Jump to content
N Dentressangle

1992 Range Rover - broken!!! Anyone got a gearbox?

Recommended Posts

The bloke who helps with our garden has a thing about Range Rovers, the 'classic' kind. He'd wanted one for years, and eventually, 4 years ago, paid too much for one. It came with the usual complement of non-working electrical goodies, general scruffiness and an acquired taste colour, especially with the beautifulcolour coded alloys.

 

I have laughed at this heap for the past 4 years. I've got two other Series LR's, plus an '84 Mini, and the idea of BL producing anything of greater complexity than a wheelbarrow made me feel ill. I tried to explain to my wife why the Range Rover was such a heap: she needed to imagine the build quality and attention to detail of her Mini, scaled up to something trying hard to be a luxury car. She nodded sagely, and agreed that buying one would be a really shit idea, and could only lead to much frustration and expenditure.

 

Then, last December, the bloke announced to me that he was sick of the Range Rover ending up in the garage every month with a FTP. Which it did, pretty much. I don't know why, but I asked him how much he wanted for it. I wasn't even drunk.

 

So, through that weird process where a car you've only sniggered at becomes something you're thinking you might actually want, I looked at what I was thinking of buying:

 

zrsObsm.jpg

 

Hmmm. Looks OK so far, no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^^^

 

This is what I seemed to base all my car purchases on a number of years ago until I got bitten on an E34 estate, it was sitting on a drive for a reason, it was a peice of shit.

 

Still it got* me to Brighton and back.

 

 

* With one spectacular FTP after I touched the front bumper against a barrier in the car park. Came back out, wouldn't start, watched a load of fucking wankers laugh as I pushed it fully laden through the various levels of carpark trying to bump start it, no dice. Ended up blocking the outlet of the carpark and paying for recovery. Recovery boy predicted a fucked starter despite shorting the solenoid and it working fine, realised he was hopeless. He towed me to the other end of the pavilion and I ended up hiring a car for the night, went back the next day using my mother's AA card with the Mrs pretending to be my mother, my mother panicked and ended up driving from Swansea to Brighton to "meet" the AA man so as not to defraud !!! AA boy turned up and he suggested checking fuses etc, I mentioned I'd done this first and only found a cruise control fuse blown, we replaced it and it started straightaway, fucks sake. He then decided it was imperative he checked all the lights (??????) to which he found the brake lights intermittent. He then traced it to a switch and insisted he replace this with a 10 mile round trip to Hove. Swapped out and I was on my way, however now at 4pm on a Friday afternoon rather than the 12o clock start I'd wanted, fuck sake again. Got caught in M25 traffic by Heathrow and it overheated, took half hour to cool. Said to the Mrs "well it's bloody boiling today, it's no surprise" to which she replied "well nobody else's car had overheated". Them took another 4 hrs of bullshit traffic signs saying there were accidents ahead to get home. It rewarded me with the tailgate strut coming adrift and the tailgate dropping onto my head.

 

Ended up scrapping it with 3 months MOT as I hated it so much compared to my Scooby which did everything better, even economy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Range Rovers......rear crossmember...boot floor...sills inner and outer..inner flitches...door hinges drop..tailgate rot..headlining droop..abysmal headlights....

 

thats all I can remember off the top of my head...

 

Do Love a Classic shape Rangey though!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Range Rovers......rear crossmember...boot floor...sills inner and outer..inner flitches...door hinges drop..tailgate rot..headlining droop..abysmal headlights....

 

thats all I can remember off the top of my head...

 

Do Love a Classic shape Rangey though!!!

 

You're way ahead of me!

 

Yes, it's a Vogue SE in Aegean Blue, but not on air and never was as far as I can tell. No traces on the car and not a mention in the handbook. It's an August '92 car, I think.

 

More later....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a lovely looking thing. I wonder if it has the boge leveller if it was factory springs?

 

Mine (a few threads on here) was on springs but missing the leveller as it was originally air.

 

Now almost certainly defunct

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe those of us here over 40 will have a similar trajectory of views of the Range Rover as me:

 

Growing up: car for posh people, as in 'what's the difference between a hedgehog and a Range Rover?'

