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3 hours ago, Joey spud said:

50068226831_06003048cf_o.thumb.jpg.d6302ea21d638860380874aba24ba5f5.jpg

I have a soft spot for these old M+D Atlanteans and Fleetlines as they transported me to and from secondary school in the early eighties. This one was withdrawn from service in 1981 and moved onto an independent in Ramsgate and photographed here in '98.

FB_IMG_1706306701045.thumb.jpg.0a660e8a264f6cf93ce7b5f3cf6e3929.jpg

Fast forward twenty-five years and she is now sleeping in an overgrown yard south of Tonbridge with a fellow M+D Fleetline.

18057249149_ddcdffae23_o.thumb.jpg.34a99c7a53c6333a4d2ba0149ed14591.jpg

It seems such a shame that these once preserved and cherished buses have now been left to sink into the ground and get taken over by nature. 

I remember going to school on M&D Atlanteans in the 70s. They were quite old then I think. 

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6 hours ago, Joey spud said:

50068226831_06003048cf_o.thumb.jpg.d6302ea21d638860380874aba24ba5f5.jpg

I have a soft spot for these old M+D Atlanteans and Fleetlines as they transported me to and from secondary school in the early eighties. This one was withdrawn from service in 1981 and moved onto an independent in Ramsgate and photographed here in '98.

FB_IMG_1706306701045.thumb.jpg.0a660e8a264f6cf93ce7b5f3cf6e3929.jpg

Fast forward twenty-five years and she is now sleeping in an overgrown yard south of Tonbridge with a fellow M+D Fleetline.

18057249149_ddcdffae23_o.thumb.jpg.34a99c7a53c6333a4d2ba0149ed14591.jpg

It seems such a shame that these once preserved and cherished buses have now been left to sink into the ground and get taken over by nature. 

Sadly not uncommon. They’re likely too far gone by now, I would think. Might yield some useful spares though. 

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A bit of modern bus shite. A toddle off to Lichfield bus station (I go to all the best places) meant I could finally capture these things before they get sold off. Midland Classic have six Scania K230UBs with Irizar bus bodies. They also had six K250UBs with the same bodies (but have sold on three), meaning they had, at one time, all but two of the total production of that chassis/body combination.

Now, in coach form, is Scania/Irizar surprisingly pleasant and fairly common but why not the bus? Well, they were a heavyweight in the times when most operators were buying lightweight stuff. The deciding factor was the floorline at the back. See that masking on the side windows near the rear? Yeah, the seats really do go up at the back like that (to clear the longditudinal engine) meaning the headroom in this rather high set body was minimal. Oh yes, the view forward frm the rear seats (if you don't get vertigo on the way there) is of the back of the front destination box.  Really, they nedd to be experienced to be beieved. 

Not great then. Well the first six that Midland Classic bought were unique because of their short length. Think Dennis Dart sized, with only 24 seats but a full heavyweight bus. They were originally Heathrow airport buses and had large luggage racks at the front so they were taken out to increase the seating a bit but still, I dread to think how much fuel these things put away in a shift.YN64FWZ.thumb.png.0350fd368ee48743f5b69367708b1296.png

YN64FWW.thumb.png.897282e72842bf68f4eae1e4ce8d9098.png

YN64FWZYY67USB.thumb.png.4691015c7572bae4e5c1f7bcbb30fb45.png

YY67USBYN64FWW.thumb.png.84ff73edfbcbb7e4eaf2280d97ff0556.png

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23 minutes ago, cms206 said:

Went out a wander yesterday and got a nosy in here - Stockwell Garage had the largest single span concrete structure in Europe when it was built in the 1950s.

20240128_163019.jpg

I never tire of seeing pictures of Stockwell garage. Imagine how futuristic it must have looked in 1952.

