Jump to content

Scrubworks Fleet: 1990 Mercedes 190D


Scrubworks
 Share

Recommended Posts

16 minutes ago, Scrubworks said:

I've been doing a little bit of research on that subject, and found a website written by a guy who's been rebuilding diesel pumps for 40 years or so. He actually lists the available pump types on most cars, and grades their suitability for use with veg oil. Most older diesels seem to have a rotary style pump, which apparently is very dependable (eg, Volkswagen TDI engine), but can eventually give up if pushed too hard. However, he reckons that the inline style of injection pump is nigh-on indestructible and will cope with veg whatever the weather. Guess which type of pump old Mercs use? 😁

IMG_20211125_100638.jpg

IMG_20211125_114903.jpg

My understanding is the Bosch inline injection pumps are lubricated by the engine oil not the fuel you put in the tank.

The only issue i had when i started using veg oil in my 190d was the fuel delivery seals on the injection pump started leaking (o rings & copper washers) which you can get from Mercedes for about 15 quid a set. You will need a  splined socket to remove the 5 nozzles on the top of the injection pump to do this fiddly but easy job (tweezers required).

Your car is really going to be a baby S class with all that sound deadening installed. Top work.

Sainsburys have veg oil at £1 a litre (3 litre bottles) at the moment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The man from AVG windscreens came today, at 8:30 in the freezing morning no less, and set to it. Despite the cold, he told me he enjoyed doing it as he hadn't done a W201 screen in years. Figures.

IMG_20211125_100638.thumb.jpg.2bd9946fc8c830553482f6ca97df6368.jpg

IMG_20211125_114903.thumb.jpg.71a65937a43312fe8e11a73e3177c148.jpg

The new screen is in, and it looks super sharp. Unfortunately it doesn't have the top tint band that the factory screen does, nor does it have the very slight green tint to the whole glass that all the other glass in the car has. I was a bit disappointed by that, but now that it's in, it shows such clarity that you can't even tell there's glass there in the first place. The optical illusion will no doubt disappear after a bit of use and weather, but it should definitely help with night-time visibility, which was the main goal of this project all along. If you're in the Bucks/Beds area, I definitely recommend AVG Windscreens, they did a top job.

In other news, the car's switch to a vegan diet had the predictable side effect of loosening 30 years of gunk built up in the fuel lines. This has caused three of the injectors to spray diesel outside the engine, as well as in it. The car still runs fine, it just leaves a nice puddle of diesel wherever you park it. The braided rubber fuel return lines also have sprung several leaks, so those will be replaced. As for the injectors, I've actually been waiting for an excuse to have them rebuilt with these:

IMG_20211126_144449.thumb.jpg.9ee5af7c3432828ff76eabcc7e805fba.jpg

Monark nozzles, overnight parts from Germany. They are completely redesigned nozzles for the OM601/2/3 injectors, developed using the knowledge gained from the last 30 years of diesel development. These nozzles, according to Daddy Kent, are a win win; they improve power, fuel economy and emissions, and, more importantly for me, greatly improve cold-starting and general running with vegetable oil. The only real downside I can seem to find is the £150 cost for five nozzles from the Fatherland, which doubles the cost of my injector rebuild; £30 per injector from Diesel Bob.

IMG_20211126_144408.thumb.jpg.74aa66c78e3b493f842701d68b3293e9.jpg

I'm still waiting for a super deep 27mm injector socket to come in the post, but after that the injectors just unscrew. I tried using a 27mm impact socket, but unfortunately those two little hose fittings you can see on the injectors for the return lines hit the reinforcing walls inside the socket, and prevent it from sliding down far enough to contact the hex section and unscrew the injector body. Only a tenner for the proper socket though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/25/2021 at 8:38 PM, Nullzwei said:

The only issue i had when i started using veg oil in my 190d was the fuel delivery seals on the injection pump started leaking (o rings & copper washers) which you can get from Mercedes for about 15 quid a set. You will need a  splined socket to remove the 5 nozzles on the top of the injection pump to do this fiddly but easy job (tweezers required).

Ugh, you could have told me this when I had the intake manifold off to do the glow plugs 😝. Good info though, I'll keep that in mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Scrubworks said:

Ugh, you could have told me this when I had the intake manifold off to do the glow plugs 😝. Good info though, I'll keep that in mind.

I managed to do mine only removing the air box.

Just dug out my receipt from Mercedes Benz Newcastle and the part numbers are MA004 997 45 40 (seal o ring 70p each) and MA017 997 41 48 (sealing ring copper washer 65p each) 2015 prices ex vat.

