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Keeping a classic outdoors in the winter


Gentil79
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2 minutes ago, Gentil79 said:

it’s not always a one size fits all solution.

A one size fits all solution is exactly what your video is suggesting though.

Drilling holes in the floor works very well if you drill them in the right place.

If the car is so valuable that you don't want to do that, why don't you rent a garage for the winter and look after it properly?

 

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I think there was some chat about dehumidifiers on here last week. I try leave a ‘passive’ dehumidifier in any car which is sat for a while. Just remember to empty it before you drive off!  
 

I have a garage but it’s very damp. When I’ve had a car in there I’ve chucked a tarp over it to keep the condensation drips off. 

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Drilling holes into your footwells is bodgy as fuck.  

Maybe Gentil doesn't want to pay extortionate costs to put it in a garage? 

Have you seen the costs of most storage places and garage rentals? 

My experience of covers is mixed.  A good fitting, secure and breathable NEW cover will not turn the car into a pile of oxide in 6 months, provided the car is absolutely minty clean and dry before tucking in. But after a couple of winters they're done. As for cheap covers- absolutely pointless. 

It's a compromise but I would be putting a cover on rather than allowing water to piss into the car or bodge fucking holes into it. 

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I only have one garage, and currently four cars which in an ideal world would be kept under cover.  The Innocenti (touch wood) currently appears to be fairly watertight, and has also hitherto proven remarkably rust-resistant for a 30-year-old low-volume Italian car.  The Visa lets a very small amount of water into the driver's footwell, but that has no carpets and there's a bung in the floor I can take out if need be so I'm not overly worried about that.  The Volvo however is not watertight at all - I haven't worked out exactly where the rain is getting in to the front passenger footwell, I suspect it may be from several places.

I had a car cover over it last year, but even when clamped down with additional bungee straps it still used to flap around in the wind, and when it was blowing a gale it'd be loud enough to keep me awake at night.  This year I've bought a large windscreen cover which I'm hoping will do the trick without having to cover the whole car.  I'd love to rent another garage but they're few and far between around here and as with everything else the prices have gone a bit silly recently.

The Renault 6 is nowhere near watertight either, but that's in the garage so that's one less to worry about.  Annoyingly the Toyota is currently letting in water as well, despite me having fixed the rear window regulator - I think the door seals might be a bit dodgy, next time we get heavy rain I'm going to have to spend some time sat in the back of the car trying to spot where it's coming in.  Otherwise I could just do what I did before and run Gorilla tape over all the seals - that kept it dry for a year or two last time I did it.

I've tried dehumidifiers in the past, but I don't really find they do anything worthwhile, especially in cold weather.  A Carcoon would be nice, but they're not exactly cheap.  The other option I considered was to buy a LWB van, stick the Renault 6 and the boat in the back of that for the winter and then the Volvo could have the garage - again though, van prices have gone a bit daft so I'm not sure that's going to be a viable option.

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1 hour ago, Gentil79 said:

Well, I can’t replace them until spring (one of them still out of stock) and I’m not going to drill floors because water can also get into places that are not visible.

it’s not always a one size fits all solution.

If you are replacing the seals in spring why don't you just use a decent* amount of windscreen sealer on it just now?

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2 hours ago, Gentil79 said:

So what would you do if the seals are perished and let water in like mine?

A cover will exacerbate the problem. Although far from ideal, stick some silicone around the worst areas to keep the bulk of the water out. I'd also pull the carpets/sound deadening out, pop some drain plugs in the floor and let any water entering the cabin straight out again.

Edit: Your post at the start of the thread seems completely different to the one most of us initially responded to...? 

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I would like to clarify everyone that I’m not here to tell everyone to start using car covers. I’m using one at the moment due to the issue with seals and the fact that I’m unable to get a garage for the time being.  It also conceals the car from public view.
I appreciate that many of you are against it, but you have to consider that many car owners disagree as well and I think everyones point of view need to be considered. Like everything, there are arguments against and in favour and it also depends on everyone’s personal circumstances. The use of the car cover is temporary and for this winter only.

Using a silicone sealant was considered, but I was unable to trace some leaks. So, in order to make my life easier when replacing the seals and having to clean the old sealant, I though of using the cover.

In regards to the condition to the paint, it isn’t great anyway as the car has spent a considerable time outside in Portugal (hence the perished seals) and the dash is badly damaged because of it.

 


 

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59 minutes ago, loserone said:

Good luck with that 👍if it works for you then great.

 

Sorry, I hadn't appreciated that this was more a plug for your video than a discussion on a forum.

Hahah Goes both ways really. It’s good to know everyone’s point of view on what it seems a very divisive subject 😄

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I’m also not a big cover fan. A light one if the car goes in the garage. I also feel guilty leaving something that isn’t used a lot outdoors all winter.

 

My old bus (A 1993 320i) has been garaged from new, and not used as a daily. Fortunately there’s no corrosion underneath, and I plan to keep it that way. Means it stays in the garage all winter usually. That’s also when I can get jobs done as I don’t need to use it, and can deal with it being in bits for some time.

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30 minutes ago, Gentil79 said:

Just looked it up. Sound good, but how good is that to remove when I finally replace the seals? That’s what put me off using silicon seal.

Captain Tolley's cure softens and expands when it gets wet so if you need to remove it you can. You won't shift it while it is dry. 

I used it a few years ago on a particularly crispy rear window seal on my P4 (P4 rear windows are difficult to fit and seal) and it worked really well, no leaks even when outside at the moment.

It took a few applications to 'build up' in the gaps, but as it is white when applied (dries clear) you can see where it has and hasn't got to.

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On 11/24/2022 at 11:39 AM, horriblemercedes said:

Thanks, it'd be great if you'd have a look. Mine cost me about that and I've had it a while now, so they might well be the same cover. I can't remember the name on it, but there is a tag somewhere on it with a manufacturer name

It was made by Custom Covers. Its actually for a 987 but fits my 986 ok.

Porsche Boxster 987 Tailored Half Cover - Black (2005-2012) (ukcustomcovers.com)

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In the past I've kept all my classics out over winter. However last year my Trev being fibreglass developed acne. Apparently water can get inside and expend when it freezes causing lots of microbubbles. I rent a garage but the floor feels wet so reluctant to keep anything in it over winter as I can't imagine that'll do underneath any good. Would putting some waterproof membrane laid on too and parking on that help do we think?

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I’ve experimented with covers in the past and not been totally convinced, I tend not to bother these days with them. On a public road they also attract attention.

I think the @Six-cylinder Toledo had had a cover on it at some point as it had abraded the paint on the corner of the roof, and the edge of the rear wing from memory.

I’m also a big fan of bilt hamber  ub and s50 to attack old cars with in preparation 

 

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