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1 hour ago, Inspector Morose said:

A bit of modern bus shite. A toddle off to Lichfield bus station (I go to all the best places) meant I could finally capture these things before they get sold off. Midland Classic have six Scania K230UBs with Irizar bus bodies. They also had six K250UBs with the same bodies (but have sold on three), meaning they had, at one time, all but two of the total production of that chassis/body combination.

Now, in coach form, is Scania/Irizar surprisingly pleasant and fairly common but why not the bus? Well, they were a heavyweight in the times when most operators were buying lightweight stuff. The deciding factor was the floorline at the back. See that masking on the side windows near the rear? Yeah, the seats really do go up at the back like that (to clear the longditudinal engine) meaning the headroom in this rather high set body was minimal. Oh yes, the view forward frm the rear seats (if you don't get vertigo on the way there) is of the back of the front destination box.  Really, they nedd to be experienced to be beieved. 

Not great then. Well the first six that Midland Classic bought were unique because of their short length. Think Dennis Dart sized, with only 24 seats but a full heavyweight bus. They were originally Heathrow airport buses and had large luggage racks at the front so they were taken out to increase the seating a bit but still, I dread to think how much fuel these things put away in a shift.YN64FWZ.thumb.png.0350fd368ee48743f5b69367708b1296.png

YN64FWW.thumb.png.897282e72842bf68f4eae1e4ce8d9098.png

YN64FWZYY67USB.thumb.png.4691015c7572bae4e5c1f7bcbb30fb45.png

YY67USBYN64FWW.thumb.png.84ff73edfbcbb7e4eaf2280d97ff0556.png

But they do go “FAST” !! :D

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On 30/01/2024 at 16:47, artdjones said:

It might be the aftermath of one. In a real smog you wouldn't see anything more than a few feet away. Sometimes they were bad enough to be unable to see your hand at the end of your arm.

What was the normal LT response when it was really bad, everyone pull over and wait for it to lift?

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4 minutes ago, SunnySouth said:

What the normal LT response when it was really bad, everyone pull over and wait for it to lift?

I think the conductors walked in front with a torch, but that would only be for getting back to base.BLOG-people-walking-in-smog-creative-commons.thumb.jpg.c71d3ed874a904c38b9e1bc7d8502515.jpg

It was like this, but sometimes worse.

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somewhere on the internet is a picture of a Routemaster being scrapped by Aldenham themselves

and because it was done by themselves rather then just it being ripped apart with a mechanical grab, it was meticulously dismantled until every panel inner, outer, and every part was removed and all that was left was the bare monocoque frame of the Routemaster

it was actually quite beautiful  in a sad poetic way,  it looked like someone had made a Routemaster out of wire if that makes sense but I have never been able to find the photo again I wonder if anyone knows the photo?

IIRC it was/is on flicker but dont hold me to it

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1 hour ago, Inspector Morose said:

Dunno about RMs but have a couple of RTs instead.

ffef88537f2c98dd1cc8e35c453037c7-3509032314.jpg.27a2d8fea4d26d36f1dd7387153d609e.jpg

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did a bit more digging, and I think it was RM510 which was especially prepped in the manner it was for an Aldenham open day

found a couple photos of it, but not the specific one I saw of it which showed broadside in a diagonal bay...

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20 minutes ago, Mr Pastry said:

This one? 

Aldenham Bus Overhaul Works

 

aye, but from a better angle and a less noisy background so you could see the bus/frame itself quite well,, it in a bay and the photo was taken from some distance away and from a little bit of hight

and I dont recall it even having the the lower panels but perhaps im mistaken there

 

I just thought it was really interesting to see the frame of an RM, and really shows how they where very much the meccano set of buses, *everything* could be unbolted and removed

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Just now, Mr Pastry said:

Dont know, but aren't the inner panels part of the structure?

thats what made the photo so fascinating to me, is in even the most dilapidated RM or such in a scrap yard would still have its inner panels etc

but this RM in Aldenham was *just* a bare frame 

 

thats why I wanna find the photo again :) I wish I had saved it, its description was sadly fairly basic

something along the lines of "Routemaster being dismantled at Aldenham"

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22 hours ago, LightBulbFun said:

did a bit more digging, and I think it was RM510 which was especially prepped in the manner it was for an Aldenham open day

found a couple photos of it, but not the specific one I saw of it which showed broadside in a diagonal bay...

