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Dollywobbler's Consolidated Tat Thread


dollywobbler

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2 hours ago, Andyrew said:

Any updates on any other members of the fleet wobbles?

 

Not a lot to report. Matiz and 2CV are sharing daily duty, GSA still pissing hydraulic fluid, Charade still pissing coolant, Fox hads't had an MOT since before Christmas and is pissing oil everywhere, Invacar doing about eight miles per week and Oltcit now has working steering but still some way from an MOT. 

I've put my back out so no more tinkering until that's better.

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34 minutes ago, dollywobbler said:

Not a lot to report. Matiz and 2CV are sharing daily duty, GSA still pissing hydraulic fluid, Charade still pissing coolant, Fox hads't had an MOT since before Christmas and is pissing oil everywhere, Invacar doing about eight miles per week and Oltcit now has working steering but still some way from an MOT. 

I've put my back out so no more tinkering until that's better.

Sounds like a bit of a piss up then. I like a a good piss up.

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1 hour ago, dollywobbler said:

Not a lot to report. Matiz and 2CV are sharing daily duty, GSA still pissing hydraulic fluid, Charade still pissing coolant, Fox hads't had an MOT since before Christmas and is pissing oil everywhere, Invacar doing about eight miles per week and Oltcit now has working steering but still some way from an MOT. 

I've put my back out so no more tinkering until that's better.

Sorry to hear about your back dolly, I hope you're feeling better soon 

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13 hours ago, Talbot said:

But, if that limit is unrelistcally reduced due to the condition of the road, is that still the driver's issue?  There's an expectation of at least *some* grip available from the road surface, and if that is sufficiently low, it's fair to say the road surface is not fit for purpose.

Not when you come off a motorcycle due to diesel on a bend, that's entirely the riders fault in the view of the insurers, the rider should have been aware and anticipated that it might occur, should you happen to damage the road itself or street furniture at the same time it's also your fault.

The road obviously didn't offer an unexpected change in grip levels similar to driving onto sheet ice or every other vehicle would have experienced the same slide therefore either tyre issues or driver error plain and simple.

As WTC said just bloody lucky there was nothing living in that space where it ended up.

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9 hours ago, DodgeRover said:

Not when you come off a motorcycle due to diesel on a bend, that's entirely the riders fault in the view of the insurers, the rider should have been aware and anticipated that it might occur, should you happen to damage the road itself or street furniture at the same time it's also your fault.

So you're expected to drive/ride everywhere as if the entire road network is soaked in diesel fuel and offers next-to-no grip?  That's unrealistic at best.

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11 hours ago, dollywobbler said:

Not a lot to report. Matiz and 2CV are sharing daily duty, GSA still pissing hydraulic fluid, Charade still pissing coolant, Fox hads't had an MOT since before Christmas and is pissing oil everywhere, Invacar doing about eight miles per week and Oltcit now has working steering but still some way from an MOT. 

I've put my back out so no more tinkering until that's better.

Sounds like the fleet are having a pissing contest. 
 

Hope your back recovers soon! 

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29 minutes ago, dollywobbler said:

Moving on, it seems some chunks of AU have made it to Lincolnshire! Hopefully that means I get her back this weekend...

That's really good service! I have been waiting for some parts for over a week and they have only been sent from Sussex! 

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So you're expected to drive/ride everywhere as if the entire road network is soaked in diesel fuel and offers next-to-no grip?  That's unrealistic at best.
It's the truth though. I've had a fair few moments on the bike where you've went from perfectly good tarmac to "Jesus I'm on ice!" With absolutely no warning whatsoever so you learn to expect the unexpected - crap surface, spilt diesel, loose chippings. All things in a car might give you a subtle twitch but can stick a biker in hospital.

