Jump to content
SiC

1974 Dolomite Sprint

Recommended Posts

The Dynax stuff is good. I am going to try out POR15 on the 2 door, I've heard great things about it but where it will be exposed to UV it will need covering with another product.

You will be fine mate, seriously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

those sill trim clips

https://www.bresco.com/acatalog/Moulding-clip-for-9.8mm-moulding-flange-gap--and-4mm-panel-hole.-Chrysler-Avenger--Triumph-Dolomite--Vauxhall--Viva-HB-and-general-application.------70600P.html#SID=3

I think these are the fellers 30 of them for 7.49 + vat and shipping. Best remove all that you have on the car, treat the metal/rust and use new ones

Vactan is rust treatment stuff I use for surface rust, then overcoat with dynax. belt and braces

POR15 is pricey for my pockets.

That gearstick gaiter, looks similar to the stag item, made from tracing paper, lasted a month before it split again. make one out of a sheet of old leather

https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-715382

gearbox mounts are all made from cheese these days, oil leaking onto them seems to make them dissolve 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those clips look ideal for what I need, as I was thinking they probably need replacing due to being very brittle. 

Repro mounts seem to be the usual ongoing issue of remanufactured parts not being made to the right spec rubber wise. However someone in the TDC has found that a Volvo 740 mount can be made to fit without too much pain: https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=29990

Rear crossmember needs it's holes elongated and 4mm of washers to bring it around the same height. The rest just fits and apparently is night and day to noise transmitted through to the car chassis. 

Being made by one of the big automotive part manufacturers, the rubber actually is to a reasonably decent spec and far closer to the original than the much more expensive repro parts. 

I still have the issue that the engine seems rather rigidly attached to the car. Not sure if it's the replacement front mounts or the rear mount fallen through. Also noticed that if you push up and down on the centre bearing you get a clunk. Not a whole lot of travel does it but I wonder if the vibrations of the engine moving causes the noise too.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Busy ol' night tonight.

Started off by cleaning off some of the paint around the rusty front wing with a knott wheel, till I found good metal. The bit at the bottom went rusty like this in literally a couple of days. Not helped by the hot humid weather and rain.
f8db3a9927acb012066ff1673fecef85.jpg

So much filler on here! I eventually did find good metal and discovered that someone previously tacked on a replacement bottom half of wing.
3f1e71c6848dd31feb2d436d71000b80.jpg

I'm guessing self fabricated given the large quantities of filler. I then cut off along the tacked on panel. Then decided the sill end section will definitely need some work, so cut even more of the wing off.
daecf7d856de540806128810b588b80d.jpg

At this point it got to my 9pm cut off where I don't like to do much more noisy work to keep the neighbours sane. So I sprayed some rustoleum brilliant blue paint on - which is entirely the wrong colour. However it will hopefully stop the bare, clean metal going rusty in hours with the rain we're getting at the moment.
85553fc8e2345ecb3471f71aa69410b9.jpg

I then set on about replacing the gearbox mount with the Volvo one.

Supported the gearbox with the jack and then undid all the bolts. Was quite a fight to get the crossmember off, as the exhaust pipe was very much in the way. Dropping the gearbox down did help a fair bit to give enough clearance.
381b837bc9c2258ce298c2094c2b4780.jpg

Old mount actually didn't look too bad in my eyes. Certainly wasn't split or anything.
7190a314954ec95ef41c3e394a4847a9.jpg
f22fad83e4f97eb02140dd6fd20d8260.jpg

However as I already was at this point and I had a replacement mount in hand, it made sense fitting it's replacement.
883a4a5f410454db7e755111049254f0.jpg

Looking at what appears to be date stamps moulded into the rubber, I think this mount is actually still in full series production.
f61ac85eadeb76581deb576d9dd1e616.jpg

As the mount is a bit lower than the stock mount, I dug out a load of washers to make a spacer. These were actually originally the washers that I replaced when changing my MGB fuel tank. Nice and chunky so provided around 2.25mm per washer. I filed out the hole to fit the 12mm bolt they needed to fit through.
bc04972789bd3945a2e9722bae6ca79b.jpg
0afb68349814b9a73e965da922485046.jpg

The crossmember was in reasonably decent shape. I gave a good spray of brake cleaner to remove the old oil, grease and grime.
6f46e287d37d0c48353411ea9833b5ac.jpg

The new mount is slightly smaller than the stock mount around the mounting holes.
57aff5aab04a636fb0bfd19dcff6ecd9.jpg

Required half hours worth of filing to enlarge the slots to allow it to fit.
59e746ece8a04b1c546a8012d7b3ea94.jpg

Then put it all back together again. Found that if I put the mount in first like this:
a55643dfda75275b9882853f9948c354.jpg

There wasn't enough room to get the gearbox mount bracket attached. So ended up sliding the whole lot in but all undone. Right faff and required a bit of patience.
0239b1815d49363fd770b70f9e386d6f.jpg
8fe1f46891212c2b5d124769fd98036a.jpg

I'm happy how this has turned out. Not least that this mount feels good quality and a fair bit cheaper than the repro jobs.