Any idea why it was being scrapped in the first place; crash victim?

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A bit of modern bus shite this evening. This is an Optare MetroDecker that is now owned by Diamond Bus in the West Midlands. Shite. you say? Oh yes. Sit down while I tell you a tale...

 

YJ70EWD.thumb.png.8c3e8976772192fdc0be756bf6bc1d6e.png

It sort of starts with another bodybuilder, East Lancs of Blackburn. They had been selling their double-deck body, the Olympus reasonably well. Unfortunately, in 2007, East Lancs ran out of money and called in the receivers. They were rescued by the Darwen Group, a company that magically appeared for the purpose of saving East Lancs, the day after it fell into receivership. Interesting timing.

Now the Darwen group, owned by Local entrepreneur Roy Stanley decided to purchase Leyland Product Developments, a splinter of the once monolithic Leyland empire, their skunkworks division but with more brown coats and ties. But Roy didn't stop there. In 2008 he set up another company (Jamesstan Investments) to purchase another struggling bodybuilder, Optare of Leeds. Somehow, the two companies (Darwen and Jamesstan) were somehow fused together and the whole shooting match was renamed Optare.

Optare hadn't got a double-decker body as their sole double deck, the Spectra was sold as a complete bus, albeit using a DAF chassis. Thus what was the East Lancs Olympus now became the Optare Olympus (via briefly the Darwen Olympus) and Optare now had a body to plonk on any chassis the customer wanted. 

Still with me? Good. Now what the hell has all of this got to do with the bus in the picture? Don't worry, it's getting there.

Now Optare did build other products. After purchasing the designs and production of the integral Metro Rider midibus from the defunct MCW, they used the frame design to build several single-deck models, focusing on lightweight and economy. It harboured the idea of producing an integral double-decker of its own making and with the reverse takeover and associated shenanigans settling down, a thorough redesign of their models was started. Firstly came the SoLo +. This was a complete restyle of their best-selling low-floor minibus (based upon the MetroRider frame once again). They had only just re-styled it the year before, producing the curvy SoLo SR but obviously fresh new company owners, fresh new designs and all that...

The styling was dramatic, to say the least, very square and Darth Vader-y. It definitely caused a stir when shown off for the first time at the end of 2008. What was also shown off for the first time was their new double-deck design, the Rapta. This took the severe SoLo+ design and made it a double deck. Striking was one word for it, it really didn't look like anything else on the road, soft friendly curves were eschewed for straight bodysides and stark angles and the front managed to look more Darth Vader-y than the small SoLo+. It was going to be a fully in-house built product (thanks to the help from the staff from Leyland Product Developments) with power from M.A.N or a hybrid driveline of some sort (interestingly, one of Roy Stanleys' other companies was the Tanfield group who were slowly metamorphosing into a producer of electric vehicles, amongst other things).

The reception for both products from operators was not what Optare expected, in fact, orders failed to materialise at all as those who would sign the order cheques were put off by the overly dramatic styling. Great, now what?

Back to the drawing board, that's what. The SoLo SR was given a reprieve and the two SoLo+ built were quickly and quietly disposed of. The Rapta hung around the factory for a few years, slowly disintegrating and revealing that behind the deeply tinted windows lay, well, very little more than a rolling shell. With all the drama of the launch, there really wasn't much substance behind the razzamatazz.