Look forward to hearing the difference the Monark nozzles make to your 190d.

https://injectionpumps.co.uk/product/mercedes-delivery-valve-removal-splined-socket/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great work in a great thread, and a nice car. I’ve had a number of w124:s, from  200D to 400E, and I have to get another one soon, preferably an estate. 
 

Anyway, I can’t see you got an answer about the spring kit supposed to fix slow shifts between 2nd and 3rd. It’s called K1-kit, and consists of a couple of springs and plastics. The Mercedes part number is A1262704477, I think it costs around £20 and can be replaced with the transmission sump removed. It sits behind a plate on the side of the valve body. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/25/2021 at 7:55 PM, Scrubworks said:

Been away for a little while, a friend's Celica has been occupying my drive while I do some headwork with it. On the 190D front, things have been relatively quiet and harmonious. The electric rear window repair took an interesting turn. I took the motor to a local firm that repairs and rewinds "all manner of electric motors". Walked in the door, and gave the motor to the guy at reception.

"Nah, sorry mate, we don't do car stuff." 
".......ok. How come?"
"We just haven't ever got into it. Not something we do."
"Do you know anyone who does?"
"No."

It's that can-do spirit that really makes you proud of British industry. Back at home, I figured that the motor was already broken. Opening it up and having a go myself would either render it still broken, or maybe working again. It was actually pretty easy to disassemble, and upon doing so I noticed two things. Firstly, the copper commutator bars were fairly badly corroded, due to years of inactivity. A good rub with some scotch-brite and a subsequent dousing with contact cleaner brought them back nicely. Secondly, the earth wire that joins to the end of the windings had been pushed slightly too far into its connector when the motor was originally assembled, and the thin sliver of solder holding it on had broken, breaking the circuit and rendering the motor dead. I clipped it back, gave it a good dab of fresh solder, reassembled the motor, connected a battery charger, and, success!
Professional motor repair workshop - 0
Girl in her kitchen - 1

I took the time to soak the moving parts of the regulator in brake cleaner to remove the old, mostly dried out grease, and replace it with plenty of red rubber stuff. I then put the motor back on the regulator, put the regulator back in the door, and all is now well, the window works. I could show you a picture of the the window down but I think your imaginations will fill in the gaps :P

While I had the door card off, I also took the opportunity to install some of this on the back of the door skin:

IMG_20210926_193831.thumb.jpg.55edb48f36dbc1d013ea55ebd2c8fa7e.jpg

I used to work for a company, who shall remain nameless (exploitative bunch of pricks), that specialised in the customisation of Land Rover Defenders, back when the original model was still in production. Every Defender would receive acres of Dynamat Xtreme sound deadening. The stuff makes a huge difference; you could almost convince yourself you weren't driving a glorified tractor. It's not cheap at £150 per box, but as a product I believe it is second to none. I plan to install it throughout the Mercedes, mainly in the doors. and under the seats and carpets. I may also put some under the headlining, depending on how easy it is to remove. Not that the Mercedes is noisy, but the quieter and more relaxed I can make it, the better.

One of my original goals with this car was to run vegetable oil as its main fuel. Since the car spent most of last year being sat undriven, I wanted to run a couple of tanks of diesel through it to clear its throat. However, due to all the cretins in my town buying up all the diesel a few weeks ago, I decided to bring the veg oil timetable forward. The car had covered almost 200 trouble-free miles and spent half a tank of diesel. I popped to Costco, and bought 20 litres of soy bean oil.

IMG_20211125_133327.thumb.jpg.f52cbe4822e1eaab06b1b48f442d6ccd.jpg

With that in the tank, I was then running a 50/50 mix. The car loved it. No change in performance or cold-starting, only a slight odour of chips from the exhaust. I ran that down to about a quarter of a tank, and then refilled with more soy bean, so I'm now running almost a full veg oil tank now. Half of that tank has now been used. The only adverse effect is that cold-starting when the temperature drops low during the night is a bit lumpy, but this is remedied by giving the glow plugs two cycles. I'll have to monitor this as winter draws in. Thinning it out with some kerosene is always an option. Once running though, the car is absolutely normal, though the chip smell is more intense, and is actually great for keeping tailgaters away. Also, because I'm very cool, I've set up a spreadsheet that automatically calculates how much I've saved on buying veg oil instead of diesel. Even just on 60 litres, I've saved over £20, and that's at the ridiculous price that veg oil is currently going for. It's usually available for well under a quid a litre.

