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Transfer boxes fine. Although my torqueflite gearbox died last year. The one on ebay was fitted with a range rover engine and broken gearbox.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Stonefield-p3000-breakdown-spec-lift-truck-1979/143307395239?hash=item215dc950a7:g:jjkAAOSw-X9dERqW

Is this not near you?

All you need to know about Stonefields here....

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/stonefieldtkf/discussion/all

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On 6/24/2019 at 10:17 AM, sierraman said:

So they can be chucking out all sorts of crap for an indeterminate time in Africa. What about fault finding with things like the auto gearbox, they’d be properly stuffed then I’d assume? 

Be interested to know how many actually end up in Africa. When I went to central Asia last year the overwhelming majority of trucks were ex-European, they often didn't even bother removing the original operator's decals. Mostly German companies operating in Kazakhstan it turns out. They also imported a lot of old US trucks.

On 7/3/2019 at 6:17 PM, 5speedracer said:

New Iveco S-way. Probably future truck shite.
I like it though!2ec05f082fe0263190f818d039f64c2d.jpg

Sent from my Redmi 4 using Tapatalk
 

That old Iveco Stralis cab must have been around for the best past of 30 years. So looks like the DAF XF gets the crown then of longest serving design.

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The Cf has been around just as long too.  I remember driving a 1997 85CF which had the sleeper cab without the bulge in the back of the cab so a narrow bed. Every time I get in a Cf it seems like I'm stepping back 20 odd years. The current Lf came out in 2001'ish  so had a pretty run too. They just keep lobbing a different front panel on it every so often.  I'm getting serious hankerings for getting an classic tractor unit, a Ford Transcontinental is near the top of the list.

 

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On 7/11/2019 at 4:59 PM, busmansholiday said:

As we were driving down the M1 this morning I said to Mrs BMH "grab my phone and photo that lorry".

"Lorry?, what lorry?".

"I'll tell you when, it'll be through the passenger window".

?

"Get ready"

"That lorry!".

 

She didn't do a bad job.

IMG_20190711_113425.thumb.jpg.9e4d116927322d34c36ee5e0d02e6164.jpg

Quite an impressive landmark now just north of J24

It just so happens that I was heading down the M1 yesterday morning (closer to late morning) in a 5ton brand new sprinter when I spotted that scania suspended ontop of those containers....... looks kind cool sat up there, ish. 

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9 hours ago, sutty2006 said:

It just so happens that I was heading down the M1 yesterday morning (closer to late morning) in a 5ton brand new sprinter when I spotted that scania suspended ontop of those containers....... looks kind cool sat up there, ish. 

It's been there quite a fair few months now. It's engineless, but certainly draws your attention.

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I didn't realise this technology had come in. However, although it will take some getting used to it would be brilliant not having mirrors plastered in spray in the rain and night vision would be much improved probably too. I'll miss the fact that if the mirrors clear you'll get through though! Wonder if they adjust so you can get the perfect driving position, or whether that won't be needed anymore as the mirror view will stay the same regardless of seat position. Can you still adjust the nearside mirror so you can follow the trailer in on blind sides?

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43 minutes ago, dean36014 said:

I didn't realise this technology had come in. However, although it will take some getting used to it would be brilliant not having mirrors plastered in spray in the rain and night vision would be much improved probably too. I'll miss the fact that if the mirrors clear you'll get through though! Wonder if they adjust so you can get the perfect driving position, or whether that won't be needed anymore as the mirror view will stay the same regardless of seat position. Can you still adjust the nearside mirror so you can follow the trailer in on blind sides?

The mirror cameras follow the line of the trailer when turning so you can see the rear of the trailer. It’s quite weird driving with them. The nearside mirror screen is smaller than the original mirror so takes some getting used to. 

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It has pros and cons.

As said above, if the mirrors go through so does the vehicle (bus or wagon), without that marker judging the gap is more exciting*. At least twating a low branch shouldn't result in having a view of the sky, or no mirror at all. Especially, certainly coach wise, where some of the multimirror arms cost unbelievable amounts.

I just wonder what happens when the camera decides to doo one and you're no rear vision and nowhere to tape a temporary one.

 

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16 minutes ago, busmansholiday said:

It has pros and cons.

As said above, if the mirrors go through so does the vehicle (bus or wagon), without that marker judging the gap is more exciting*. At least twating a low branch shouldn't result in having a view of the sky, or no mirror at all. Especially, certainly coach wise, where some of the multimirror arms cost unbelievable amounts.

I just wonder what happens when the camera decides to doo one and you're no rear vision and nowhere to tape a temporary one.

 

Think our breakdown lads are getting equipped with magnetic mirrors to attach to the door in cases where the camera fails. They can then be taken back to a dealer for repair. 

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Does the n/s mirror still follow the line of the trailer when doing a blind side reverse? As already said, it must be great thing in wet weather but what about when it goes wrong, which it will. A broken mirror glass is no problem for our fleet fitter but this.....

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That Dodge's cab is lush, wish modern car interiors were like that rather than the macho-handbags that they are.