But Optare still harboured dreams of building their own integral double-deck bus. With the Rapta and SoLo+ fiasco over, funds were tight (especially after a move to a brand new factory in Sherburn-in Elmet)so the cupboards were rummaged through to see what could be rustled up. Starting with the Olympus body, an underframe was slowly built up underneath (thanks to those LDP folk) to make the body into an integral bus. The idea was to be a reverse MCW Metrobus where the body would be available to mount on other chassis but also could be bought as an integral product (the Metrobus was an underframe that could be a complete product or be bodied elsewhere). Lightness and economy were back in the plan so a tiny Mercedes four-cylinder engine and ZF Ecolife gearbox were used to propel the new bus along. Everything was done to make the underframe as light as possible to give the product class-leading running costs. 

Optare integral No.2 was to be launched as the Olympus integral and construction would start sometime around 2013. Ish. Even though the Olympus integral was ready (at least in prototype form), it was old and still looked like a past product from Blackburn and not the stylish product from a builder with a reputation for good-looking vehicles. The money was coming from yet another bit of the Leyland Empire. Ashok Leyland was once the Indian Subsidiary of the once huge Lancashire firm but had since gone on alone and made quite a good fist in building the right products for their market. Looking for something to spend their profits on, the cash-strapped Optare looked a good deal. Ashok needed something more than their very basic bus offerings (plus a way into other markets) and Optare needed the money - a match made in heaven. Slowly, over time, Ashok increased its shareholding of Optare until 100% was owned (note: this is a VERY simplified version of what went on with a slight bend in the actual timeline of events but you've tolerated me this far and I don't want to go on yet another tangent).

Optare hovered about a bit and then decided that the new underframe needed a new body with it. Styling, after the Rapta debacle was back on its usual curvy track and a number of new models had been created, using the styling of the SoLo SR as a starting point. It made perfect sense to make the new decker look as though it was part of the family. At the same time, the weight could be designed out of the new bespoke bodywork, meaning that the new bus would be far lighter than, not only the Olympus prototype but any other double-decker on the market. 

It took an age to get there (so did this piece) but by 2014 the new Optare MetroDecker was ready to launch. The underframe was the same one as used on the Olympus integral prototype but the body took weight-saving to heights seen only before on Lothian's lightweight Titans of the '60s (called monstrous masses of shivering tin at the time by someone who doesn't matter). Three demonstrators were built, along with two other proving models which were hawked around every operator, large and small to promote this new double-decker ultra-lightweight double-decker from Optare. Like the Rapata, potential customers were put off by Optare seeming to go just a bit too far. They saw the flimsiness as a weakness and a potential disaster waiting to happen and not the new way of drastically reducing fuel bills (maybe memories of the 150s and '60s lightweights still burned brightly in some operators' memories). It failed to sell. Big time.

There was one order. Reading actually liked what it saw when it tried one of the demonstrators and so ordered five with an upmarket specification for their Green Line route. Even then, Optare managed to screw things up with continuous delays and problems setting back delivery dates again and again until Covid came and gave Reading the excuse to cancel the order, after they had been built, over two years after the order was initially placed. Left with five buses, they were hawked around anyone willing to buy a new well-specced but unknown double-deck bus with a tiny engine and flimsy panels. Two were bought by Johnsons coaches of Henley in Arden for their route from Birmingham to Stratford upon Avon. Johnsons sold out its bus operations to Rotala Group and the bus fleet was absorbed into that of Diamond Bus.

One of five buses ordered but not delivered with a total production of (I think, including the prototypes) 10. Not that great, is it? Well...

In the past few years, the battery electric bus has slowly been getting good enough for operators to seriously consider large-scale purchases. True, the cost of the things is still astronomical but with dramatic long-term savings on fuel, and maintenance, plus a vast improvement in the workplace for all those who have to actually operate them, the electric bus is starting to look very attractive indeed. The biggest issue is weight, with a penalty of at least two tons over a normal diesel variant. More weight means fewer passengers able to be carried and that's not good. If only there was an ultra-lightweight double-decker out there that could be used as the basis of an electric bus.

