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PhilA

1951 Pontiac Chieftain - Locks

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I have worked on a Pontiac.

Think it was this one.

http://f1stockcars.com/around-the-pits/flashback-friday-2012-brisca-f1-stockcars-through-the-ages-part-3/

 

Hmmm, not as easy as I thought, page down to racing no 41 and that's it.

Doesn't look like there was much of it left!

 

Phil

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Doesn't look too bad that. At least it should be built out of nice thick metal so be welder friendly. Doesn't look too tricky to sort anything there, the bit that looks like by the windscreen will be the fiddly one I reckon, as it will be very visible.

 

Oil in the pickup looks like it's well due a change too from the colour. Surprised to see the old Vortec engine still in there... they've definitely had their money's worth out of that power unit!

 

Had a shot of a Chevy Astro a couple of years back with the 4.6 litre version of it...thing was hilarious. Used to gargle away (stuffed exhaust) at near idle and didn't care what gear you were in. Guessing because it must have a stupidly long stroke. Really wanted to bring that van home, sadly couldn't afford to.

 

Looking forward to seeing how you get on with this. Going for a full restoration, or retaining the patina?

 

That dash is astonishingly well lit compared to a lot of cars from that sort of era over here.

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Looking at it, really it needs to come back to bare metal in a bunch of really visible places (doors, wings) so likely it'll be a full on go-over. Which, really in this case is worth it, I think. It's been painted at least twice, so I'm not demolishing any original finishes or anything.

 

Silverado has been doing really short runs and it shows. Since yesterday it's significantly happier, I think it needed to stretch its legs a little and towing that weight gave it that opportunity.

 

I think first plan of action will be to rewire, adding in a few sensible touches, like inertia cutoff for the fuel pump etc.

 

Then figuring out what is broken, what is ok and what's just been unhooked and left. Looking at it, there's a few expensive option pieces on this car. I'd like to find a bit of owner history on it, too.

 

Phil

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Splendid. A fine automobile and definitely worth spending money on. The instrument panel is remarkably easy to read for a US car, but this was just before the era when the stylists got out of control... note the two most important gauges (oil pressure and thermometer) grouped together for quick reference. A neat neat design, along with the Chieftain's head.

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Now dry, it got turned around in the garage. I lubricated the hood hinges. The hood now opens without (much of) a fight and closes down to the correct shut-line. The stops at the front aren't there so it's a bit bucktoothed.

 

post-5454-0-90338300-1535929074_thumb.jpg

 

I might have had a little go at some of the brightwork and the badge.

I haven't taken the headlight covers off yet. I think the lamps have to come out first and I didn't get that far.

 

Also, it leaks ATF in reverse. This is on the To Investigate list.

 

 

Phil

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Great looking car. If you aren't aware, check out the HAMB (Hokey Ass Message Board) https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/

 

They are focused on traditional hotrods and customs but they have a ton of knowledge on everything pre 65. As long as you don't mention rat rod or mustang II suspension or anything modern!! If you need parts or part interchange numbers they'll get you pointed in the right direction ing.

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Someone remind me what this is can't remember and the old man will take a week to reply

 

He took a pic of himself there when he worked in Idaho just over the border from iowa

 

 

 

Idaho and Iowa are two states apart.

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I suspect the output shaft bearing of being fucked and as a consequence the output shaft seal also being fucked.

Quite possible. I'll have an opportunity to put it up on the ramp at work and check see where it's coming from.

 

Phil

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Opened the door to the garage just now to check on the battery charger.

 

I was greeted by the smell of what a proper garage smells like. Old oil, grease and metal polish.

 

Battery appears to have taken something of a charge overnight, shall see if it's good enough at all to just use to move the car about.

 

Phil

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post-5454-0-06617300-1535999053_thumb.jpg

 

I think the front light reflectors need a visit from the wet-n-dry and aluminum shiny-finish spray paint.

 

post-5454-0-90883600-1535999312_thumb.jpg

 

Interestingly the front lights have 21/5 combo bulbs in. If those fixtures work that cuts down on the hassle of indicators.

The front lenses had a combination of clear bathroom sealant and old, crumbly deteriorated foam for seals. That all came off into the bin. I have some high density foam but I'm not sure it's thick enough. If not, the craft store had one more thickness of foam sheet, so that will likely work if this doesn't.

 

post-5454-0-66204400-1535999158_thumb.jpg

 

Gently heated the rear lights to remove some of the surface crazing and then went to town with 1000, 2500 paper and finally plastic polish.

 

post-5454-0-07563700-1535999213_thumb.jpg

 

Tail lights are ok, if not a little sun-faded.

 

Little by little.

 

 

Phil

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Didn't know you could reduce the crazing with a bit of heat, that's a good tip. I assume it just sort of remelts the plastic a bit?

Ideal technique for a car I can think of..

 

Phil, you need to get this out n about asap, get the miles on it:)

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Didn't know you could reduce the crazing with a bit of heat, that's a good tip. I assume it just sort of remelts the plastic a bit?

For PMMA (acrylic) gentle application of heat can get light surface crazing to appear less intensive, as it does melt the plastic back together again as you had surmised. Deep crazing not so, as you will end up melting the surface before the heat gets in deep enough. That or you'll burn the surface or cause it to go milky.

Milky overheat is just a surface issue and can be removed by application of abrasive paper and polish.

 

It worked fairly well in this case, but I'm not brave enough to try it on the chief.

 

Phil

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