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Matt

'Inbetweener' Cars / Imminant future shite/classics

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Is it fair to malign my toyotally invisible/minicabber 'no one remembers them' as Worthless >>> when skip(..sorry, container loads) have winged their way across the world to resurrect time-expired examples in far-flung climes ?

 

I don't think I have/had ever seen one.....

 

 

TS

*BTCC notwithstanding ;)

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Said it before and I'll say it again.

 

Ford SportKa. Standard Ka with the anglia engine is fun, strap a bigger engine in, bung sport in the name and paint it Blue and good examples will be worth a few bob in not so many years. I'm currently on the look out for a sound one to stash away.

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Mk1 focus will be there soon - they are being scrapped at an alarmingly fast rate for minor shit.

 

Good cars but completely unloved

 

Sent from my F3211 using Tapatalk

I broke an X plater last year, wanted a patch on sills and a radiator. But really though you cannot save them all, you have to look at the bigger picture.

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I think the classic car thing will gradually peter out because attitudes to cars are, and have been changing for some time now.  (we spend enough time bemoaning the fact on these hallowed pages)

 

People buy cars they have some kind of emotional attachment to - because they used to own one or it was their first car or their Dad had one growing up.  I think its less likely people in the future are going to be saying "I really fancy getting another VW Polo like the one I had on PCP for 36 months in 2014"

This.

 

Nobody cares any more. Very few people polish their cars, never mind even wash their own. I form a bond with my heaps over time im wierd like that. Empathy these days is disappearing fast in all aspects of life so nobody will care. The only cars that will have a following will be certain sports models but average stuff will be thrown away and forgotten

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Safrane,never a big seller in the UK and no-one really cares about them,but there are several people ,including this site,who really like them and think they are reliable old barges that are worthless,which they are,but try finding one and even more rare is seeing one on the road,i,ve had mine 11 years now and of course look for any other examples,but they are so rare now they are down to very few in Phase 1 form,parts can be a nightmare and most people have never heard of a SAFRANE........Ii think there are a few people lurking looking for the right spec and condition,but most are hard to sell or get raffled on here!

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I think the classic car thing will gradually peter out because attitudes to cars are, and have been changing for some time now. (we spend enough time bemoaning the fact on these hallowed pages)

 

People buy cars they have some kind of emotional attachment to - because they used to own one or it was their first car or their Dad had one growing up. I think its less likely people in the future are going to be saying "I really fancy getting another VW Polo like the one I had on PCP for 36 months in 2014"

I disagree. My Dads 2 Cortinas were both Company cars and getting a Marina on tick was a thing back in the day too.

 

I do agree that owning a car now is less of an event that it was even back when I passed my test in the 1990s. Trying to weld up a MK3 Escort in the vain hope of getting yourself on the road is less exciting than getting a brand new Audi A1 or a Polo but on the other hand my mates didnt half drive around in some utter piles of shit. Like a Sierra with a front bumper whose mounts were so rotten that on one occasion the bumper was ejected forwards like a granny's dentures when the car stopped suddenly at a junction. LOL.

 

Its all about a subconscious calling of the past though, no matter what your motoring experience was.

 

Ill second Rover 75s as well, theyll be very sought after in 10 years time as they are a sort of swansong of the British Motor Industry

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Yes but nobody loves the cars they have now. They say they do but then upgrade as soon as they can afford it.

 

The memories and nostalgia come from the tinkering.

 

Remember the days when you used to see Cortina with the wrong coloured doors? Or Escort L models that the owners had gone drown to the scrapyard in at the weekend and converted to Ghia spec then the next week added a large sticker in the back window that said 'Escort'

 

Nobody even changes their own flat tyres.

 

We used to mess with cars partly out of necessity but also out of fun. For £50 one weekend i made my Capri 1.6 into a 2.0. Nobody does stuff like that anymore. Sure you can buy a chip to upgrade modern stuff but that's hardly character building or likely to induce nostalgia

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I was going to make a few suggestions for the Mk1 Focus, Vectra B (especially the pre-facelift ones), Omega and a few other vehicles, but then the obvious answer hit me.

 

After having looked at Wilson x2's latest thread, it has left me very worried as I realised I actually quite like the Zafira A. I haven't seen one in decent condition for quite a while, and have to say it is nice to see one that looks like someone cared about it, and dare I say it, I would willingly own one.

 

I was also shocked as the same thing happened when I saw a very tidy Mk1 Ford Galaxy at the weekend.

