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Humber Super Snipe: overhaul.

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My Dolomite used to burn oil on the overrun as well, buggered exhaust valves.

 

Never really seemed to bother it much aside from the fact that at motorway speeds it could empty the sump in about 50 miles and you'd reek of burnt oil by the time you reached your destination...

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My Dolomite used to burn oil on the overrun as well, buggered exhaust valves.

 

Never really seemed to bother it much aside from the fact that at motorway speeds it could empty the sump in about 50 miles and you'd reek of burnt oil by the time you reached your destination...

No!......More likely inlet stem seals or guides......oils gets sucked in when valve is open.

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The last Lincoln autojumble provided a few pickings. An AC petrol pump glass bowl, which I've already forgotten where I put, and this ignition coil, the only difference being the serial number has an F on the end instead of the B quoted in the book. But it's an original part and I wanted to substitute the modern replacement which I can keep for a spare.

 

post-17604-0-12058300-1551643828_thumb.jpg

 

Splendid. Let's clean it up. I thought it was a bit grubby and oily, hang on, what's this?!

 

post-17604-0-85387100-1551643842_thumb.jpg

 

BOLLARDS!

 

No wonder it was oily. Bleeding thing's holed. I already tested continuity across the primary windings, at just under 3 Ohms all is in order. I might fit it out of curiosity once the car is up and running again but this is obviously defective.

 

The fan was fully stripped. It's a robust part and silent at high engine RPM.

 

 

post-17604-0-07219600-1551643859_thumb.jpg

 

Now, this is not the thread to be concerned with economy, but I do wonder how long I can make my 80p tin of paint last. Two coats will suffice.

 

post-17604-0-57738500-1551643872_thumb.jpg

 

With hindsight I wish I'd put the same preparation into the air cleaner and sprayed it. As it is you can tell its been brush painted. Ho-hum.

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Is that coil a steel casing? If so, could remove the crimps and get the lid off. Then weld that up and refill with oil?

 

Sadly its beyond repair. The casing is aluminium and they do corrode, I've just never seen one holed through before. I will try it on the car anyway, it can only go pop.

 

What a nice way to spend a weekend, painting a bloody great fan with Humbrol enamel paint using a modellers brush. That pint must have lasted well!

 

Ha, it kept me occupied for an hour or two. I bought the brush to paint the dipstick, its the softest one I have so it had to do.

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 Hi, Coils are not always filled with oil, some use bitumen.  Have a careful prod about in the hole to check.  If it's bitumen then sculpture some araldite or similar in it and flash it over with silver paint.

 

 Colin

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Hi, Coils are not always filled with oil, some use bitumen.  Have a careful prod about in the hole to check.  If it's bitumen then sculpture some araldite or similar in it and flash it over with silver paint.

 

 Colin

That's a good idea, I will give it a go. I would fit one of my glass oilcoils but they have to be mounted upright, not horizontally on the engine like this. Plus this Lucas coil will keep it looking factory standard.

 

The water pump has come back from the reconditioner, so I now have everything needed to reassemble the car. I have been cleaning the mating faces ready for the water pump.

 

post-17604-0-32478500-1552150028_thumb.jpg

 

This orange rubbery stuff I have come across before on other cars but I still don't know what it is. Perhaps it's some kind of silicone sealant.

 

All I am waiting for now is a day when I can move the MG to push the Snipe out and clean the engine and surroundings with the hose pipe. With everything removed access to the car's structure is good, so I might as well do the rustproofing now.

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Yup, orange RTV. Standard Halfords stuff.

 

Ah ok, now I understand. When I questioned what RTV stood for now it makes sense; 'room temperature vulcanizing' apparently. I've never liked using silicone sealants personally, in case they get inside the engine and block an oilway or something. I have bought two tubes of Stag Wellseal, old school jointing compound mentioned in the Workshop Manual.

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Fan-tastic!

 

post-17604-0-76062700-1552309918_thumb.jpg

 

That's had two coats, still plenty left in the little tin.

 

I have some top-notch giffer accessory here. A main beam flasher is the one thing sorely missed in these old cars. It was only in the 1960's they became commonplace on British cars.

 

post-17604-0-55293700-1552309838_thumb.jpg

 

Remember the hole in the dashboard?

 

post-17604-0-72537000-1552309865_thumb.jpg

 

It is the ideal place for the flasher switch. Later cars had a combination direction indicator and flasher switch.

 

post-17604-0-29996500-1552309884_thumb.jpg

 

A dry run proved it satisfactory. I can reach it without taking my hand off the steering wheel.

 

post-17604-0-89735700-1552309902_thumb.jpg

 

I won't be wiring it up yet, that's down on the list, I need some extra wire now in the correct gauge and colours.

