Jump to content
vulgalour

1987 Citroen BX - SOLD!

Recommended Posts

I'm very envious tbh! I spent an afternoon with the autoshite beige bx cleaning the interior (where is that now?) and it was a lovely place to sit,

 

Sadly all beyond my competence and time limits,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oooh this thread is going to be good/fun :)

 

I look forward to said fettling :)

 

im pretty sure a family friend used to own a Citroen BX, after 2 Citroen DSs. those 3 cars (plus a 1982 Volvo mum had until 2001ish) where the only classic/old cars I ever rode in for any length of time until my first visit to  Zels place :) (I remember the Yellow headlights and adjustable suspension fascinating me at the time, I also used to think his Citroen DSs could float on water...)

 

Nice to see some SOX street lights still hanging in on there, those look like Geared Philips MA60 180W SOX street lights, one of the biggest daddies of SOX street lights, a Geared MA60 is on my collection bucket list :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first day you actually get stuck into a car is one full of excitement and trepidation.  What am I going to find?  Let's have a dig and see.  First job was to work out just how I was going to get the car on the lift since most of the points I want to put the jack are also points the lift wants to go and I need to jack the car up a bit to get it high enough to get on the lift pads.  I did figure it out eventually and gingerly raised the car into the air knowing just how flimsy the underside of a BX can be.  The sill rails seemed the safest bet so that's what I went with since I couldn't get the pads under anything else.

201901-17.jpg.531f60c28974c2d55819dced7105acbe.jpg

 

 

There was still plenty of mud and grass underneath from the landscaping the car had done for Dean's access road.  A quick scrub with a soft wire brush got rid of it all and while there's a few spots that underseal needs redoing I couldn't really find what had stopped us getting off the truck.  The exhaust was slightly misaligned so I'm going to go with Dollywobbler's suggestion when we were loading that it was the centre exhaust pipe clamp which looked pretty new with long-ish bolt legs.  One thing I did notice straight away was a plug hanging down near the pipes at the back of the front subframe.  It was easy to see where it came from so I wondered if this might just be the easiest fix in the world for the STOP light Dean had mentioned had stopped working.

201901-18.jpg.452eb93165c52a467c5aa0ec96143e33.jpg

Clean it up plug it in and...

201901-19.jpg.622ff111c007ed6d9e516bd364a4f51b.jpg

 

Who said fixing hydropneumatic cars was difficult?  I'm sure doing the front-to-back pipes will be a breeze now, right?  RIGHT?  Er... yeah.  I spent some time trying to figure out where the leak actually was and where the pipes went.  I could identify the two pipes that had already been replaced and the two pipes that hadn't, one of which looks more scabrous than the other.  The leak itself is hidden from view somewhere above the rear passenger sphere, which lends credence to Dean's assertion that it's the front-to-back pipe over the subframe that's popped, as if there was ever any doubt of course.

201901-20.jpg.797cac4367136319c57a54ee3b7d1f78.jpg

 

201901-21.jpg.bdd4bb42fbb97ff6a5abfc72a287f9fa.jpg

 

Then I got a bit stuck.  I couldn't trace the route of the pipes because I couldn't see exactly where they went around that bit without removing the subframe.  To help, I removed the back half of the exhaust, which was simply a case of undoing one clamp and unhooking a few rubber hangers.  This allowed me to see better where the new pipes had been put so I could do a better job of tracing.  It looks like one pipe I need to remove goes into the height corrector unit (the round thing to the right), and the other looks to go into the multi-pipe block to the right on the subframe crossmember.  I got the union in the height corrector unscrewed but the pipe itself won't come out of the corrector unit. The pipe feels fragile too, in that way rusty steel pipes do, so I'm concerned that if I put too much force in I'll snap the pipe off and give myself too much work.  Help would be appreciate on how to proceed here, I don't want to fluff it up.