 

It has got me thinking late 90s MPVs have been dropping like flies. The last Chrysler Voyager I saw belonged to BFG off here (and that was a few months ago), I haven't seen a Nissan Serena for fucking ages and I can't even remember the last time I saw a Toyota Previa. Although these are not particularly desirable in any way, I reckon they may carry some nostalgia and gain a following in about 10 years when those who used to be transported around in them start to look for cars from their youth.

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Yes but nobody loves the cars they have now. They say they do but then upgrade as soon as they can afford it.

The memories and nostalgia come from the tinkering.

Remember the days when you used to see Cortina with the wrong coloured doors? Or Escort L models that the owners had gone drown to the scrapyard in at the weekend and converted to Ghia spec then the next week added a large sticker in the back window that said 'Escort'

Nobody even changes their own flat tyres.

We used to mess with cars partly out of necessity but also out of fun. For £50 one weekend i made my Capri 1.6 into a 2.0. Nobody does stuff like that anymore. Sure you can buy a chip to upgrade modern stuff but that's hardly character building or likely to induce nostalgia

+1

I agree, it’s sad but true and also down to numberplate snobbery and the ease at which people can get a new car on a PCP. No pride in ownership these days.

 

Squirrel2

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I'd say the Picasso is in with a top chance of becoming even a proper future classic.  Please don't all kill me at once for saying that, I don't make the rules!  Especially a well-equipped one in THAT green.  Get one with a colour-matched ragtop for extra desirability points.

post-5335-0-59246100-1518488432_thumb.jpg

 

Another Citroen that should make it but probably won't is the Xsara.  I reckon I see more ZXs than I do Xsaras.

post-5335-0-48127700-1518488457_thumb.jpg

 

The last of the proper greenblood Citroens are now all climbing out of the depreciation hole with BXs being regarded as a proper classic and a design icon by some, which is satisfying and surprising in equal measure.  The Xantia is starting to hold its value for really nice examples too, so it can only be a matter of time for turn of the century conventionally sprung Citroens really.

 

Daewoo is the one brand that perhaps won't ever make it with the possible exception of the Matiz which outlasted Daewoo production and got badge engineered by Chevrolet and FSO at the very least.  Combined with cute styling that has aged surprisingly well and being available in multiple markets, it should stand a chance of being recognised and desireable in the future should any survive the ravages of rot.  They must have a soft spot as a first car for many too since they were cheap and plentiful and could tolerate a surprising amount of new driver neglect and abuse.  Silver or green ones likely to be the most desireable, I suspect.  It's basically a new-for-its-time Fiat 500 really, with all the good and bad things that entails.

post-5335-0-19728000-1518488626_thumb.jpg

 

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Yes but nobody loves the cars they have now. They say they do but then upgrade as soon as they can afford it.

 

The memories and nostalgia come from the tinkering.

I'm going to disagree with you on this. I've a friend who has all the mechanical sympathy of an orange and he was incredibly attached to his first car, a Peugeot 107 (the badge engineered Toyota/Citroen/Peugeot jobby with the glass tailgate) and was incredibly upset when it was written off when someone ran into the back of it. He replaced it with a Corsa but he still talks about that little Pug so I reckon further down the line when he's looking back on what made him happy when he's got some cash, he's just the sort to spend WAY too much getting the best Puglet he can and paying someone else to keep it tip top.

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This.

 

Nobody cares any more. Very few people polish their cars, never mind even wash their own. I form a bond with my heaps over time im wierd like that. Empathy these days is disappearing fast in all aspects of life so nobody will care. The only cars that will have a following will be certain sports models but average stuff will be thrown away and forgotten

have another +1

 

I still wash my heaps and the odd looks you get are pity from the PCP lot and a nostalgic eye from the giffers! I dont see why joe public wouldnt want to cast there eyes over their car once in a while anyway you often spot shit when washing your car..

 

I miss vauxhall wheel tims on a sierra! Or nissan trims on VW T2!

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I've definitely had a few jobs on cars that were character building.

 

Part of the problem is that cars are so cheap these days, nobody is going to spend £250 trying out a scrapyard engine in a mk1 Focus when you could probably find a better example for £500.

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The other issue is that cars built after the mid 80s (almost universal application of efi - no more points and carbs shit) are just so good in comparison to earlier stuff.

 

In the 70s, ten years old or 100000 miles was "end of life". It was either mechanically or structurally finished. Now 20 year old 200000 miles cars can still drive well and be structurally sound - and as there are more of them about, they're just old bangers, not classics.

 

I did an 800 mile trip a couple of weeks ago - I was astonished by the amount of 15 - 20 year old stuff out there just being used day to day. As cars.