Next job will be making some templates and cutting metal to fix the sill end piece. Debating whether to get a proper panel to do the wing, or fabricate something myself. It's not a terribly difficult shape or bend to do, but I don't know how well it'll come out. Not overly keen chucking a tonne of filler on it like the last person here did. Panels aren't terribly expensive but I'm not flush with cash right now - not least after buying this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That rust in the wing is an annoying find, but at the price isn't unexpected and is at least pretty easy to deal with.  Way better that than finding the floor is made of newspaper and filler.  At least you'll be able to sort it properly.

 

I'm absolutely sure I've seen that gearbox mount on other things too...

Don't honestly think I've ever driven a Dolomite now I'm thinking about it...never mind a Sprint...though I'm really curious to spend some time around the engine given its common origins to the Saab motor I've done many thousands of miles behind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I replaced the very soggy gearbox mount on the Toledo a few months ago with a standard item. Mine has the 1850 set up, so this will be a good option if needed again. nice work Si.

I would go TDC panel, time saved and all that, plus it's a perfect fit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work on the gearbox mount, I’m impressed by your dedication being outside working on cars at that time of night too!

That ‘repair’ someone did to the wing is terrible! Why go to the lengths of trying to fix it and weld it on like that!? You can see why it rotted though, doesn’t look like there’s any sort of protection inside the sill. That’s probably going to you a favour now though as there’s nothing worse than trying to weld but setting fire to all the old wax and underseal as you go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Zelandeth said:

That rust in the wing is an annoying find, but at the price isn't unexpected and is at least pretty easy to deal with.  Way better that than finding the floor is made of newspaper and filler.  At least you'll be able to sort it properly.

 

I'm absolutely sure I've seen that gearbox mount on other things too...

Don't honestly think I've ever driven a Dolomite now I'm thinking about it...never mind a Sprint...though I'm really curious to spend some time around the engine given its common origins to the Saab motor I've done many thousands of miles behind.

Thing is, this was rated as a A1 condition car by the Triumph Sports Six Club valuation around 6-7 yrs ago. I'm sure it looked it back then too with a fresh, gleaming paint job. What makes me wonder is how many show queens that carted to shows, would actually look like in bare metal? Would be really easy to spend 8k+ on a pristine example but then find the body is mostly tack welds and filler!

 

4 hours ago, purplebargeken said:

I replaced the very soggy gearbox mount on the Toledo a few months ago with a standard item. Mine has the 1850 set up, so this will be a good option if needed again. nice work Si.

I would go TDC panel, time saved and all that, plus it's a perfect fit.

This is where I found the info on the mount on: https://forum.triumphdolomite.co.uk/viewtopic.php?t=29990

Mount that I bought: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1x-Febi-Transmission-Mounting-22394/191737018560

Just happened to be the cheapest seller I could find at the time. You will need some repair washers or similar to shim out the gap a bit, otherwise the gearbox could end up too low. They need to have a 12mm hole (or file one into it)

 

4 hours ago, danthecapriman said:

Nice work on the gearbox mount, I’m impressed by your dedication being outside working on cars at that time of night too!

That ‘repair’ someone did to the wing is terrible! Why go to the lengths of trying to fix it and weld it on like that!? You can see why it rotted though, doesn’t look like there’s any sort of protection inside the sill. That’s probably going to you a favour now though as there’s nothing worse than trying to weld but setting fire to all the old wax and underseal as you go.

I kinda wish I didn't go poking on this bit so much! As it turned out not structural, it probably could have waited until after we (eventually) move and have more time/space to repair it. However it will need doing at some point anyway and it's one of the worst bits on the car. 

I do need to stop working late. Getting in from outside at 12:30am and then going to bed at 1am constantly isn't good for the health! Thankfully I'm on no fixed working hours, so I can saunter into the office at 10:30am today. But I still get woken up at 7am by Mrs SiC getting ready for work, so I'm in a bit of sleep debt this week. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which UJ in the prop? Or all of them?! Not really inspected the prop that much, apart from giving it a shove to see how much movement there was in it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience is that the TSSC valuations are strictly for insurance purposes, rather than a reflection of what anyone’s paying for most Triumphs. But I get your point, and I see vehicles advertised on the basis of these all the time.

