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Alex66

Hard stand for cars

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We want well need to put a hard stand on our garden, parking here is a nightmare. So what is a good way to get it done that wont turn to crap in a couple of years? Does anyone round Cleveland (Saltburn) wayk now of any reliable providers of such services also.

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I dug up the grass and put down a breathable membrain and got 3 x ton bags of stones. 

My only 2 regrets.  The stones need to be sharper. Don't go for the smooth ones, as they move more. 

And i wouldn't bother with the membrane.  It makes it impossible to weed.  

£100 max. 

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Depends what the ground is like. 

I took up an area of grass and laid the membrane and gravelled it.

The ground gets quite wet and you drive on it you sink a bit and the mud comes up through the stones. 

Membranes need a good overlap and pegging down, if they tear or get pulled up then it's a right mess. 

I also find I'm buying extra gravel every few years as it just disappears. 

 

I wish I'd put some type2 or hardcore or something down first and gone over it with a whacker. 

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Stick some reinforcing grid down to spread the load and stop the gravel moving around. You won’t need as much gravel either.

This stuff or similar:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GROUND-REINFORCEMENT-GRIDS-GRAVEL-GRASS-PLASTIC-ECO-PAVING-DRIVE-PATH-CAR-PARK/333378964228

Definitely put membrane down first or you’ll have a horrid 50:50 gravel/soil mix by next year.

Alternatively cover with soil and throw grass seed on it. 

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I’m planning to stick a membrane followed by some hardcore/sub base down on my grassy triangle to increase parking at mine this week. I wanted to go with some of those grids and put nice gravel down, but they’re quite expensive (although those ones @Skizzer had linked to are cheaper than the ones I’d found)

Need to go and measure it once Dennis has passed... 

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Teram sheet is what i used then type 1 at £9.50 per ton and a ton doesn't go far believe me, ive put 30 odd ton of crusher run and 34 ton of type one down and still need more then gravel on top.

For a concrete pad you will need to dig down to good firm ground the fill up with type 1 wacked down then a good 4 inches of concrete on top, ready mix has just gone up and is now £110 +vat per cube. Prices are scottish borders area so yours could be more or less costly.

Measure area and it's not hard to work out the cost.

 

That reminds me I just update my garage build thread. 

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If you are jacking up on it or working on the car I’d say six inch of hardcore base, then a six inch concrete poured into shuttering with some rebar grid. Get the concrete pumped in, bit more expensive but you only get one bad back...

Wait till it’s got some stiffness then run a yard broom across to give it some traction in the ice then run float trowel round perimeter. 

Job done. 

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Fook sake 6 inch and rebar he's not parking trucks you know, my mates haulage yard is that specification by the architect and passed by structural engineers.

Instead of rebar just go for the concrete with fibres in as that's in place of rebar.

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4 hours ago, Alex66 said:

I should have said we are thinking more on the line of a concrete type stand but properly done, aiming for enough for 4 cars and eventually a garage on there.

Done that with help from a builder friend. Mines about 26ft x 13ft,  Compton garage on it about a foot smaller all round.

Lot of digging, a few skips, lot of hardcore, lot of crusher, wire mesh, lot of concrete, barrowed it, but as said pump is better.

Get a few quotes and ask them  if they have done any local. 

It won't be cheap, and there are many who cut corners.

When you get to the garage, stage be aware that Compton roofs are guaranteed for 10 years, and last 11.

 

 

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Concrete slab seems like the way to go, not that hard to do and it can be extended in the future. I would highly recommend getting the concrete pumped to where you want it because a barrow full of wet concrete is bloody heavy. Don't skimp on the foundations or the slab will crack.

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If you don’t know what you’re doing then avoid a concrete slab. You (EDIT: you may) have to get planning permission, set the slab to falls, reinforce them, finish them properly, day joints, etc. If you’re asking the question then the answer is do something simpler:

 

Dig up up your grass to minimum 4 inches depth in the area required. Lay some geotextile membrane down in the area. Get many tonnes of Type 1 delivered to site (a tipper truck is easier than bulk bags) or crusher run is a good cheaper alternative. Hire a plate compactor and whack the type 1 at least 4 if not six times. Fill in any depressions and top up the area till it is level with the surroundings and whack again. Get a good few tonnes of pea shingle or similar delivered to site and a few bags of sharp sand & cement, sprinkle a little mixed sand/cement over the area and then a good layer of pea shingles. Whack once manually and wait for some light (not torrential) rain. 

 

You will need minimum 6 feet hard surface between the gravel and the pavement/road. Council slabs are the ticket here. Set these to fall back towards your gravel at approx 1 in 40.

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I second getting it pumped. I laid a garage base, I went for the overkill/waste of money option and had the base 8 inches thick! I had a crappy amazon barrow and it collapsed under the weight of the first load of concrete down the chute. A back up barrow was used and it seemed to take forever. It was a good workout and very satisfying to do however. 

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4 minutes ago, Lankytim said:

I second getting it pumped. I laid a garage base, I went for the overkill/waste of money option and had the base 8 inches thick! I had a crappy amazon barrow and it collapsed under the weight of the first load of concrete down the chute. A back up barrow was used and it seemed to take forever. It was a good workout and very satisfying to do however. 

Up here most readymix firms offer a barrow service. Much the best option. 

 

I wouldnt underestimate the skill and labour involved in getting a reasonable consolidated surface on concrete slab designed for traffic.

 

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A wacker plate for anything bigger than a pedestrian path is just torture; a vibrating roller is betterer, or a mini-roadroller for maximum opportunity for doing something daft. Unless the site is very inaccessible shirley the mixer will be able to tip straight onto your slab?

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1 hour ago, dc2100k said:

If you don’t know what you’re doing then avoid a concrete slab. You have to get planning permission,

No you don't.  You can also put a surprisingly large building on top without planning permission (depending on where sited within your plot) although you may need building regs (for the building, not the base).

Six inches hardcore & six inches concrete is overkill just for hardstanding.  Five of each (probably even four) is more than adequate (with fibres/flakes as @garbaldysays).  More may be needed depending what building you plan to put on top though.

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8 minutes ago, BeEP said:

No you don't. 

From the planning portal: 'If the surface to be covered is more than five square metres planning permission will be needed for laying traditional, impermeable driveways that do not provide for the water to run to a permeable area.'

 

This also means you cannot drain your new concrete into an existing gully without permission, and you may also need to get the approval of your local water authority if you want to drain into their network.

 

Agree with everything else you say.

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8 minutes ago, dc2100k said:

From the planning portal: 'If the surface to be covered is more than five square metres planning permission will be needed for laying traditional, impermeable driveways that do not provide for the water to run to a permeable area.'

 

Exactly.  Provided a suitable water run off is provided then no planning permission is needed.

The above also doesn't apply if a building is put on top (as it shouldn't* be getting water on it).  Although the building would need to comply with appropriate regs re drainage.

Nice edit after my reply by the way!

 

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7 minutes ago, BeEP said:

Exactly.  Provided a suitable water run off is provided then no planning permission is needed.

That's fine but when people dig up their gardens and replace with hard-standing they usually cover their entire front garden with monoblock/asphalt/concrete and set the falls away from their house which inevitably drains onto the pavement/road. This requires planning permission, and often a channel drain and interceptor at the boundary.

If you can accommodate a suitable water run-off (not a gully, but a landscaped margin probably with a french drain or soakaway beneath) then great but not always that easy.

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