A less pressing issue with the Merc I can now deal with is the windscreen. It is the original one, but unfortunately has become very scratched all through the wiper arc, due to the now-cured electrical issue that caused the wiper to turn on whenever you indicated left. This issue must have persisted for years, and all the dry-wiping has scratched the screen. I've tried my best to clean and polish the screen, and add a layer of liquid wax, which has helped, but I fear without niche specialist attention, the screen is ultimately ruined. There's also a nice chip in it which is just begging to turn into a crack at some point.

During the day it's not a problem, but at night the glare from oncoming headlights is pretty bad, so I dropped into my Merc dealer to see if they could get me a new screen. I have a friend with a W126 S-Class, and he gets all his bits direct from Mercedes, so I know they're good about legacy parts support, but the issue is often cost. I was afraid I'd flummoxed the poor guy at the parts desk, but after about 20 minutes he came back and said,
"Sorry that took a while, the data card was all in German."
"Really? Don't they translate it for you?"
"Well the trouble is, for most models more than 25 years old or so we just have scanned-in documents that we got faxed over from Stuttgart years ago."
"That sounds fun."
Turned out that there were no W201 windscreens anywhere in the European supply chain, not even in Germany, but if I handed over £320, Gunther and Klaus over in Stuttgart would drag the mould out of storage, and cast a brand new screen, just for me, and send it over. Honestly I was gobsmacked; £320 for Merc to make one screen to order is ridiculously cheap in my book. That was about a month and a half ago, and the screen got here last week. I borrowed SKCat's Volvo 940 and collected it from the dealership yesterday.

IMG_20211123_115916.thumb.jpg.e650c73f44ce8aa5dbaf98c38ef26374.jpg

The windscreen chap is going to pop round tomorrow. Hopefully he won't have to struggle too hard with it.

 


A most enjoyable thread and, until I got to the windscreen bit, was wondering if you'd considered checking with the main dealer for some of the parts you are after. The springs being the most obvious one. I have found main dealers normally quite reasonable and if you smile nicely and are polite you can normally get a 10% discount for 'older models'. The main reason I use them for quite a few bits is I know I am getting the correct part. The way I go about it is to get a copy of the WIS/EPC manual from ebay. You can use your chassis number to get the correct part number and then go an internet hunt or call the dealer.  For parts like clips, filters, certain oils, road springs (I had to replace all four on a W202 I had) and other parts I know that have to be just right it is the dealer all the way. For things like brake pads, discs, calipers I normally root about for (proper) O.E.M such as ATE. I am fairly sure the WIS/EPC covers your 190. I owned a 1988 300SL a few years ago replacing lots of odd, fiddley bits and know I used the dealer for most so will have gone armed with the correct part number.

Good luck with it by the way. I note that there are lots of 'ULEZ ophans' kicking about on Facebook Marketplace at present including a good few 190s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, The_Equalizer said:


A most enjoyable thread and, until I got to the windscreen bit, was wondering if you'd considered checking with the main dealer for some of the parts you are after. The springs being the most obvious one. I have found main dealers normally quite reasonable and if you smile nicely and are polite you can normally get a 10% discount for 'older models'. The main reason I use them for quite a few bits is I know I am getting the correct part. The way I go about it is to get a copy of the WIS/EPC manual from ebay. You can use your chassis number to get the correct part number and then go an internet hunt or call the dealer.  For parts like clips, filters, certain oils, road springs (I had to replace all four on a W202 I had) and other parts I know that have to be just right it is the dealer all the way. For things like brake pads, discs, calipers I normally root about for (proper) O.E.M such as ATE. I am fairly sure the WIS/EPC covers your 190. I owned a 1988 300SL a few years ago replacing lots of odd, fiddley bits and know I used the dealer for most so will have gone armed with the correct part number.

Good luck with it by the way. I note that there are lots of 'ULEZ ophans' kicking about on Facebook Marketplace at present including a good few 190s.

I use 7zap.com for Mercedes parts numbers and handy exploded diagrams.

https://mercedes.7zap.com/en/eu/fg/car/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/25/2021 at 8:25 PM, Scrubworks said:

found a website written by a guy who's been rebuilding diesel pumps for 40 years or so. He actually lists the available pump types on most cars, and grades their suitability for use with veg oil.

Have you got a link for that?  Despite knowing that the OM606 I run will do just as well as your OM602 on SVO, it would be interesting to have a read-up on that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...