 

Great work with the Sprint!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How is it going with the Dolly Si?
Rain has been stopping play over the weekend on any bodywork. :(

Yesterday I replaced the battery isolator. Seemed a simple job, but as usual it ends up being a bit more involved.

Disconnecting the terminal led to the earth wire breaking. To be fair it only had a couple of strands left connected.
5a1bd8ca924bcf90b58987e383775fb2.jpg

I recrimped a new piece on. I'd rather this be a ring crimp but I couldn't find one with a hole big enough.
9eceb1527d0c429e67d000066b49ce5b.jpg

I also took the time to fit an additional and heavier duty earth connection to the body.
a9bc4033ac1d1554cce2d3c499afc7ed.jpg

That location was previously occupied by the relay that I think drove a rear fog light. Not needed now as it doesn't have one and nor did it need one at this age.

The reason why I removed the isolator is that the knob was getting rather stiff to remove. Once removing the isolator it became clear why and why I don't like this style much.
19d1bece04cba8ddd6ae9507f9ca42ac.jpg
e79f8709d543a69dfd55be1e35cf2c82.jpg

You can see the plastic has melted from getting very hot. This is likely because it hasn't been making good electrical conduct and leading it to act as a resistor. A resistor passing energy through it will heat up and hence melting that knob. I don't really like the design of these as their contact surface area is pretty small - especially for the amount of current they need to pass when starting. Longer term I'll use a different type of isolator.

I also started feeding the wiring in to put an electrical oil pressure gauge before the weather turned in again. I bought a NOS Smiths job a while back, so will be nice to see how the engine is running. Should remove (or add...) any fears the banging is definitely not engine internal related. As a side note, the oil pressure switch connector crimp is pretty loose. Makes me wonder if the pressure switch was even working when vibrating through running. Will be able to see clearer once I've got it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting to see that as the The Invacar has something similar and I was wondering how well a connection it makes, but the isolator knob thingy on the invacar is female and it screws into the battery post IIRC, with the main chassis earth lead ending in a ring crimp that gets sandwiched between the 2

luckily there's no melting that Iv noticed, and given the relatively light load an invacar is I don't think I have too much to worry about, but I have found sometimes it can vibrate lose and suddenly you lose all electrics, (usually when you go to restart after stopping for a while) so something to keep an eye on there

but that's probably me being a wuss and not tightening it enough LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weather half decent tonight, so made some small progress.

 

Firstly I tried some paint I had mixed out to see the colour match. It is shit. Should be good enough to do the wheel arches though.

0a060722f0e7990cfb066e6d2e31c1d7.jpg

 

Next was chopping more metal out of this wheel arch. I eventually got to solid metal that isn't pitted.

Before

2cd89e5d815d2fd0b0f0a127416e0b1f.jpg

 

After

681b35ceb16d58aec7b4e5ef8a5c4245.jpg

e4596b912464791e531f60b4ed7e9d90.jpg

6aa8c79b4b6281dfcce8ba45ba14a944.jpg

 

This all looks complicated, but it's not that bad. Just many bits that make up this and will require quite a lot of sections to complete it. Will be fiddly for sure.

 

Next step on this area is to get the card out and start making templates. Then I can get the steel cut up and shaped. Welding on should be a relatively painless exercise - providing I don't catch the car alight.

 

Took some time to remove underseal off the drivers floor. There are a few holes in it, but I'm pretty sure I can get away without using a panel and fabricating it out of sheet steel. Won't be perfectly accurate but this isn't visible most of the time and it's quite a simple, flat area. At the moment it's in need of doing. If I did give a good stamp in this area, I'd have a Flintstones car for sure.

240bbf1fef985dceb674b2c317641ed2.jpg

 

Also this is going to be the first time I'm welding with interior, engine and other flammable things still in the car. On the Austin 1100 I had stripped anything remotely flammable out (apart from underseal), so could weld freely without fear of setting all the things alight. My plan is to stuff some fire blankets down in the wheel arch behind the holes to catch any splatter, sparks and flames.

 

Finally tonight I thought I'd have a look at the drivers front caliper to see the state of the pistons. The inside pad definitely has more material on than the outside. Pulled the pads out. This was quite a fight as the retaining pins were rusty and the pads were corroded enough on the side that it needed a pair of pliers to persuade it to come out.

