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quicksilver

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1 hour ago, quicksilver said:

It must be local then. After all, who'd want to go very far in an 0709 Cargo?

 

I drove an 0709 from England to Portugal, then to Holland and back to Portugal. I never repeated it. It became a shed and never moved again.

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2 hours ago, quicksilver said:

The BMC looks like an FG but with a custom cab instead of the standard 'threepenny bit' design. Six-cylinder too judging by the snout.

Apparently the DVLA have it down as a cream coloured Austin, untaxed since 2014.

Looking through a few furniture van and pantechnicon images quite a few have coach-built cabs.

Here's a 6 cylinder with the normal cab which I'm not sure I've seen before.

10f11616b0888b8efa3662b841d5b249.thumb.jpg.23282694f3541211411b23f8550f4753.jpg

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17 hours ago, sierraman said:

What happens to all those old trucks you see at airports, they seem to hang on to them forever...

There are a number of factors; generally boggo stuff runs until it dies, specialised kit runs until it becomes unreliable or until (if applicable) the chassis breaks then the body is remounted. The latter is generally the case for things such as Air Start Units, Ground Power Units, Air Conditioners, that kind of thing. Self Propelled Stairs and De-icer units generally don't get rebodied.

We ran a couple of ASUs, one on a G-reg FL6 and the other on an P-reg MAN 8.163 and both bodies were on their second chassis even then.

 

Quite a lot of the stuff goes for scrap even if it's not physically worn out, largely as it's never been registered, may not comply with C&U regs and has run on cherry it's entire life. We had a US-spec Volvo FE deicer which ISTR was so afflicted.

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On 18/07/2021 at 16:33, catsinthewelder said:

Apparently the DVLA have it down as a cream coloured Austin, untaxed since 2014.

Looking through a few furniture van and pantechnicon images quite a few have coach-built cabs.

Here's a 6 cylinder with the normal cab which I'm not sure I've seen before.

10f11616b0888b8efa3662b841d5b249.thumb.jpg.23282694f3541211411b23f8550f4753.jpg

When i worked in the parts department of the local BMC agent in Canterbury these 'snout' type were known as FM models.

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This is fruit season and we get 10 or so max-size chiller artics pass most days. It's a single track road, and they are doing 15 - 20 mph up a short hill of maybe 1 in 20 which is of course no problem.

Except recently for some trucks, definitely Scanias but maybe others, which really struggle.

They sound like they are really labouring in too high a gear as the hill steepens but they don't change down.

Eventually they come to a complete halt. There is a moment or two of psst, psst, clank, clank and then off they go again, sounding happy in a much lower gear.  Reminds me of a timid driver's way of getting first before bottom gear got synchromesh.

Is this a limitation with some automated truck transmissions or is something just broken?

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2 hours ago, Asimo said:

Is this a limitation with some automated truck transmissions or is something just broken?

Bizarrely, no, this can be the autobox's programming.

I can't remember which make of truck it was, but a while ago I was told by a driver that a particular climb in Devon would frequently see lorries stalling out. They ran fairly low-powered DAFs and Scanias, which had a forced eco-map on the gearbox, which would only give manual control below a certain speed, anything beyond 25mph-ish IIRC being locked out of manual mode. So, they'd hit this hill fully loaded (albeit only 32 tons gross on them) in 10th or so, without being able to knock the box down a couple of cogs. So, the revs would drop right off, out of the torque band and lose boost, and then it'd get itself down to a speed where manual became available. Then the drivers would knock it down a coupe of cogs manually, to bring the revs up to where they should be, to climb the hill. However because they take a while to change gear, by the time it's engaged the lower gear, it's slowed down even more without getting boost up in time. Vicious cycle repeats until you hit 2nd gear, then you try going for 1st but run out of breath. And it just... stops. Handbrake on, select crawler/1st, build boost, handbrake off, then it sets off happily - just as it would have done if they could hit the hill in a low gear at 2000rpm so that it'd drop into peak torque in, maybe, 5th.

So yeah. "Economy".  Apparently screaming its head off in 1st after stalling out is more economical than working it hard on boost in 5th. And you wonder why some drivers still long for manual boxes...

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I was going to suggest the same, that it's all to do with how the gearbox is programmed. Tight-fisted operators will lock the box into 'economy' mode, which tries to hold a high gear for as long as possible and won't allow manual overrides because the ECU always knows best* how to get better* fuel consumption. Couple that with shift delays and you can easily end up running out of steam in a completely wrong gear without being able to do anything about it.

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Computer-controlled gearboxes.  Not really 'automatic' in the traditional sense.  Trouble is, the computer - unlike the driver - can't see the impending incline, and has no ability to plan ahead.  Coupled to the fact that it's programmed to always be in the highest gear possible, and takes a second or two to change down... Then the driver loses points on his or her telematics score for using >90% throttle...

Another issue that can catch a driver unawares is that the cruise control will suddenly cut off when the speed dips below a certain threshold.  If you're not ready to quickly mash the throttle pedal, you can lose what remaining momentum you have very quickly.

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