201901-22.jpg.1b15623361c387f0e569c117e32de290.jpg

 

201901-25.jpg.2106c71a2a9271004cc96a38ce18aa4e.jpg

 

I traced the lines to the front of the car, and it looks like the both end at the vertical valve/union block to the right in the second image below.  I couldn't see where else they might go and the manual didn't provide much help on removal and routing of pipes.

201901-23.jpg.259a0ba8594a79f3487efde4465e7c69.jpg

 

201901-24.jpg.2a71ff57f1069dd574a4d5c54fdb5617.jpg

 

I decided to put this part of the job aside and seek advice.  I don't want to remove or damage things I don't need to.  It does look like a fairly straightforward job once you've identified which pipes require replacing.  I'm splitting this update into a couple of posts, since there's a fair bit to get through, this marks the end of the first stage of the update.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I couldn't go further on the suspension side of things, I looked at what I could do.  Since this is a BX, rust is a concern and thanks to the estate I used to have, I knew where to look.  This car doesn't really have much rust to speak of and being white, any rust it does have is going to be very visible.  I knew about some spidering on a rear wing which, unfortunately, is going to involve repainting rather a large section of the wing to correct.  It doesn't seem to need any welding at least, and it is very difficult to see, so this is low priority.

201901-26.jpg.c3717a3129da4f37c6fc31fd39eb90fb.jpg

 

The other big weakness is the boot.  I put my big boy pants on and started stripping out the boot trims, knowing just how frightening this part can end up being.  Amazingly, it's incredibly good underneath everything.

201901-27.jpg.e5315adcbf307dd738df72d8b8bb1e36.jpg

 

201901-28.jpg.e56960f89e2fb9d6d2ccc5f53f130182.jpg

 

There's just two small areas that require some attention.  A small section of sealant has failed on the passenger side, and some rot has begun on the driver's side.  This is all flat panels with excellent access so shouldn't be bad to fix at all. Looking underneath the car the inner arches are remarkably clean, and the rear apron is in excellent shape.  I'll remove the bumper to do the repairs properly and get everything cleaned, painted, and protected to keep it this good once the welding is done.  This was a very pleasant surprise, I was expecting this area of the car to be much worse even though it looks so nice on the outside.

201901-29.jpg.1a1e7f2a72a1c89330f0605be9c07d4a.jpg

 

201901-30.jpg.08c4e0cc6df80a6db4349a437fb9af6e.jpg

 

201901-31.jpg.cd478ba535ddeaa4ed7b12e9e762cb1f.jpg

 

Up front I wanted to check out the only other bit of rust of note which was the inner wings.  This is another common BX weak point and worth exploring.  There was some foam-backed stuff applied to the inner wings and when I noticed it was holding on to water I decided the best thing to do was to whip it all off and deal with whatever was lurking underneath.  Absolutely no point pretending it would be okay and letting it fester since I have the luxury of time and space to sort this out.  Amazingly, it really wasn't that bad at all, just a bit ugly.  The damage that is there appears to be localised to the bit where the vertical inner arch meets the horizontal, with a little bit in the nose on the passenger side.  The driver's side nose piece seems very solid.  I also had a look at the front crossmember that was advised at MoT and that too looks like it only needs a fresh bit of underseal to replace the bit we accidentally removed and is otherwise very solid.  I will remove the front wings, lights, and bumper to rectify all of this since it's all very easy to dismantle and then make sure there's plenty of paint and protection applied to keep it good afterwards.

 

201901-32.jpg.094f974ea0213d4178a74fa071b07f58.jpg

 

201901-33.jpg.e14b3c25fe42bdfb180bf02072505113.jpg

 

201901-34.jpg.456ee75a56d69e364fd6649db4309d30.jpg

 

201901-35.jpg.b74bd26029c0aeb04183c00df0f806be.jpg

 

This was a very pleasant surprise.  The floors and sills are amazingly sound throughout, with the exception of the few spots that need a fresh bit of protection from the scraping it got loading and unloading.  There's no crusty tender bits underneath.  I knew it was a good solid car, I didn't expect it to be quite this solid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the thing that this car has suffered the most with is sun damage and it's made some of the interior parts brittle.  I'll be keeping an eye out for spares and refurbishing what I can.  In the meantime, I'm going to be very careful with what's in the car.  Unfortunately, even with the best will in the world sometimes brittle plastics will just break.  When I removed the parcel shelf to inspect the boot, a couple of rivets holding the hinge bar broke and, as I was removing the parcel shelf itself, one of the plastic hinges that holds onto it on the back seat shattered.  I also found a random bit of broken plastic that looks like it might be from one of the front seat back trims, I just haven't found the bit it matches yet.