 

Finally here's one for lightbulbfun, I spotted on my travels. What is it? Looks 1960's space age to me.

 

post-17604-0-29900800-1552309942_thumb.jpg

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Nice touch. I had fitted a flash/turn stalk to my Super Minx.

 

Moving here though, I so rarely flash my lights any more it's not something I miss. People don't really flash-to-pass here so I'll live with the high/low switch on the floor and have done with it.

 

Phil

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thats a 135W SOX (or maybe even ran 200W SOI originally) Wardle Aureole :)

 

its incredibly rare, if you have any location details, please let me know so I can pass them onto the relative "authorities"  :mrgreen: (my friend says he knows of this one and its its in Cragg Vale Yorkshire but I want to double check to be safe)

 

 

very nice spot (indeed its a 1960s lantern)  :)

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Yes its Cragg Vale, there are loads of them about plus countless other types, there's no uniformity. Thankfully parts of West Yorkshire haven't really changed much in decades, except what they recently did to destroy the Piece Hall in Halifax, that really boiled my blood and will never visit again. Thanks conservationists.

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The time arrived to clean up the engine block, an important job as it is easy to spot any fluid leaks on a clean engine, and of course it looks nice. I popped a core plug in, used plenty of Wellseal on the faces. Must be good stuff - you should see the health warnings on the packet!

Even after removing the spark plugs it was still a struggle to wind the car out up the slight incline. Incidentally the NGK newfangled nonsense have been shelved and replaced with good old Champions, N5 for this engine.

 

post-17604-0-12471000-1552684929_thumb.jpeg

 

I use Carplan water soluble degreaser, working it in with a stiff brush. After leaving it for a short time to cut through the grime I blasted it all away with the hosepipe. Note all exhaust ports and carburettor are well covered up.

 

post-17604-0-43630600-1552684947_thumb.jpeg

 

The water jacket had another colonic irrigation treatment through the big core plug hole. I opened the drain tap on the other side of the block. It’s as clean as I’m going to get it in there now.

 

Winding the car back into the garage on the handle became impossible when the rear wheels reached the garage threshold, so I let the starter motor finish the job, using the handy plunger switch on the solenoid. Makes you realise just how powerful they are.

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thats a 135W SOX (or maybe even ran 200W SOI originally) Wardle Aureole :)

 

its incredibly rare, if you have any location details, please let me know so I can pass them onto the relative "authorities" :mrgreen: (my friend says he knows of this one and its its in Cragg Vale Yorkshire but I want to double check to be safe)

 

 

very nice spot (indeed its a 1960s lantern) :)

Holy hell that's a rare old beast these days!

 

There were still a fair number of open bowl AC Ford Mercury lanterns over by Winslow when I was last out there a few years ago... really should have a nosey again some time and see if they're still about. Imagine they'll have succumbed to the unstoppable LED march by now...

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I think AC Ford are somehow still limping production along

 

they are the last manufactures classic British streetlights :)

 

http://www.acforddudley.co.uk/

 

one of these days ill place an order with them, about 10 years ago I did give em a call, its about £100-150 for an AC730 for those wondering

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I have been busy, exhaust manifold replaced, chassis and inner wing painted where I cleaned all the grime off the brake fluid damaged area, and divers other jobs my addled brain cannot recall.

 

Today has been one of those appalling days where everything was hard to do. I replaced the radiator and the bitch fought me every inch of the way. The space is really limited, and the radiator frame is just out of alignment with the stud holes, probably from when it was rebuilt. The bottom hose is a pita to fit and you have to manipulate the whole rad which weighs a ton, whilst bent double. A terrible procedure, without doubt the worst task on this car. Son of a bitch drew blood.

 

post-17604-0-04427600-1552849195_thumb.jpg

 

I was about to take the sledgehammer to it until I realised an old screwdriver would work better, just so I could spring the frame enough to get the bolt started in its thread.

 

Most of what I have been doing people will never realise or appreciate. No garage would pay so much attention to detail. Cleaning up screw threads, carefully cleaning and oiling parts, including the original hose clips, fitting wire hose clips for authenticity. Much of which comes under the header of what Cold War Motors calls shitwork, for good reason. It's a time consuming, labour intensive task. But technically correct, in the way those concours saddos can only dream about.

 

post-17604-0-25299200-1552849237_thumb.jpg

 

I rounded off the day by fitting the new brake servo. Unfortunately some cretin binned all the original parts, so I just bent the copper pipes to fit. I also need to source some 1/2" AF nuts, I scratted around the place for some bolts but the nuts I need to find. It would have been so easier had the originals been retained.

 

post-17604-0-03960300-1552849208_thumb.jpgpost-17604-0-83152200-1552849222_thumb.jpg

 

Enough for today, I need beer.

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