20s-30s: moneypit heap, driven by wide boys, the kind of car drug dealers get murdered in

40+: Quite fancy one, actually

 

What once seemed an over-complex load of thirsty trouble now starts to look basic enough for DIY, and practical enough as an everyday car as long the mileage isn't too great. Having a Series 3 as an everyday car, mpg in the teens wasn't that scary, and getting places without feeling like I'd been beaten up and shouted at as well as robbed seemed quite attractive. One of three ain't bad...

 

The other side looked OK too:

 

nZ6CWXD.jpg

 

Interior and footwells didn't seem too bad. No evidence of badger baiting anywhere, and someone seemed to have repaired the previous grot reasonably well:

 

iafqhDh.jpg

 

 

 

 

9VRWZnU.jpg

 

 

n4lBuK6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My old man had one of these B197KRR in what must have been the mid 90's. He drove it for 20 miles home with the brakes on fire and threw a few buckets of water over it, then sold it cheap. He was never good with cars, still isn't. His tool kit for every job comprised of a big lump hammer and some blunt chisels. I saw it a few years later in a car park in daily use but it looks like it died back in 2003. I remember it forever getting punctures on the near side and something about a tyre place finding a 2cv inner tube in the wheel. Fondest memory was sitting on the tail gate at Brands Hatch watching the racing and a joke from my uncle to my old man pointing out 'his rusty nuts' on the wheels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it sitting at the right height?

It seems low, that’s why I thought it was on air.

When I had mine the original ride height springs were unobtainable (well I couldn’t find any) - so there are probably quite a few running around on higher springs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Softdash were the Air ones...Late L reg onwards, fitted with the Discovery 2 dash (before the disco 2 was released) 

My last RR was a 300Tdi softdash on a M plate.. lovely motor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, next bit before I actually started fixing anything.

 

The rear arches, incredibly, seemed to be still there and mostly made of metal, and not painted in black Hammerite:

 

8uAgWBp.jpg

 

VsWsIfr.jpg

 

There was a little unpleasantness beginning under the boot carpet, but nothing which couldn't be sorted quite easily:

 

qCQeFOb.jpg

 

The engine looked as if it had been at the bottom of the sea, but ran really well, no smoke, rattles or taps:

 

yixjqo5.jpg

 

The price started out as £2500. However, the guy who replaced the heater matrix after its impression of a fountain and FTP on the M5 had clearly not been bought enough Airfix stuff as a kid. When I actually got near this thing in May, it was clear the dashboard had been ripped out and replaced with the finesse of a randy gorilla. Much cracked and broken brown plastic was seen. Some stuff no longer worked. The price came down to £1500, and I thought worst case I could probably break it for that, so I trotted round the corner to my gardening guy's house one morning and picked it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of wanted this car as an ongoing project. I've just finished a full rebuild of a '63 IIA, and didn't fancy another full restoration, more a sort of mild 'getting things to work again' kind of thing. It's got 14 previous owners or so, and the guy I bought it off is no mechanic - it went to his favourite railway arch garage whenever it FTP'd, but no more. So, there are loads of jobs which after 26 years need sorting out.

 

The PO reckoned the car uses water. Probably about a pint every 3 months. I've read about all the dire possibilities for this engine - OMGHGF, slipped liners, porous blocks etc - but thought there were probably a few obvious suspects to nail first. The heater matrix had probably been weeping merrily for a while before it was replaced by the silverback, but the hoses round the front of the engine and the radiator itself looked to be a bit crusty, and I noticed a seep from the bottom of the rad when it got hot.

 

So, new rad ordered from Aceparts, and the HBOL reckons cowl and fan out first so here we go!

