Jump to content

The mystery of the 100 mile FE Victor


Dick Longbridge
 Share

Recommended Posts

19 minutes ago, motorpunk said:

Why not check if the odometer is bust to start with? I'll bet it is. Then it's just another old car previously owned by a pensioner, as cold as that sounds. 

Nope. The interior says it all. 

Screenshot_20230123_213725_Chrome.thumb.jpg.7a9d3326158d6baa6e2286efc622dc05.jpg

 

"The pristine and as-new 1974 Vauxhall Victor FE, which is reported to have been saved by someone else who removed it from the rotting garage the original owner stored it in, has recently arrived at The Great British Car Journey in Ambergate with less than 100 miles on the clock, and the low mileage is attracting the most interest, so officials at the attraction have gone out to the public using social media to try and get more information.

The car was discovered following the death of the owner - a Mr. Milner who bought the car in the Summer of 1974 from Mercury Garage in Ilkeston. Six years later, it was taken to Derby to undergo rustproofing treatment after which it is thought that the car was never driven again and merely stored away.

After arriving in Ambergate, a raft of spare parts, a Haynes manual and seven empty fuel containers were found in the boot of the vehicle, but have been left exactly as they were found.

The social media post about the car attracted a variety of responses, one suggesting that the fuel crisis of the 70s peaked around the time the car was purchased, and the owner may have considered that he could not afford to run it due to prices having remained high and to await them coming back down again, whilst another wondered whether the owner had been on extended military service so didn't use the vehicle for that reason.

Explaining its continuing pristine condition, Richard Felkin, who discovered the Vauxhall in storage, said that all chrome and light fittings had been removed and stored in the car whilst what couldn't be removed was covered in order to protect it."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’m guessing it would be something like he’d bought the car then was ill and couldn’t drive for a period, laid it up but then never got round to driving again. There was definitely intent at some point to come back to it with him taking such care to store the trim. Could have very easily gone the other way if the garage had leaked, they’d be bringing it out on a shovel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reminds me of that old couple I read about in Classic Ford Magazine years ago who bought a brand new 280 Ford Capri as an investment, drove it home and put it in the garage and never used again. 
 

Around 2004 the car was recovered from the Garage, taken to a Ford Main Dealer ( the dealer that supplied the car originally) for a service and a clean, the Capri was then driven back to the couple’s home and put back in the rebuilt garage to never be used again. 
 

think the mileage had just turned over to 15 

this was in a 2004 edition of Classic Ford I have no idea what happened to the Capri
 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, sierraman said:

I’m guessing it would be something like he’d bought the car then was ill and couldn’t drive for a period, laid it up but then never got round to driving again. There was definitely intent at some point to come back to it with him taking such care to store the trim. Could have very easily gone the other way if the garage had leaked, they’d be bringing it out on a shovel.

 

Either that or the guy had some kind of hoarding issue; the condition of the garage and the "seven empty fuel containers" makes me wonder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...