201901-36.jpg.005d19e92fb810b98be25f752fdf7195.jpg

 

201901-37.jpg.09e10041565b6b44360bd0c5143d116b.jpg

 

201901-38.jpg.b313bf5eaba1440d54da086d8b42c65c.jpg

 

201901-39.jpg.7cc06925510808caa7e8dfff8ade7f2a.jpg

 

 

The rest of the trims came out without incident.  While all of the various switches in the BX work perfectly fine, the passenger window over ride on the driver's side could do with either a repaint or a replacement, as could the switches and part of the dash pod.

201901-40.jpg.b0fb595c27141cf00ab1638657a7d7cc.jpg

 

 

I've also got to add a bit of sealant to the rubber seal corners to get them to hold down.  In the photo it looks rusty, which is odd because it doesn't in person.  I'll use a bit of the usual polyurethane sealant and some tape to hold this down for a few hours to a day and that should sort it, the seal is very flexible still, it's just lifted in the very corners.  Dean did make me aware of this at purchase, I'm not worried about it since it's not hiding other problems.

201901-41.jpg.02cb69ac70ca90b15bf4316a5974cf35.jpg

 

 

Up front there's just generic floor mats, in the back we've got some nice Citroen branded rubber ones.  I'd like a matching front pair eventually I think.  I'd like to replace the mudflaps all round with fresh ones if I can, the front ones are missing and the driver's rear one is damaged.  I'm holding out for the right ones, and they're low priority since there's other things I'd like to spend on first.

201901-42.jpg.ac2efc0916710580d5c0c5fbd018a39d.jpg

 

 

The engine bay is probably one of the cleanest diesel engine bays I've ever seen.  There's lots of space to work around everything and see everything.  I suspect the rocker cover seal is leaking, as usual, so I'll be replacing that.  Otherwise, nothing really appears to be amiss and it's going to be fairly easy to make and keep this area spotless.

201901-43.jpg.3715191d6010ec63767d9d377bd2af37.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a few original details on the car that I really like that have survived really well.  I want as much as possible to return this car to the original specification and keep it that way, which is giving me a bit of a quandary over the badges and stickers on the boot since while not original, they are a part of the car's history and character.  They'll stay put until I make up my mind.  I really need to get a front number plate to match the rear, the font is just superb.

201901-44.jpg.f43e297ae0a59077f336b6083a270b0c.jpg

 

201901-45.jpg.20a53bac61b153e1af68316167621c3d.jpg

201901-46.jpg.664bcb792397f7741d9ece83c4ab55fe.jpg

 

 

 

 

Other than poking and prodding I wanted to achieve something today and I'm a bit too brain-fried to deal with welding.  I needed something easy, something that would make a nice big change for minimal effort and which I could do with existing products so I didn't have to go out and buy something, or wait for an order to arrive.  I know, let's sort out that rear spoiler and wiper arm!

 

201901-47.jpg.fb66837d10ada30c5c8578bf4de37337.jpg

After cleaning, priming, and masking I got it all painted with lovely fresh satin black paint.

201901-50.jpg.8f570ce227e9f6cbf4392f972ba27c2d.jpg

 

 

I might do it again, I can do better than this.  It's a marked improvement at least.  I do need to reseat the wiper arm a bit higher too, I put it back on in the wrong place.  A little victory, at any rate.