 

Dust seals on the pistons appear intact

066019e1ca10bfd0fa3be18eedf9b755.jpg

 

Reasonable amount of meat still on these pads

f9124707c98a380cc1c636ae81ed5301.jpg

 

However they're pretty scruffy

d84be0ee582dd4669fe196f6485173ba.jpg

f491a94c2e7e2e79a5186300e56d3f47.jpg

 

Retaining pins aren't much cleverer either

cdddd79ddeb1c7044bf3b74448d05479.jpg

 

While I was at it, I stuck my piston retract tool in and wound till it clamped the disc. This allowed me to pump the pedal and check that both pistons move.

cf0ca14ab2d943adf5001a9457df3908.jpg

 

As both did and moved to a fair amount, I'm reasonably happy that they're in working order at the moment. Obviously not got a pot that seized solid. I'll do the otherside too and see how they perform. I may still need replacement calipers as the bleed nipple looks like it may give a fight. 2d9e4222362be40d3f0ac8da8def28f1.jpg

 

I gave the edges of the pads and pins a quick sand down. Went back together really well and without an issue. Key thing is that the pads just slid in, rather than having corrosion stopping them and snagging.

 

I do really like these fixed calipers. So much nicer to work on than the sliding calipers that so many modern cars use.

 

Discs have areas of quite a lot of pitting on. I can't imagine this will be helping give a smooth brake action. This could well be a cause of the front brake fluctuation advisory on its previous MOT.

 

If the brakes still give trouble and before I condemn the pads, discs and calipers, I may try new pads and fitting kit at least. Mintex ones are cheap enough to be worth a punt trying to see if it resolves some of the issues for now and give a bit more of a reassuring feel. Brake fluid is in need of an urgent change too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calipers seem to be on the 'save 'em' list after all which is good news, those disks could well do with replacing but as you have found out, they are a tad pricey. 

Cracking work so far!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some considered thoughts on this thread.

1.  I hope you're very proud of just how stuck in you're getting.  Fair bloody play.

2.  I am absolutely confident now that I have precisely zero interest in welding an old heap and will continue to use "Ken the Weld" up the road.

3.  I honestly don't think I will ever have the time to own something like this from the 70s.  It seems relentless!

 

Carry on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, BorniteIdentity said:
Some considered thoughts on this thread. 1.  I hope you're very proud of just how stuck in you're getting.  Fair bloody play.

It's mostly because I want to start using my new toy! Only actually driven it once and that was driving it back home. Kinda wished I didn't go poking so hard now and left it till I've moved. Then I'll have more time and can do it inside.

My fear originally it was structural. Only after I'd removed the paint and filler did I realise it's just the wing.

Gives me a chance to use the remaining welding gas up though!

14 hours ago, BorniteIdentity said:
2.  I am absolutely confident now that I have precisely zero interest in welding an old heap and will continue to use "Ken the Weld" up the road.

To be honest, right now I'd loved to have bought an absolutely mint example. However I'd have had to paid three times as much as I did. Even then it's possibly hiding bodges and could still have mechanical issues.

Being able to weld means I can afford stuff that I otherwise wouldn't have been able to.

14 hours ago, BorniteIdentity said:
3.  I honestly don't think I will ever have the time to own something like this from the 70s.  It seems relentless!

Carry on!

Admittedly this isn't the best example if you want a ready to jump in and go car. 80s and now 90s cars are suffering the same issues too!

10 hours ago, Tadhg Tiogar said:
Excellent 

Thankfully I have a proper colour match being done based on a sample I gave. Those lumps of filler with paint on came in useful!

The paint shop didn't have French Blue on the system. I think when he selected Triumph, it was coming up with the motorbikes.

This can was done as a match based on a book and the eye. Except I'm crap at doing such things.

Should be still alright for the wheel arches and underside though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Zelandeth
      Well I've been meaning to sign up here in forever, but kept forgetting. Thanks to someone over on another forum I frequent poking me about it recently the subject was forced back into my very brief attention span for long enough to get me to act on the instruction.

      I figure that my little varied fleet might bring you lot some amusement...

      So...we've got:

      1993 Lada Riva 1.5E Estate (now fuel injected, as I reckon the later cars should have been from the factory...).
      1989 Saab 900i Automatic.
      1987 Skoda 120LX 21st Anniversary Special Edition.
      1985 Sinclair C5.
      2009 Peugeot 107 Verve.

      Now getting the photos together has taken me far longer than I'd expected...so you're gonna get a couple of photos of each car for now, and I'll come back with some more information tomorrow when I've got a bit more time...

