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The Yamaha Diversion. What to look for?


warren t claim

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LHM leaks, comedy door locks and HGF.

 

'Citareobics': Put the car in 'high' setting, open the door and watch the car rise. Move to central setting, then low and repeat the excercise whilst all the whil looking for suspension fluid (LHM) leaks.

Make sure suspension, steering and brakes are ok. Steering is usually the first to go (they all work off the LHM) and will start feeling heavy where it shouldn't do. Dip your finger into the LHM tank, the fluid should be at your finger tips and clean.

The FDV should tick every ten-fifteen seconds (will double check that as can't remember the exact amount offhand) and the suspension should be supremely comfortable on a run, take in a few known rough roads to check this. Spheres shouldn't break the bank but can be awkward to get off.

 

Have a look in the header tank/radiator: 'fizzing' (bubbling) can mean the h/g can be on the way out.

 

Door locks, trim and general build quality can be bloody comical at times.

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Are the HDi models a better bet then? :?

 

Not neccessarily, as above veg oil friendliness (if Bosch pump) is for winners and to be fair the 1.9Td is no slouch once you start giving them some welly.

They're just about to come out of that 'unloved' era that old cars go through now too so a decent one would be a good bet as a daily runner.

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Main thing to check for is the condition of the front suspension strut tops. Water ingress can happen underneath which causes the mountings to rust and then give way. Normally this happens when going over a speedbump or something, and you end up with two (or one) suspension struts spearing the bonnet.

 

Also has an issue with the fan heater as weirdly its runs off a signal from the ignition switch. Just check that the fan motor and heated rear window work as they both run on the same circuit.

 

Do the obvious regarding the suspension up and down to make sure it works, and check for any LHM leaks under the bonnet.

Check for bounce on the suspension, but thats normally just the spheres which is an easy change.

 

Rust wise as well check the rear panels behind the back doors (forward of the wheels) as they can go there.

 

My Xantia has been one of the most reliable cars I have ever owned, and there is lots of advice on the "Frenchcarforum" if you have any questions or need any parts. Just be careful as its a dangerous route. Not many cars on the road today that have such a good ride, and are quite easy to work on. You could become hooked and then there are V6's and the Activa;s to tempt you. :D

 

I'm used to it now, but the brakes can take a while to get used to as I remember when I drove my first Xantia a while ago, they seemed very on or off. Still safe but just not as much progression as you may be used to.

 

The only other thing that can cause as issus is the clutch pedal cable which is held in place by a plastic clip that can snap. Cheap part, but suposedly an absolute swine to change.

 

Hope alll of the above may be of some use to you.

 

Finally there are loads out there so if there is anything you are not happy with, keep looking.

 

Cheers

 

- Dave -

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Crusty strut tops.

 

Clutch slipping or biting high

 

Imminent HGF (not terminal, but a PITA)

 

Rust in rear of sills (seems to be the first place they go as well as strut tops)

 

Hard ride, reluctance to sit up, jerky rise/fall LHM leaks around the rear HC ( front seems less prone).

 

Comedy interior plastic trim.

 

Comedy electrics caused by tin foil French connections in the loom - most prone to going ape shit is the interior fan and the Bitron unit controling the rad fans

 

Otherwise not bad cars for the money.

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All of them have Bosch pumps so no worries about veg friendliness. Not that buying new veg is especially good value.

 

I would like a Xantia TD very much, I test drove a late one a couple of years ago and liked it, but it was a bit much for a car with nearly 200k miles. I'm surprised that poor build is mentioned as that one seemed very solid.

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As the title says really.

 

Time permitting I'm off to have a look at a 1.9TD (non HDi) tomorrow and I was wondering what to look out for.

 

It will be quite low, unless run recently, and have a double arrow sign on the bonnet or grille. The Citroen name badge on the boot will be a giveaway. Look out also for Jewish spark plugs and a primered wing.

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All of them have Bosch pumps so no worries about veg friendliness. Not that buying new veg is especially good value.

 

I would like a Xantia TD very much, I test drove a late one a couple of years ago and liked it, but it was a bit much for a car with nearly 200k miles. I'm surprised that poor build is mentioned as that one seemed very solid.

 

Ah, you learn something every day! I always thought (wrongly it would seem) that they were like the BX and could be fitted with either pump. Build quality issues really were a problem at one time and would guess that perhaps only the decent ones survived ad a bad one would be enough to turn Mother Theresa into a gun toting lunatic.

 

If anyone wants a really good driving experience try lobbing a 1.9TD into a BX, they go exceptionally well and have masses of torque.

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Bit late now you've seen the thing but for general ref. the heater matrix can leak and it a proper PITA to change out as the dashboard is a single piece that ALL has to come off to get to the matrix.

 

I'm dreading this in mine...

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Bit late now you've seen the thing but for general ref. the heater matrix can leak and it a proper PITA to change out as the dashboard is a single piece that ALL has to come off to get to the matrix.

 

I'm dreading this in mine...

 

207203_152802934783610_100001617149234_346199_1825916_n.jpg

This is Faibienne, she is bulding a new Citroen C8, she starts with the heater matrix and carefully assembles the rest of the car round it.

She makes sure that she uses the Kwolity Russian heater matrixes made out of three year one week steel. Guaranteed to not leak for three years and one week. How Faibienne laughs as she goes to the Bar Tabac after work at the thought of funny Englishmen taking their car to bits.

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After my unsuccessful attempt to buy a Xantia I happened upon a tidyish Yam 600 Diversion.

 

I know these are as dull as dishwater and something of a Suzuki Bandit that John Major would sell you but it has loads of tax a test with an asking price of about £550.

 

Anyone got any experience of these or can suggest a decent alternative for similar money?

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Pleasant enough bike to ride - not the most exciting machine around, as you say, but adequately quick, handle adequately well and quite comfortable, and I found it lighter and easier to handle at low speed than a 600 Bandit. Cam chain rattle is a common problem, together with crap '90s Yamaha finish, but they're reasonably reliable and bits are quite cheap. I would imagine the S with the half fairing would be more relaxing as a long-distance bike - mine was an unfaired version and got a little tiring on long hauls.

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I knew a guy who had an original 600 Divvy on pre-order. Virtually creaming himself waiting for the day he could pick it up from Shirlaws. It was probly the first one in Aberdeen, back in '93. The bike was as boring as he was weird; the funny thing was, it occurred to me that he was probly typical of the kind of anal retentive monomaniac who'd like a bike that Yamaha claimed as some kind of ultimate, because it would be every bike for everyman...

However, somewhat down the line, I can appreciate that the Divvy probly makes an excellent cheap runner. It's not really possible to thrash them (he wouldn't give me a go of his, but he let my mate Stuart have a go. Stu confirmed that wheelies and general hooliganism weren't on the cards), so high commuting miles will possibly be the death of them. Having said that, it seemed like quite a sturdy kind of bike. Hefty for what it is tho', so I'd be checking the frame bearings/bushes. Any Hornet/Bandit you find at that price is quite likely to be at least 140% worse; thus bringing me back round to the point that it's the sensible, logical choice.

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