201901-49.jpg.63dbe07889a983c4c3c92de1681cda17.jpg

 

Normally I'd be pulling everything apart for a deep clean and documenting that but I don't need to and that's weird.  The wheel is clean, the stalks are clean, there's no grubby bits anywhere.  Even the wiper blades are fine.  It's like somebody before me really liked this car and looked after it.  I'm hoping to get in and get on with the welding over the next couple of days, I'll have to figure out what colour it is (I think it's Polar White from memory, but that might also be the Xantia, which is a different white) so I can use a white that matches on the repairs.  I'm sure I'll find more jobs to do once I get stuck in a bit more, and I do plan to do things like the cambelt and check the brakes, etc. as a matter of routine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The foam back stuff in the engine bay I stuck down to hide the rust spots for the last MOT. Didn't know about the home in the boot floor by the arch though, luckily an easy repair. The brake pipe will be stuck in the compensator valve due to the little rubber seal that they use. You just have to get in there and give it a good wiggle to release. If you take the rear arm out on the passenger side it makes life a little easier with regards spotting the pipe routes. Personally as your going to replace both of the still original pipes I'd cut one and then push it up behind the subframe so you can then spot which valve it goes to. Replace, then do the other.

I'm glad the stop light was an easy fix! I did say it might be that switch on the subframe, although I do wonder if that plug got removed when it was grading the entry!

I tried for ages to get some original rubber mats for the front, then when I sold the xsara van I forgot to remove the original Citroen mats out of that.

Yep someone did love the car before you lol, glad your happy with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be best to drop the subframe down on the left side.It needs to be supported on that side with a trolley jack and the mounting bolts removed from inside the boot.The ones on the other side can be loosened but not removed.Then gently lower away taking care not to strain any pipes etc.Its amazing how much easier it is to see what's going on with the gap between body and subframe opened up 6-9".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing to be aware with dropping the subframe is if the front mounting bolt sheers a replacement mount is 90 quid. The front mount is under the plastic trim under the d post trim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dean:  That hole in the boot I only noticed because I went looking for it, you couldn't really see it from outside because there wasn't really anything to see.  I'm astonished at just how clean it all is underneath really, even the subframes are in good shape with none of the usual rusty bits around the seams.  It's quite remarkable.  I reckon the plug got snagged when it was moved, everything was pretty clean apart from the shroud on the plug, I'm glad it was such an easy fix!  I'll cut the originals so I can unfeed them from the front and then I can trace them to the back easier, I hadn't thought to do that, it's not like access is difficult so I'm putting it down to brain fog.  It seems to have popped the pipe in the one place you can't see anything, right up between the floor and the arm.  Those front arches really aren't that bad either.  I could just cover them in something like you had and get through the next MoT no bother since you can't see any rust that way, but I'm as well fixing it properly while I can I reckon.  I was looking at the shapes needed for that wing section you mentioned too and I think I can just fab it up from what I've got, all of the rusty bits look like flat pieces so replacement should be easy and cheap.

 

art:  I'll drop the subframe if I need to.  I'm hoping I can get away without doing it so I can avoid straining any pipes or fittings.  Everything looks nice and easy to get to so hopefully it'll be fairly straightforward, however I go about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did the pipes fairly recently, and a few photos are on my BX thread linked below. I'll check for the parcel shelf hinge too in the stash I picked up last summer...

 

I would be inclined to just cut off the failed pipe close to the union, and use a well fitting 6-point socket on the union rather than a spanner. I've had to weld a nut on once, and found that LHM heated by a welder spurts out under a surprising pressure, and ignites to form a miniature blowtorch.

 

EDIT - just re-read that the union is undone but the pipe still stuck - yes, they can do as they are a reasonably close fit. Presumably the pipe is to be replaced, so no big issue if it fractures, surely?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just worried about breaking the pipe off and somehow damaging the bit it goes into.  It seems my fears were unfounded and I'll just get some tools on it to pop it out.  Feeling more confident about pipe fettling tomorrow from the info provided here. I'm quite pleased at how good the interior plastics are on this one, fading notwithstanding.  I'll be checking out your BX thread in a bit, I know there's useful info in there, especially since you've recently done the pipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see this! Another happy shiter.