It seems the MetroDecker is not such a dead duck after all. As a diesel bus? Probably, but slowly the MetroDecker is starting to attract orders. Okay, it's mostly London, a place that has firmly committed itself to electric propulsion but hey, any orders are good orders. You never know, someone else might buy some...

With rationalisation, Optare has now become Switch Mobility and looks after all of Ashok's EV requirements around the globe. It is intended that Switch will only sell Electric vehicles but with Diesel variants of the old models still capable of being built, they will still be sold under the Optare brand. Just don't expect any more deckers, this one took long enough.

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2 hours ago, Inspector Morose said:

A bit of modern bus shite this evening. This is an Optare MetroDecker that is now owned by Diamond Bus in the West Midlands. Shite. you say? Oh yes. Sit down while I tell you a tale...

 

YJ70EWD.thumb.png.8c3e8976772192fdc0be756bf6bc1d6e.png

It sort of starts with another bodybuilder, East Lancs of Blackburn. They had been selling their double-deck body, the Olympus reasonably well. Unfortunately, in 2007, East Lancs ran out of money and called in the receivers. They were rescued by the Darwen Group, a company that magically appeared for the purpose of saving East Lancs, the day after it fell into receivership. Interesting timing.

Now the Darwen group, owned by Local entrepreneur Roy Stanley decided to purchase Leyland Product Developments, a splinter of the once monolithic Leyland empire, their skunkworks division but with more brown coats and ties. But Roy didn't stop there. In 2008 he set up another company (Jamesstan Investments) to purchase another struggling bodybuilder, Optare of Leeds. Somehow, the two companies (Darwen and Jamesstan) were somehow fused together and the whole shooting match was renamed Optare.

Optare hadn't got a double-decker body as their sole double deck, the Spectra was sold as a complete bus, albeit using a DAF chassis. Thus what was the East Lancs Olympus now became the Optare Olympus (via briefly the Darwen Olympus) and Optare now had a body to plonk on any chassis the customer wanted. 

Still with me? Good. Now what the hell has all of this got to do with the bus in the picture? Don't worry, it's getting there.

Now Optare did build other products. After purchasing the designs and production of the integral Metro Rider midibus from the defunct MCW, they used the frame design to build several single-deck models, focusing on lightweight and economy. It harboured the idea of producing an integral double-decker of its own making and with the reverse takeover and associated shenanigans settling down, a thorough redesign of their models was started. Firstly came the SoLo +. This was a complete restyle of their best-selling low-floor minibus (based upon the MetroRider frame once again). They had only just re-styled it the year before, producing the curvy SoLo SR but obviously fresh new company owners, fresh new designs and all that...

The styling was dramatic, to say the least, very square and Darth Vader-y. It definitely caused a stir when shown off for the first time at the end of 2008. What was also shown off for the first time was their new double-deck design, the Rapta. This took the severe SoLo+ design and made it a double deck. Striking was one word for it, it really didn't look like anything else on the road, soft friendly curves were eschewed for straight bodysides and stark angles and the front managed to look more Darth Vader-y than the small SoLo+. It was going to be a fully in-house built product (thanks to the help from the staff from Leyland Product Developments) with power from M.A.N or a hybrid driveline of some sort (interestingly, one of Roy Stanleys' other companies was the Tanfield group who were slowly metamorphosing into a producer of electric vehicles, amongst other things).

The reception for both products from operators was not what Optare expected, in fact, orders failed to materialise at all as those who would sign the order cheques were put off by the overly dramatic styling. Great, now what?

Back to the drawing board, that's what. The SoLo SR was given a reprieve and the two SoLo+ built were quickly and quietly disposed of. The Rapta hung around the factory for a few years, slowly disintegrating and revealing that behind the deeply tinted windows lay, well, very little more than a rolling shell. With all the drama of the launch, there really wasn't much substance behind the razzamatazz.

