge ordered as well - may as well give that a go before I start thinking about changing injectors. Keep the suggestions coming please!

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Has someone suggested turbo vanes stuck shut yet? Oven cleaner trick?

 

Or

 

Moss build up in the gauze on the sender unit thus blocking fuel supply?

 

Or

 

Could timing be out somehow on the pump (I’m not sure without the engine sounding spot on as I’m sure it does...)

 

Or

 

Remove the boost pressure sensor and clean with cotton bud - has astra cdti’s not boosting because completely sooted up and not giving a proper reading

 

Or

 

Throttle position sensor - are plugs the correct way round? In relation to idle air valve

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Simply revving the engine whilst stationary isn’t enough to rule out a faulty MAF that’s been disconnected.

Turn the ignition off, disconnect the MAF then start the engine and give it a quick try up the street.

You won’t damage anything.

 

Also, the anti-shudder valve is nothing to do with the egr. It is made by Bosch and appears identical to an electronic throttle body...it’s located to the right hand side of the engine as you lift the bonnet and sits just below the grey engine cover towards the front corner.

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