 

I loved my silver 1600 Meteor, great looking car and like a gateway drug for old Citroens. I WILL have a CX one day.

 

Looking forward to see this one getting some loving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just an artifact of the photo, or in that night time interior shot is the Citroen logo on the steering wheel actually glowing?

 

Seems like something which wouldn't surprise me now, but back then would definitely have caused surprise.

 

Well, from anyone other than Citroen anyway. They're just oddball enough to have done something like that "because they could."

 

Always reckoned the one on this era BX was the best looking implementation of a single spoke steering wheel, it's just so perfectly proportioned and angled.

 

Let me have a dig in the garage, I reckon I might have a set of electric window switches buried in there somewhere still. If they're still in there they're yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.... I WILL have a CX one day.....

Hopefully won't be taking you the 2.5 years it took me to find mine.

 

Somewhere out there is a barn full of CXs all owned by a fella named Dan Pearcey. S1s, S2s, Berlines and Breaks, he seems to have them all. Word is that he might even sell one or two of them in future. Here are just a few of 'em gathering dust.....

 

post-23014-0-59936800-1547379317_thumb.jpeg

 

Take your pick?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got cracking on the welding today.  I've started in the boot.  Unfortunately, I couldn't remove the rear bumper because the fixings were being the usual pain and since I was concerned about breaking things, I left the bumper on and just worked from inside the car instead.  This way I got the repair work done in the time I had spare instead of spending all day fighting with the bumper.  It's not a factory style repair, I just let in a suitable patch with a 90 degree bend rather than mimicking Citroen's construction.  Sploshed some zinc rich primer on once welded (no close up, it looks like I used a pigeon) and then had just enough time to seam seal it on both sides after this photo was taken. Happily, the passenger side spot didn't need any welding as once it was cleaned back the metal was good and it just needed a bit of fresh sealant to replace the bit that had lifted.

201901-51.jpg.78d2079e3d18ffaf42fb8a62bc3322a0.jpg

 

201901-52.jpg.fe20a8953a0902e373c5ded7c5e1e5fb.jpg

 

 

I would have liked to got the boot repairs painted and all the trim back in but it was too dark and too cold in the unit to really see what I was doing so I'll leave things as they are for now and come back to it tomorrow, most likely.  I did discover the colour of the BX is Alpine White rather than Polar White and Halfords stock a reasonable match for the areas I'm working on, so I grabbed a can of that today.  I didn't have time to do more welding work, and couldn't do more painting work, so I started dismantling the worst part of the car I knew about by first pulling out the headlight and indicator pod and then unbolting the front wing.  I was please to see the wing is actually in very good shape, with just some very minor rust staining to treat and repaint to keep it this way.

201901-56.jpg.0800ff2871c157022cd8fd502cff18dd.jpg

 

 

With the wing off, I got to see a bit of rust that I wasn't aware of, but wasn't surprising, which is where a couple of skins join.  It should be a straightforward repair since access is very good, the cleaning up is likely what will take the most time on this.  The reason it's a funny shape like that is that's the line of a seam where two panels overlap.  This is a fairly common spot, as far as I'm aware.  The other side of this is a panel seam with a smear of white sealant over the top of it.

201901-54.jpg.90d1d0d479a7780674c1a909b710d9b8.jpg

 

 

In the engine bay side, I got my first proper look at the extent of the damage by peeling off the white sealant and some of the wing in one go.  These inner wings have been painted at some point, which has since shrunk and cracked.  The rust doesn't appear to have gone beyond where the sealant was applied so I shouldn't have to dismantle very much to clean this up.  It looks much worse a job than it really is since most of the pieces required are very simple shapes and access is surprisingly good for the most part.

201901-53.jpg.724af368b3c6c2dc458378326dc8b0a2.jpg

201901-55.jpg.8996278bcd9563081ae42b17e9d7b3c7.jpg

 

 

 

I expect the other side will be a similar, but less bad, story. Better to deal with this stuff now and have it done.  I'm hoping to get in tomorrow and get some progress on the front end and get the boot repair painted and all the interior back in, I don't want to have too much of the car apart at a time.