But Optare still harboured dreams of building their own integral double-deck bus. With the Rapta and SoLo+ fiasco over, funds were tight (especially after a move to a brand new factory in Sherburn-in Elmet)so the cupboards were rummaged through to see what could be rustled up. Starting with the Olympus body, an underframe was slowly built up underneath (thanks to those LDP folk) to make the body into an integral bus. The idea was to be a reverse MCW Metrobus where the body would be available to mount on other chassis but also could be bought as an integral product (the Metrobus was an underframe that could be a complete product or be bodied elsewhere). Lightness and economy were back in the plan so a tiny Mercedes four-cylinder engine and ZF Ecolife gearbox were used to propel the new bus along. Everything was done to make the underframe as light as possible to give the product class-leading running costs. 

Optare integral No.2 was to be launched as the Olympus integral and construction would start sometime around 2013. Ish. Even though the Olympus integral was ready (at least in prototype form), it was old and still looked like a past product from Blackburn and not the stylish product from a builder with a reputation for good-looking vehicles. The money was coming from yet another bit of the Leyland Empire. Ashok Leyland was once the Indian Subsidiary of the once huge Lancashire firm but had since gone on alone and made quite a good fist in building the right products for their market. Looking for something to spend their profits on, the cash-strapped Optare looked a good deal. Ashok needed something more than their very basic bus offerings (plus a way into other markets) and Optare needed the money - a match made in heaven. Slowly, over time, Ashok increased its shareholding of Optare until 100% was owned (note: this is a VERY simplified version of what went on with a slight bend in the actual timeline of events but you've tolerated me this far and I don't want to go on yet another tangent).

Optare hovered about a bit and then decided that the new underframe needed a new body with it. Styling, after the Rapta debacle was back on its usual curvy track and a number of new models had been created, using the styling of the SoLo SR as a starting point. It made perfect sense to make the new decker look as though it was part of the family. At the same time, the weight could be designed out of the new bespoke bodywork, meaning that the new bus would be far lighter than, not only the Olympus prototype but any other double-decker on the market. 

It took an age to get there (so did this piece) but by 2014 the new Optare MetroDecker was ready to launch. The underframe was the same one as used on the Olympus integral prototype but the body took weight-saving to heights seen only before on Lothian's lightweight Titans of the '60s (called monstrous masses of shivering tin at the time by someone who doesn't matter). Three demonstrators were built, along with two other proving models which were hawked around every operator, large and small to promote this new double-decker ultra-lightweight double-decker from Optare. Like the Rapata, potential customers were put off by Optare seeming to go just a bit too far. They saw the flimsiness as a weakness and a potential disaster waiting to happen and not the new way of drastically reducing fuel bills (maybe memories of the 150s and '60s lightweights still burned brightly in some operators' memories). It failed to sell. Big time.

There was one order. Reading actually liked what it saw when it tried one of the demonstrators and so ordered five with an upmarket specification for their Green Line route. Even then, Optare managed to screw things up with continuous delays and problems setting back delivery dates again and again until Covid came and gave Reading the excuse to cancel the order, after they had been built, over two years after the order was initially placed. Left with five buses, they were hawked around anyone willing to buy a new well-specced but unknown double-deck bus with a tiny engine and flimsy panels. Two were bought by Johnsons coaches of Henley in Arden for their route from Birmingham to Stratford upon Avon. Johnsons sold out its bus operations to Rotala Group and the bus fleet was absorbed into that of Diamond Bus.

One of five buses ordered but not delivered with a total production of (I think, including the prototypes) 10. Not that great, is it? Well...

In the past few years, the battery electric bus has slowly been getting good enough for operators to seriously consider large-scale purchases. True, the cost of the things is still astronomical but with dramatic long-term savings on fuel, and maintenance, plus a vast improvement in the workplace for all those who have to actually operate them, the electric bus is starting to look very attractive indeed. The biggest issue is weight, with a penalty of at least two tons over a normal diesel variant. More weight means fewer passengers able to be carried and that's not good. If only there was an ultra-lightweight double-decker out there that could be used as the basis of an electric bus.