A local lad hit a railway sleeper that fell off a lorry on a dual carriageway here at the start of summer. He's not long out of hospital and his bike was written off. Had he been in the car? Yes the car might be a wreck but he wouldn't

If you have local knowledge you can mitigate - for example there is a roundabout near me that's notorious for diesel spills. I have a once lovely pair of spendy RST boots that are scuffed to buggery as a result of almost having a massive off. I lost the front end and just managed to stay upright using my boots as additional contact points. Not intentionally either, my feet were off the pegs and dragging the road as a result of being in the middle of an accident.

It's more noticeable on a bike given how much more direct feel you are experiencing from the tyres compared to a car.

On a bike the biggest factor in having an off or not (beyond how you are riding) is 110% tyres. Especially in wet weather. Bikes do expect a bit more from a tyre than a car granted.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

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The parts have now landed at RatDat HQ. He's also getting some decent tyres fitted for me today, so it looks like I will soon be reunited with my Aussie steed, thanks to some amazing friends in Aus and Lincolnshire. It was about 24 hours from having a moment, to my pal in Victoria yanking a halfshaft out of a scrapper. Small world sometimes.

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2 minutes ago, dollywobbler said:

The parts have now landed at RatDat HQ. He's also getting some decent tyres fitted for me today, so it looks like I will soon be reunited with my Aussie steed, thanks to some amazing friends in Aus and Lincolnshire. It was about 24 hours from having a moment, to my pal in Victoria yanking a halfshaft out of a scrapper. Small world sometimes.

That’s absolutely incredible really. The bits are definitely not coming on the Everard Green!

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The parts have now landed at RatDat HQ. He's also getting some decent tyres fitted for me today, so it looks like I will soon be reunited with my Aussie steed, thanks to some amazing friends in Aus and Lincolnshire. It was about 24 hours from having a moment, to my pal in Victoria yanking a halfshaft out of a scrapper. Small world sometimes.
Mental, it can take a week for me to get bits posted from 100 miles down the road

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk

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4 hours ago, dollywobbler said:

Moving on, it seems some chunks of AU have made it to Lincolnshire! Hopefully that means I get her back this weekend...

 

1 hour ago, dollywobbler said:

The parts have now landed at RatDat HQ. He's also getting some decent tyres fitted for me today, so it looks like I will soon be reunited with my Aussie steed, thanks to some amazing friends in Aus and Lincolnshire. It was about 24 hours from having a moment, to my pal in Victoria yanking a halfshaft out of a scrapper. Small world sometimes.

Woo! glad to hear the parts have already arrived, that was seriously fast shipping from down under!

I hope the fitting of the new parts goes smoothly and you can be reunited with Betty ASAP :) 

I am very much looking forward to seeing more content on/with her :) 

I wonder if she will be ready in time to make it to the up coming social still?

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19 hours ago, Dick Longbridge said:

True that. 

Cars are steadily becoming faster, yet more safe for the occupants. Irrelevant when you're overtaking on a blind bend at 90 and take out the poor fella on a bike coming the other way though. I honestly think we need to use hard-hitting video and stories to educate younger drivers. I saw *that* 1980s electrical safety warning video on twitter the other day. You know, the one where a lad climbs over a fence and ends up getting nuked. All the comments, including my own, were to the effect of 'still an unpleasant watch, even though I've not seen it in 30 years'. 

Who says only the under-35s drive like twats?

Former colleague (now retired) was driving in his usual hooligan-like manner in his 4WD when he rounded a blind corner on the wrong side of the road and crashed into an elderly couple coming the other way in their car.

The couple died and due to his circumstances the cunt escaped prison. I'll not say any more as it'll make me angry just thinking about it again and these days the mood swings are fucking *huge*. (One for my MH assessment this afternoon.)

However... at the risk of sounding even more of an old fart than I actually am, I wonder how many of "da yoof" see life - and videos like the one in the quoted post - just like a video game? Plus there'd be some bleeding heart saying such things would traumatise the little dears...