201901-57.jpg.aa19424fa1716ab508a10cb7d785d25c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By cobblers
      Train tickets booked from a train station 30 miles away to save £9 on the recommendation of the Mrs
      Mrs booked and primed ready to drop me off at said train station.




      Mobile tool kit primed and ready, missing almost every vital component due to EU regulations about leccy tape and screwdrivers on trains (I left them all at my mums house yesterday).
      If I do break down, I should have something to listen to while I work out whether I'm with the AA or RAC or none of the above.


      Not pictured: pile of cash
    • By Slowsilver
      For as long as I can remember I have been aware of a dead K-prefix Mondeo saloon languishing on the drive of a house about two streets away from here. It had obviously been sat there for many years without moving. I kept meaning to drop a note through the door enquiring about it, but as always I never got round to it.
      Until now.
      With Bob the Renault 6 currently on hold pending a possible sale after lockdown and the Maxi mothballed due to lack of places to take it to I was getting bored, so last Friday I did just that. Things moved on very rapidly from there.
      Timeline: Saturday morning.
      I received a phone call  from the owner's daughter, who informed me that her father had owned the car since it was 18 months old and cherished it for years, doing about 2 or 3 thousand miles a year in it until 2013, when it failed the MoT:
      Date tested 17 September 2013
      Fail
      Mileage 70,926 miles
      Reason(s) for failure
      Service brake: efficiency below requirements (3.7.B.7) Brakes imbalanced across an axle (3.7.B.5b) He was told by the local garage he used that it would cost about £1000 to fix even if they could get the parts, which they said was doubtful. How can inefficient and unbalanced rear brakes cost that much to fix? And can Mondeo parts be unobtainium already? Maybe I will find out in due course.
      Anyway, he decided that was more than the car was worth but, being very attached to it, he simply parked it on the drive and left it there.
      Apparently he died about 3 years ago but his wife couldn't bear to see it go, so there it stayed until now.
      Coincidentally his wife died a few weeks ago, so I hope my approach didn't seem like grave robbing. Their daughter was planning to have the car taken away for scrap, so I was intending to offer her scrap value for it and see if it could be saved. However, she was so pleased at the prospect of her dad's beloved motor being revived that, without me making an offer, she immediately offered it to me for the princely sum of zero pounds. She also agreed that quicksilver and myself could work on it where it sat until such time as we could move it. She said that she would endeavour to find the V5 and the keys.
      Timeline: Saturday afternoon.
      Checking the registration online showed it to be a 2.0i Ghia, built in Belgium in May 1993 and registered in the UK on 15th June 1993. K prefix registrations ran from August 1992 to July 1993 but the Mondeo was not launched in the UK until 22nd March 1993, so had been in production less than three months, making this a very early Mark 1. Has been on SORN since September 2013.
      Let's go and see what we have.
      It's walking distance so that counts as exercise doesn't it 😃.
      Didn't even know if it was a manual or an automatic. Turns out it's a 5-speed manual.
      Apart from flat tyres it doesn't look to bad from a distance.

      But what about the blind side next to the fence. Fortunately it had been parked far enough away to see it.

      Urgh! It's green instead of blue.

      Back of the roof has bloomed badly, but laquer doesn't appear to have peeled.
      We took a cordless tyre inflator so the first job was to attempt to pump the tyres up. We weren't very hopeful as it had been sitting here for 7 years. The two nearside tyres had 0psi in them, the offside front had about 7psi in it and the offside rear had about 12psi in it.
      They were all pumped up to a nominal 30psi and appeared to stay up.
      Timeline: Sunday afternoon.
      Let's take a bucket of soapy water round and give it a quick swill.
      Three tyres still up. Nearside rear flat again. 75% success rate. Not bad. Pumped the flat one back up again.
      Throw bucket of water over car and apply sponge and nylon brush.
      While washing it we noticed bubbles issuing from from a tiny pinhole in the bottom of the sidewall of the nearside rear tyre.
      That will be why it went flat again then. It looks like there may have been a thorn or a sharp piece of stone on the drive next to the bottom of the tyre and when it went completely flat the weight of the car pushed it through the sidewall. 