As for those videoscreen "mirrors", they concern me because of the time it takes to refocus the eye from looking ahead into the distance to looking at a screen a metre or so away. This is a much slower action than just flicking a look at a mirror when no re-focussing is required. Much harder to do when eyes are tired or when eyes are older.

image.jpeg

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Guess this is the right thread for this? Lad I know at work who's into classics found this thing on eBay the other week down south near Cornwall or something. Been sat in a barn for yonks now, but it's got a lot of history.

mWWByq5.jpg

It's a 1938 Crossley, the exact model is unknown because it seems to be a weird mix between a few. Not sure if anyone here actually knows anything about these, but I did a lot of googling at the time and it seems to be a mix between a Crossley "FWD" of which production didn't start until 1940, seemingly, and the earlier Crossley Beta. It's got a big 100BHP 4 cylinder petrol (I believe 5.3L as that's what the FWD had), a 4 speed gearbox with a 2 speed transfer box (FWD meaning four wheel drive, for the record), manual locking diffs, PTO, vacuum servo hydraulic brakes etc etc. In some ways it actually seems quite sophisticated for the time, in other ways it seems extremely primitive, but overall it's a very interesting beast. 

i9a9aW3.jpg

Having been in contact with the company who's name is all over the cab (yes, they're still in business), we've learned that it was used as a balloon winch during the second world war. If I recall correctly, the company owned it twice and it was restored some time in the 50s. The rear tyres are dated 1959 and 1957, so that seems to add up.

E33yIE0.jpg

Now, after some starter motor fettling it does actually run. I haven't witnessed it running in person yet, but I've been dying to know what a 1930s 4 cylinder with a horrendous exhaust leak sounds like. It isn't perfect by any means and there's a fair bit of work to do on it before it'll drive down the road under its own power again, but mechanically it's all there and structurally it is very solid with only a couple bits of rot on the chassis. The cab is mostly wood and the chassis is covered in very thick old paint, so I'm not really surprised its lasted so long. The biggest issue, I think, is going to be finding any spare bits that it needs aswell as the fact that there is almost no documentation on the internet for these things, so we've no idea what fluids to be putting in it or anything. I have however read on a forum that the Science Museum in Manchester has a complete service manual for one of these things, so might be worth chasing that up. I'll try and get some videos of it running when I can, for anyone who might be interested in such a thing.

rupW6kp.jpg

Just as a final point, someone briefly mentioned to us recently that RSJ763 isn't actually the right plate for one of these, possibly due to it being a military vehicle. If you put the reg into the DVLA website, it brings up the correct vehicle with the correct year of manufacture but it tells you that the date of first registration was June 1976. Can anyone help shed some light on this weird discrepancy? 

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In years gone by, a good number of ex military stuff used commercially used to run unregistered with just a set of trade plates as a badge of legitimacy. The rules on this changed around the early 80s and everything that was still running got registered, usually with a Q plate. Some folks have since successfully re-registered stuff, as they passed into preservation, with an age related plate as long as they can prove its real age.

1976 is very early for a registration under these circumstances and going on the series used on this, I’d suspect that it was just re-registered with an age related plate with 76 being when the firm bought it back the second time? I’ve known AEC matadors - ex bus corporations with that series of registration and they would have been given this in the late 80s early 90s when the new private owners managed to prove its real age and get it off the Q they were registered in the 80s with.

 

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1 minute ago, rml2345 said:

Could it have been in forestry/off road use at some point? They had a tendency to use AWD military kit and cobble stuff together from bits.

The company on it is “W. Wood Tree Felling”, so yes. Interesting to know.

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9 hours ago, Microwave said:

If you put the reg into the DVLA website, it brings up the correct vehicle with the correct year of manufacture but it tells you that the date of first registration was June 1976. Can anyone help shed some light on this weird discrepancy? 

iv seen this happen when say you have an old car thats been off the road since before the DVLA was centralised

with it never being registered with the DVLA

then say you unearth it and want to register it with the DVLA, if you can prove the reg belongs to your car etc etc

then the DVLA will do so, but it will still say first registered wherever you did so with the DVLA rather then when it was made etc

see for example this Peel P50 that had been off the road since 1969 but in 2017 Stuart Cyphus got it registered with the DVLA and claimed its original registration number

Screenshot 2019-04-14 at 19.34.40.png

 

what im not 100% sure on is if say you have such a vehicle, but do have the old logbook for it, i dont know if it will say Date of first registration, by what the old 1960s logbook says or if it will say date of first registration when you register it with the DVLA in say 2019 or whenever

 

 

the 1976 thing might also just be an artifact of when the DVLA system was centralised then or computerised

I have seen some Invacars with such dates ie Made in 1973 but date of first registration as 1978 or such

image.thumb.png.0b1dde0390202d522da820f4f4de9432.png

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When a vehicle has it's original number transferred the DVLA will generally issue an age related plate from unissued stock, usually some remote part of Scotland as not many car were registered there. In this case SJ code is the Isle of Bute in origin.

Presume the same applies when an ex-military vehicle is registered for road use or a vehicle is imported.

SK is another common one being Caithness, look around any show and you'll see them everywhere including some pretty exotic stuff.

 

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It could be a custom bonneted conversion. The US-market VNs share some styling features with the EUropean models but the cabs are fundamentally a different design.  That looks like it's a modified FM/FH cab, similar to how this is made:

726.jpg

If it was a US market truck it would most likely have the 6x4 driveline too, only small distribution type trucks without sleeper cabs are 4x2. RHD also and Australia is the only other big Volvo RHD market - and they get sold European models.

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