      Firstly...The Lada. Before anyone asks - in response to the single question I get asked about this car: No, it is not for sale. Took me 13 years and my father's inheritance to find the thing.



      Yes, it's got the usual rusty wings...Hoping that will be resolved in the next couple of months.







      Next, a proper old Saab. One of the very last 8 valve cars apparently, and all the better for it. I've driven two 16v autos and they were horrible - the auto box works sooooo much better with the torque curve of the 8 valve engine. Just wish it had an overdrive for motorway cruising...






      Next up a *real* Skoda...back when they put the engine where it belongs, right out the back. In the best possible colour of course...eye-searingly bright orange.





      Seat covers have been added since that photo was taken as it suffers from the usual rotting seat cloth problem that affects virtually all Estelles.

      Then we have possibly the world's scruffiest Sinclair C5...



      Realised when looking for this that I really need to get some more photos of the thing...I use it often enough after all! We have a dog who's half husky, so this is a really good way of getting him some exercise.

      Finally - again, I really need to take more photos of - we have the little Pug 107.



      Included for the sake of variety even if it's a bit mainstream! First (and probably to be the only) new car I've bought, and has been a cracking little motor and has asked for very little in return for putting up with nearly three years of Oxford-Milton Keynes commuter traffic, before finally escaping that fate when my housemate moved to a new job. Now it doesn't do many miles and is my default car for "when I've managed to break everything else."

      I'll fill in some more details tomorrow - I warn you though that I do tend to ramble...














    • By dome
      This evening I venture forth into hitherto unknown lands (Kirkintilloch) to collect my latest acquisition.

      Which, naturally, has issues.

      I have purchased my first line of defence.



      Which appears to have antigravity properties

      More will follow this evening...
    • By davehedgehog31
      I've had various threads on the go for different collections this year, but thought I'd condense my threads into one manageable thread to document my ham-fisted tinkering.

      At the turn of the year I was driving a nice, dependable, modern 2011 Peugeot 407 and no other vehicle. It was nice enough, but boring as feck. I'd bought it after a series of disastrous heaps in the awkward age bracket of being new and valuable enough to worry about but old enough to be fucked. The 407 was just too new, too bloated and dull. I had a hankering for old metal, my Mineral Oil withdrawal pangs were strong.

      From January I started looking, there were eBay bids, missed reserves, wasted trips from Gumtree and other such nonsense. I happened on an automatic Rover 216 GSI with one giffer owner from a year old. The chap was giving up driving at 93 years old and his grandson was moving it on. I bid, and failed. It was in London though, about 420 miles away so I wasn't all that bothered. Of course when he offered it to me for my losing bid after the winning buyer was a no show I said yes. I was on the Megabus down to that London overnight for about £15. I hung about in Liverpool Street station like a mad shivering jakey until my train out to the suburb for my first sight of the new steed. It was battered outside but had been well looked after. A frankly insulting amount of cash changed hands and I was away up the road.

      We had many adventures together, it was dependable and it whet my appetite for interesting old motors again and proved that the very bottom end of the market was navigable if I had the patience to wade through the sea of shit to find the odd pearl.



      The 407 was still on the fleet at this point but I was covering a lot of miles in the Rover, with a long commute though the fuel economy wasn't ideal. When a friend's mother was looking for a new diesel saloon to replace the faithful old Xsara she had a scheme was concocted. I sold the 407 to her and was on the hunt for an interesting replacement.

      When I was growing up my dad had a succession of hopeless shitters, indeed I was brought home from the hospital as a newborn in a brush painted Skoda Super Estelle. The best car he had was a red XUD Peugeot 405 with air conditioning and electric windows. So when I found a 1994 GTXD advertised by someone who could actually compose a car advert in the fashion you would expect of a human being educated to a Primary School level, I pounced.

      Of course I couldn't buy a car just down the road so it was on the train to Birmingham. First class no less. I stayed in an absolute flea pit of a hotel and drove up the road the next day. This was a proper bit of nostalgia and a really practical borderline classic car. It had been fastidiously maintained by the previous owner. Apart from there being a hole where there was once a stereo and the lack of working air con it was a pleasant drive home.

      Given their relative scarcity and how dependable this one has proven so far, it's a keeper, I'd struggle to part with it.



      Two cars just wasn't enough to worry about, so this Citroen C1 was acquired. Pure Aleppo spec. A camel can go for weeks, or months without stopping at a watering hole, the C1 has a similar thirst for Motor Spirit. Man maths were employed and worked out that it would easily* pay for itself.




      There have been further movements, I'll recap them shortly. I should probably do some work.
×
×
  • Create New...