      That's looking better.
      Not much more we can do without the keys as it's all locked up.
      Timeline: Monday morning.
      Another phone call from the daughter. She is at the house and has found the V5 and one key. Also handbook and service record. Thinks there may be another key somewhere. We wander round there and do the necessary paper work. It is now offically ours!
      Timeline: Monday afternoon.
      Send off new keeper slip and SORN declaration.
      This time we have to take the Zafira full of tools in an attempt to get it moving.
      It has been left with the handbrake on and the front discs look well rusty, so I  bet the brakes have seized on.
      Takes 2 hands to lift the handbrake lever, then 2 hands to press the button and release the ratchet.
      Rock the car gently and, wonder of wonders, all four wheels appear to rotate. First hurdle overcome.
      Don't want to bore you guys but some of you might like to know our technique for attempting to revive a long-dead engine, honed at various Field of Dreams chod-tinkerings.
      Check oil and water levels. Oil  looks pretty clean so probably serviced not long before it was laid up.
      Remove spark plugs. These all look in good condition.
      Pour a spoonful of engine oil into each cylinder just to give some extra bore lubrication on initial turn over.
      Engine compartment is so cramped that can't see an easy way to try and turn the engine with a spanner, so drop a long screwdriver into one of the spark plug holes so that it rests on top the piston, engage fourth gear and attempt to push the car down the drive, which fortunately has a reasonable downward slope. Watch the screwdriver and, sure enough, we see it rising. The engine isn't seized, thank goodness we don't have another Bob on our hands.
      Because the owner's other car was parked alongside we could not get the Zafira in to jump the battery so we connected up one of the two knackered old batteries we had brought round. Didn't want to risk connecting across a totally dead battery and shorting out the other one, so left the positive terminal connected to the original battery but disconnected the earth wires from the original battery and connected the negative jump lead to the isolated leads, thus removing the original battery from the system. Doing it this way ensures that the positive connections are still kept clear of any metalwork that could cause a short and the negative connection is earthed anyway, so doesn't matter if that touches any other metal. Turned on the ignition and, lo and behold, we have assorted dashboard warning lights.
      Hit the starter. Click. We were right, this battery is knackered.
      Try the other one. Whirr, whirr, the engine spins over. Let it spin until the oil pressure light goes out.
      Clean the plugs with a wire brush (not that they appeared to need it) and replace them. Reconnect the HT leads, making sure they are in the right order. Chug, chug, chug. Engine reluctantly turns over but not fast enough to fire.
      Remember we have a the tiny but powerful Chinese jump pack in the glove box of the Zafira, so this is deployed. Chug, chug, cough, splutter, BLOODY HELL IT'S ONLY RUNNING!
      Remove jump pack and it is still running on the alternator output.
      Leave it running while we check the condition of the spare wheel. Full size alloy, not one of these horrible space-saver things. Appears to have some air in it. Pump it up and fit it to the nearside rear. Try driving it up and down the drive to test the brakes. As we expected they were not great, but worked well enough to stop it eventually. Unfortunately the handbrake would also stop the car but the ratchet would not re-engage so having freed off the brakes it now insisted on rolling down the drive. So we took a deep breath and, leaving everything behind, we set off for home.
      No collection thread as the distance involved was about 500 yards, but target achieved with no problems, except for the power-assisted steering, which apparently now isn't. Have a cup of tea then walk back round to pile all the detritus back into the Zafira and drive it home.

      Gone. Mossy piece of tarmac blinking in the sunlight for the first time in 7 years.

      In its new home. Bob is not impressed by this non-French interloper and turns his back on it.
      Let's see what we have.

      Nicely mouldy steering wheel. Oh look, footwell lights. I say, how posh, did I mention it's a Ghia.

      Illuminated vanity mirrors. Can this get any posher?

