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Anybody know the tyre pressures for a Westwood W8 ride on mower?

I have a PDF manual and can't find them in there. Googling gives me 10 PSi to 14 PSi general for mowers, but does any know the correct pressures for a Westwood W8? It is an early 1980s machine. It has different size tyres front to back a bit like a drag car!

Yesterday @Slowsilver  took some wheels off for me to take to the menders so we can cut the grass for the FoD event.

s-l1600 (6).jpg

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28 minutes ago, Floatylight said:

Any recommended ways of de yellowing headlights.

I'm planning of using wet and dry followed by polishing pad of the da polisher and some t cut..

Any views or recommendations?

If it’s French... make the headlights more yellow not less... 

 

(no helpful advice was available at this time) 

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On 8/15/2020 at 7:52 PM, Tenmil Socket said:

Bought my son a new (secondhand) iPhone as he dropped his. It’s on O2 network but his SIM card is EE and doesn’t work in the phone. Can anyone advise if I can get it to accept his SIM card somehow?

Ebay mate. I've done loads of galaxys on there.

 

Screenshot_20200905-091445_eBay.jpg

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On 9/5/2020 at 9:47 AM, Floatylight said:

No, Japanese, thank you for your input ?

I used Brasso wadding on the Ignis; they were cloudy and a little discoloured and they’re not perfect but a helluvalot better.

If they are very yellow see if the lens comes off the bowl easily, then coat in peroxide hair bleach, wrap in cling film and leave in the sun for a day. Rinse off thoroughly.

Google “Retrobrite”; it certainly gets the yellow out of opaque plastics

EDIT - Having a rummage through t’interwebs this morning, on some transparent and translucent plastics the yellowing may have run all the way through, and the Retrobrite technique mainly works on the outer surface. There are other chemical techniques available but involve nasty stuff such as sulphamic acid.

Edited by dozeydustman
Found more info
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This a very stupid question about a very stupid problem. 
 

The battery on my wife’s elderly diesel Saab is expiring. It’s a 019 job so bloody big and more importantly bloody expensive.

This being the case I decided I would ‘recondition it’. For those not familiar with this particular fools errand it entails tipping the acid out of the battery and filling the cells with a bicarbonate soda solution to break up sulphation then tipping the bicarb out and filling the battery with a new electrolyte formed with a Epsom Salts and distilled water solution. You then put the battery on trickle charge for a couple of days then I should imagine allows you to limp on for another couple of months before leaving your wife stranded somewhere and resulting in the mother of all bollockings.

So I’ve done it and so far escaped life changing chemical burns and disfigurment. The problem however is that I now have this bucket full of battery acid/bicarb mix to deal with.

I have so far slowly poured about 2.5kilos of soda crystals into the bucket. It fizzed angrily and threatened to overflow.

I expected I would get to the point where it stopped fizzing as I added the soda crystals but it never did. Do soda crystals fizz when you add them to water anyway?

Any guidance appreciated. My current plan is to buy another 2 kilos of soda crystals, tip them in gradually then leave the bucket at the bottom of the garden for a couple of months then gingerly kick it over.

TLDR just buy a fucking battery when your car won’t start.

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I don’t want to dissolve any cats or other creatures! I would have thought it should be pretty weak now I’ve hoyed all the soda crystals in but I’m not going to be sticking a finger in to check.

Thinking back to GCSE Chemistry I could really do with some Litmus paper but I’m fairly sure you can’t get at the local shops.

Reading further around the subject you can make a ph indicator solution out of a red cabbage which probably is the most cost effective solution.

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1 hour ago, jonathan_dyane said:

I don’t want to dissolve any cats or other creatures! I would have thought it should be pretty weak now I’ve hoyed all the soda crystals in but I’m not going to be sticking a finger in to check.

Thinking back to GCSE Chemistry I could really do with some Litmus paper but I’m fairly sure you can’t get at the local shops.

Reading further around the subject you can make a ph indicator solution out of a red cabbage which probably is the most cost effective solution.

You should be able to pick up PH strips from pet shops (think fish supplies) or hot tub places.

https://www.petsathome.com/shop/en/pets/searchterm?searchTerm=ph test strip&pageSize=24&resultType=1

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Your lack of fizzing is probably due to the low solubility of soda in water. 4 litres (a bucket?) can only dissolve about 1.2kg of sodium carbonate at 25C. Agitate the bucket with a long stick (slowly) and you will probably encounter the soda sitting at the bottom. Eye protection!

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Postscript.

 I couldn’t get any ph strips but there were red cabbages so I used the cabbage water to test the ph and I ended up needing another bag of soda to get it to the level where it was no longer a biohazard.

The battery? I got it charged up to 12.8 volts so I refitted it and guess what? It’s still fucked. So I did what I should have done in the first place, drove to Halfords and bought a new battery with a trade card. Car now starts better than it ever has in our custodianship.

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