 

The cowl was held on in typical BL fashion with 3 self-tappers, all rusted in and fashioned from finest Warwickshire Blue. Pliers and chisel were deployed until they all shuffled off this mortal coil and the cowl was free:

 

tBlxgP4.jpg

 

Next was the fan. Some on the net reckoned this was a standard RH thread on the 34mm ish nut, but the HBOL swore blind it was a LH, and so it was. Must be a proof reading error. With the cowl and big viscous spinny thing out of the way, the state of the rad was a bit clearer:

 

OePnSQb.jpg

 

IHlHGLe.jpg

 

It looks worse in real life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you need any help or tips just ask. I've more or less sorted the whole vehicle with some really neat work and some epic bodges that the MOT guys marveled at. My dash had also been removed with the care of a demolition  crew and the wiring was just a mess. Mostly good now and I use mine as a daily.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Fumbler
      To mark the genesis of my fleet project thread I here present my new car: a 1997 Nissan Micra Shape-


      It really looks that good. There is a reason for this: its previous owner was an old lady who loved the thing so much so she made every effort to keep it in good shape. It originally came from Fleet in the GU postcode which suggests to me it was bought by the present dealer at auction, hence arriving down here in Kent. Before seeing the car I checked its MOT history and its only fails were thanks to broken stoplights, which shows me that it was very well cared for. I suppose an example of this was that on the last MOT, an advisory was a corroded rear silencer. The silencer on the car when I saw it was new. Methinks the lady wanted to keep it as good as possible. It was kept in a garage and so all the bumpers and black trim are very black and the tyres are in very good condition. Spare never used! Also included a free Dettol first aid kit from 1997.
      This car has 15000 genuine miles on the clock. We clocked over 15000 during the test drive! The lady owner really only trundled around her village in it and the MOT shows that it only did some meagre miles between tests. This, of course, came at a price. We saw a cherry red Micra from 2002 at the same dealer. Paint was shoddy and when they washed it the boot had massive sections of bare metal and it wasn't very happy. This car, however, is in fabulous condition and there was no contest between the two cars- it really is that good, inside and out. Immaculate interior, driver's airbag, cassette player... all there and all functioning (apart from cassette thanks to new battery and failed display). This meant that I bought it for £1600, £100 over what was my uppermost limit, but I knew I wouldn't see another like this that was in as good shape for a fair while. It was priced very ambitiously, at £1990, so I'm content in the fact I managed to slash a few hundred off the price. There wasn't that much paperwork though. All the dealership received was the logbook with 3 service stamps from 1998, 1999 and 2000, the radio key pass, a National Trust sticker, and the original paperwork holder. I suspect the old lady died and had her car auctioned, and the massive file of paperwork is now someone's egg carton, along will everything else she owned.

      As always, this car isn't exactly in showroom condition. While the inside is great and the floor is solid, and the underseal is in great shape, the not undersealed parts need a small looking at. Mainly the rear of the driver's side sill. It's really the only bubbling on the car. I suspect a well aimed stonechip managed to fester over the wintery salted roads, making it rust even more. It's around the size of a 5p piece, and will give me the opportunity to spray the insides of the sill with some chain oil to prevent any further corrosion. Behind the fuel tank there are a few rusty joints- places where the spraygun cannot get paint onto- which some Vactan and Dynax should put to rights. Alternator belt looks original because of the cracking and Nissan badges and will need doing soon as well as the front plate. As much as I like the 90's font and original dealer surround, the dishevelled R and general water ingress is a persistant MOT advisory. It could be the MOT station being strict (and most likely is considering there's a Saxo down the road with far worse blackening), however for the sake of peace of mind and all that, I'll get a new one made. The rear has already been replaced indicating this has happened before.
      All in all, I think this is a nice plucky motor. I'll have it by the end of the week; just got to sort out tax, insurance, and it's going to have an MOT. As part of the deal it's getting the MOT and an oil and filter change which will be something ticked off the list. It has some love scratches and chips here and there, but it drives well, is stiff and controllable, and should make out to be a nice summer project!
    • By PhilA
      Well, here we go again. I bit the bullet and bought me this.
       

       

       
      It's still up at the lot right now, there will be a miniature Collection Thread embedded in this thread when I go fetch it. Hopefully if the weather's good, that'll be this weekend.
       
      So, what is it?
       