It seems the MetroDecker is not such a dead duck after all. As a diesel bus? Probably, but slowly the MetroDecker is starting to attract orders. Okay, it's mostly London, a place that has firmly committed itself to electric propulsion but hey, any orders are good orders. You never know, someone else might buy some...

With rationalisation, Optare has now become Switch Mobility and looks after all of Ashok's EV requirements around the globe. It is intended that Switch will only sell Electric vehicles but with Diesel variants of the old models still capable of being built, they will still be sold under the Optare brand. Just don't expect any more deckers, this one took long enough.

I’ve seen people write less for a PhD!

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58-year old bus driver murdered in Elgin bus station last night by a 15-year old.

We've a few Elgin drivers down here in London. The mood in the hotel is quite sombre.

 

Rest easy driver, we'll take it from here.

 

https://news.stv.tv/west-central/teenage-boy-arrested-over-death-of-stagecoach-bus-driver-in-elgin-moray?fbclid=IwAR300yL_sSSOqva64aQfkTc_HiiDkDGWY64_28Vnj-1yxB6EsCGQn1-22Bk

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Well, another three weeker in London done;  another decent spell and very few problems, though my first shift (first run!) back saw another curtailment unlocked on the 462, at Hainault, The Lowe - also the terminus for the N8 which is an absolute fucking monster of a route.20240115_170210.thumb.jpg.1e20997799254fde133d4c66905978c0.jpg

Spent the majority of this trip on midibus routes; think I only did one shift on the 145 and two on the 62, the remainder of the trip split between 167s and 462s.

The trip was not entirely uneventful... 20240201_195251.thumb.jpg.1dbd1bf0b8125c5c3027f5ff52868e54.jpg

... with 36669 deciding it had enough on my penultimate shift, before dumping all of it's coolant over the engine on the Cranbrook Road in Ilford. 36657 did the honours as a replacement, unlocking another curtailment in the process; Barkingside, Fullwell Cross.20240201_212647.thumb.jpg.a83c5164234e20e97a730689378a2ee3.jpg

Final bus of the trip was 36663 on Friday evening.

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A sad loss to report is of our last old shape Enviro 200, written off by a van in Chigwell. Due to it's age it was on it's last year on TFL work, so it won't see the road again; it went like stink and the heaters were volcanic. Genuinely quite sad about this one.20240122_201511.thumb.jpg.4f0109b2cb94d34f617bd7a365da8041.jpg

 

A handful of other shots to complete this report of stuff seen on the hop.

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27 minutes ago, cms206 said:

A sad loss to report is of our last old shape Enviro 200, written off by a van in Chigwell. Due to it's age it was on it's last year on TFL work, so it won't see the road again; it went like stink and the heaters were volcanic. Genuinely quite sad about this one.20240122_201511.thumb.jpg.4f0109b2cb94d34f617bd7a365da8041.jpg

surely the Autoshite thing is to buy it back from the insurance company or whoever, and do an epic collection caper of sorts in it back up to Scotland no? :) :mrgreen:

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2 hours ago, LightBulbFun said:

surely the Autoshite thing is to buy it back from the insurance company or whoever, and do an epic collection caper of sorts in it back up to Scotland no? :) :mrgreen:

A lot of larger bus companies effectively self insure, I know pre Go Ahead our excess was well into 5 figures though I've no idea what it is now, though if it was the van driver at fault their insurance company will have to pick up the tab.  We had a bus written off a number of years ago by a 4x4 out near Hornsea that lost control on a bend doing over 80mph and hit the bus head on, there was as much damage in terms of money to the 4x4 as the bus and our claim against them was well into 6 figures. There was talk of the driver being prosecuted but I don't know the outcome.

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