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2 hours ago, They_all_do_that_sir said:

It's the truth though. I've had a fair few moments on the bike where you've went from perfectly good tarmac to "Jesus I'm on ice!" With absolutely no warning whatsoever so you learn to expect the unexpected - crap surface, spilt diesel, loose chippings. All things in a car might give you a subtle twitch but can stick a biker in hospital.

Yes, absolutely this ^ - learnt the hard way in my case. Loose chippings on a country road (the preferred way of maintaining them round here) put a friend of my late wife and myself in a ditch on our side, narrowly avoiding a tree TF. That totalled my Renault 18, my first "modern". Got sued by her for that too.

Devil's spunk - sorry, diesel - on a wet roundabout? Been there too. Nearly sent me rolling down an embankment and if the trees hadn't stopped me, the lorries on the dual carriageway below would have been the end. It's obviously been enough of a problem that the elevated slip road now has Armco along it.

It's worth remembering the foreword that was in one edition of the Highway Code:

"Very few accidents are truly accidental."

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8 hours ago, R1152 said:

It's worth remembering the foreword that was in one edition of the Highway Code:

"Very few accidents are truly accidental."

The standard arse-covering applies here- most bends are signposted with a recommended speed. I can take the one up from here at about 25 in the wet (limit is 35) in the Pontiac. It's signposted 15.

The house the road faces before the road turns has been crashed into 41 times now. Once so badly they had to pull the remains of the house down and rebuild the whole thing.

 

Any modestly exciting road is maybe 30, 35 mph here that would definitely be nsl in the UK. 

However, if you are to be prepared for every eventuality nobody would drive anywhere. There's always a risk of something happening.

 

However, like I said- glad that the soft squishy bits are unscathed and the new solid bits are about to be fitted. Those are easier to fix.

Phil

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14 hours ago, Zelandeth said:

Wasn't there one which basically was "We couldn't make it cheaper, we couldn't make it faster, couldn't make it bigger...so we painted it." As well?  Or is my memory making that up?

that was the dolly

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Finally made it home in the Fairmont after a week and a bit from the first attempt. Folk were amazed to see it at the HubNut Social, and so was I to be honest! Seeing it drive in, after repairs by RatDat, was amazing. 

IMG_20210814_164702.thumb.jpg.63c2d8873c03d1875afe5eb8b44fb077.jpg

We wafted for an hour back to our AirBNB yesterday evening and it was just delicious. Continentals leave it feeling a fair bit more secure, not that I was in any mind to push things. I've not 100% got my confidence back in this car yet.

Today it was over 200 miles back home and that was also lovely. It just cruises so well. But, the rear brakes are still sometimes a bit sticky, even with new pads. RatDat reported that the sliders and pistons seemed ok, but that the pistons pushed out all on their own when pushed back in. No residual pressure in the hydraulics it seems. Will investigate next week. They don't get so hot you can't touch the wheel, but they do get hot enough to make it painful to touch the disc hub.

 

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3 minutes ago, dollywobbler said:

Finally made it home in the Fairmont after a week and a bit from the first attempt. Folk were amazed to see it at the HubNut Social, and so was I to be honest! Seeing it drive in, after repairs by RatDat, was amazing. 

IMG_20210814_164702.thumb.jpg.63c2d8873c03d1875afe5eb8b44fb077.jpg

We wafted for an hour back to our AirBNB yesterday evening and it was just delicious. Continentals leave it feeling a fair bit more secure, not that I was in any mind to push things. I've not 100% got my confidence back in this car yet.

Today it was over 200 miles back home and that was also lovely. It just cruises so well. But, the rear brakes are still sometimes a bit sticky, even with new pads. RatDat reported that the sliders and pistons seemed ok, but that the pistons pushed out all on their own when pushed back in. No residual pressure in the hydraulics it seems. Will investigate next week. They don't get so hot you can't touch the wheel, but they do get hot enough to make it painful to touch the disc hub.

 

Well I for one am delighted to see her back.

It takes time to get the confidence back. I mostly have now quite a few months on from my crash this year.

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