      As the title suggests, it's a 1951 Pontiac Chieftain.
      It's got a flat-head straight eight hiding in the engine bay, 4.4 litres of it. It's bolted to a 4-speed Hydra-Matic Drive gearbox. No torque converter on this one, just a fluid coupling. 116 horses at a screaming 3700 RPM, 240lb/ft at 2000. It idles at 375 RPM. Redline just shy of 4k.
      Did I mention it's quite big? Sixteen foot eight from end to end and it seats six people in comfort. Every door has a quarter-light, too. Comfort is provided by properly sized tyres and (quite surprisingly for the age of it) double independent wishbone front suspension. Steering is via worm/wheel steering box so is moderately direct and the brakes are hydraulic drums all round. Modern and scientific!
       
      It's an honest example; looks to have had a "restoration" about 15-20 years back and the rust is coming through the seams and filler. The bottoms of the door skins have gone, the bottom of the A-pillars have gone (the front doors, on a single hinge a piece still open and close with one finger!) And it's got a couple holes and blebs in all the places you would expect.
      Not much electrical works. It needs to be completely rewired because someone has "converted" it to 12V. Thankfully it was originally negative ground so that's a good start. Gauges and such can be driven from a 6V bucking converter.
      Engine has had some work done on it- starts and runs nicely with very little greb coming out of the exhaust. It's got a few gaskets that need replacing and the tappets need some major adjustment, the gearbox engages gears correctly, the steering is okay but has a lot of slack in the center and the brakes work well, dont sink or feel spongy but need adjustment.
       
      More to come. I'll post up more pictures when I get it home.
       
       
      --Phil
    • By Zelandeth
      Well I've been meaning to sign up here in forever, but kept forgetting. Thanks to someone over on another forum I frequent poking me about it recently the subject was forced back into my very brief attention span for long enough to get me to act on the instruction.

      I figure that my little varied fleet might bring you lot some amusement...

      So...we've got:

      1993 Lada Riva 1.5E Estate (now fuel injected, as I reckon the later cars should have been from the factory...).
      1989 Saab 900i Automatic.
      1987 Skoda 120LX 21st Anniversary Special Edition.
      1985 Sinclair C5.
      2009 Peugeot 107 Verve.

      Now getting the photos together has taken me far longer than I'd expected...so you're gonna get a couple of photos of each car for now, and I'll come back with some more information tomorrow when I've got a bit more time...

      Firstly...The Lada. Before anyone asks - in response to the single question I get asked about this car: No, it is not for sale. Took me 13 years and my father's inheritance to find the thing.



      Yes, it's got the usual rusty wings...Hoping that will be resolved in the next couple of months.







      Next, a proper old Saab. One of the very last 8 valve cars apparently, and all the better for it. I've driven two 16v autos and they were horrible - the auto box works sooooo much better with the torque curve of the 8 valve engine. Just wish it had an overdrive for motorway cruising...






      Next up a *real* Skoda...back when they put the engine where it belongs, right out the back. In the best possible colour of course...eye-searingly bright orange.





      Seat covers have been added since that photo was taken as it suffers from the usual rotting seat cloth problem that affects virtually all Estelles.

      Then we have possibly the world's scruffiest Sinclair C5...



      Realised when looking for this that I really need to get some more photos of the thing...I use it often enough after all! We have a dog who's half husky, so this is a really good way of getting him some exercise.

      Finally - again, I really need to take more photos of - we have the little Pug 107.



      Included for the sake of variety even if it's a bit mainstream! First (and probably to be the only) new car I've bought, and has been a cracking little motor and has asked for very little in return for putting up with nearly three years of Oxford-Milton Keynes commuter traffic, before finally escaping that fate when my housemate moved to a new job. Now it doesn't do many miles and is my default car for "when I've managed to break everything else."

      I'll fill in some more details tomorrow - I warn you though that I do tend to ramble...














    • By TripleRich
      Hi all, new to the forum.  Thought you might be interested in what I've got myself into
      I'd been after my first classic car for a while.  If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested.  Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things.  Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap.  The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it.
      So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it.

      It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again.
      Pros
      It's right up my street.  Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm.
      It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim.
      It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock).
      It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over.
      It was cheap.
      Cons
      Most of the front end has been cut off.
      Most of the body structure is quite rotten.
      It's going to take me ages.
      I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there.  So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it.  I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days.
      Cheers 
×
×
  • Create New...