      Optional giffer pack included.

      Lots of damp and mouldy boot trim now basking in the sunshine.
      So, what is the overall assessment.
      On cursory inspection it appears to have zero rot on the bodywork or the underside.
      Haven't tried everything yet. A few of the lights don't work (hopefully just bulbs or mouldy connections). Nor do the screenwashers.
      The two main problems seem to be the non-working power steering and the ABS warning light being on. But haven't had time for in-depth investigations yet, so here's hoping an MoT can be passed eventually. No rush, it is a lockdown project after all.
      By now I am sure you are all bored to death so I will stop rambling.
      Bloody hell these threads take a long time to compile.
      Stay tuned for more developments. Or not.
       




















    • By L fallax
      I’ve been considering making a topic for progress with my Felicia for a little while, I want to reflect on what’s been done in a more organised fashion compared to flicking through photos on my phone. 
      I’ve had a keen interest on older generation Skoda for quite some time (100series-Facelift Felicia), I bought this 1999 T reg Skoda Felicia mid April. Would of loved to buy the pre-facelift model but sadly most seem to have been scrapped, however mine does come with the 1.3 OHC engine -the same used in Rapid 136’s, albeit slightly modernised and with Bosch fuel injection producing a whopping 67bhp. 

      First pic after a wash. Missing headlight trim, dinged rear OS door, NS fender is a bit bashed in as the original owner must of had a bit of a bash, the whole bumper sits a little lopsided. Hopefully can get the bodywork pulled at some point.

       
      This is my first car that I’ve bought with my own money, so naturally wanted to put in the effort to get her running smoothly with some maintenance: new oil & filter, air filter, coolant flush, wipers, bulbs, spark plugs, valve cover gasket etc.
        
      Engine bay needed multiple washes to clean up, looked a right bombsite when I bought it, some neglect was evident from past owner!
      Three and a half months later and my Felly is now road legal (due to issues with DVLA and V62), what a jolly little car to drive though! The exhaust blows like a wet fart when you press the accelerator but it’s very comical. (Obviously will fix this when I’ve the money, haha.) 

       Driving around aimlessly I’ve covered around 160 miles in a couple of days.  I decided to drain the gearbox and refreshed it with some 75W90 SS Gl4, after a few embarrasing car park CRUNCHES into reverse gear enough was enough, definitely was well overdue a change and now it’s silky smooth. 

      Blue Lagoon Metallic is the colour for anyone wondering.
      (Removed the faded Skoda badge and sprayed the 3D Favorit badge and grill black - perhaps not to everyone’s taste but it’s my car 😄)
      Next to do is fit new brake discs & yellowstuff pads which have been sat in the boot for a couple months, need to file the edge of the pads down a tad and find a way to remove the locking pin screw from the disc- I can’t seem to get them to turn using an impact screwdriver but perhaps I just need to hit harder!
      The goal is to fit a few unnecessary modifications,  just some stiffer lowering springs and alloy wheels with good tyres. Nothing too crazy. The ride is pretty good, very little body roll, the strut brace seems to work well. A very throwable and responsive supermini, town and rural road driving is an awful lot of fun. 
      If anyone has some Favorit "Skoda" mudflaps let me know as I really would like to replace the ones that are fitted!
      Updates to come.
      All welcome to share thoughts and stories alike 🙂 
       
    • By strangeangel
      I thought I'd start a thread for this as I'll probably end up asking all sorts of questions, given that this is my first 'proper' Citroën.
       
      So... the ground clearance lever won't go all the way to the highest setting (all others work), which is bad 'cos the book says I need it to do that in order to check the LHM level. It feels like something's seized, so I don't want to force it. Any ideas for a plan of attack would be much appreciated.
       
      Next up are the wheels. I now have a set of 205 pepperpots that have just gone off for powder coating & I need to get some tyres for them. The handbook says the car should have 165/70R14s on, the wheels came with 185/65R14 on. Any thoughts about what size I should get please? Cheers.
       
×
×
  • Create New...