 

There is also a perception that - and I detest it with a passion - "the value of these is only going up" in the eyes of everyone who now considers themselves to be a classic car expert. The other day I saw some prick's self appointed job title was "investment grade classic car consultant". Tosser.

 

In 1984 my 1973 MGBGTV8 was a recognised classic at 11 years old. Today my 29 year old 1989 E30 325i convertible is just a "nice old car". My son uses a 1989 325i as a daily driver - OK he doesn't do a lot of miles, but it is perfectly reliable and useable every day with nothing other than routine maintenance. In 1989, a 1960 Rover, for example, would need constant fettling to use every day, summer or winter.

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This.

 

Nobody cares any more. Very few people polish their cars, never mind even wash their own. I form a bond with my heaps over time im wierd like that. Empathy these days is disappearing fast in all aspects of life so nobody will care. The only cars that will have a following will be certain sports models but average stuff will be thrown away and forgotten

I’d love to wash my car (not the van, fuck the van) but I live in a flat with multi storey residents car park :(

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I think overall it is so unpredictable.

 

Some cars seem permanently slightly undervalued e.g.

 

Standard 10s, Hillman Super Minx are two examples that seem cheaper than their competitors from the time.

 

Remember there was also a functioning Austin Somerset going for a grand recently, so hardly a long term investment for the owner!

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I suppose fashion helps too - you only have to look at the anonymous VW and JDM stuff that's now worth a flipping fortune.

 

Maybe some folk out there do hanker after that Datsun 180B they owned in 1988 and would pay good money for a decent one, but I suspect many are now modded and scened beyond the point of return

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There is an element of nostalgia that bumps up certain cars, however the everyday journeyman type car hasn't really gained a lot. If you take old classic car prices on most once common cars from around 10 to 20yrs ago then stuff it through the BoE inflation calculator ( https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/monetary-policy/inflation ), you'll find most either have risen about inflation or just barely a bit more.

 

Where it rises is when stuff becomes rare and old enough to unlikely be scrap fodder. Then it gets to the point where it's worth restoring.

 

Realistically the only cars that are worth big money and have the most rises is the really special stuff or things with pedigree. Like supercars/big Jags/Astons/etc.

 

Other stuff can rise with fashion but is likely to fall because of that too. E.g. VW Camper vans, hot Fords, etc.

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Have we mentioned 205Gti's and 106 Rallyes as of yet?

 

Trouble with the latter is if I were able to buy one as an investment, I wouldn't be able to help using it as my daily until I had utterly ruined it. Still YOLO and all that eh!

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As a random example, I'm currently sitting in Tesco car park (in a 16 year old E38) waiting on my good lady who is at the dentist.

 

On my right is a 51 plate Vectra. In front is an 02 Polo and a 54 plate Clio.

 

There's loads of anonymous modern stuff too (in fact, I consider those three to be "anonymous modern stuff"), but in a random six cars, four of them are significantly more than ten years old. You wouldn't have seen that 30 years ago.

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^^^ True enough. This was the carpark outside my local Lidl last Friday night - three cars over twenty years old, in a row.

 

post-17915-0-97258100-1518517647_thumb.jpg

 

Discounting Lidl's propensity to attract giffers, I can't imagine ever seeing three pre-1978 cars in a row in a supermarket carpark back in 1998.

 

All three look capable of many miles more.

 

Full disclosure: yes, the one in the middle's mine and I deliberately parked it there, but even so - I think my point still stands.

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It's easy to forget, but "cars as a hobby" has probably only really existed since around the late 1960s.

 

Before that, a normal family might have one car as transport. Motorbikes, with or without sidecars, were still in regular use as transport. Pretty much everything was unreliable, except some of those new-fangled Japanese imports that arrived in the early 1970s - and they've got a radio as standard!

 

What does a usable old car cost nowadays? Less than a day's pay for a semi-skilled worker, in some cases. I helped a mate sell a tidy 1.25 Zetec Fiesta last year for £80... We're living in the heyday of the "old car hobby". Let's enjoy the fuck out of it.

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Mk1 focus will be there soon - they are being scrapped at an alarmingly fast rate for minor shit.

 

Good cars but completely unloved

 

Yes, I reckon early Focuses will start getting noticed before much longer, especially the never very common saloons.  An important car in the history of Ford and of course anything with a Ford badge will attract OSF tax eventually!

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Yes, I reckon early Focuses will start getting noticed before much longer, especially the never very common saloons. An important car in the history of Ford and of course anything with a Ford badge will attract OSF tax eventually!

If you wanted a cheap investment I would buy a focus ST170 and a mondeo ST220

 

If you can find a decent mk1 1.6 in that greeny blue colour they all were at the time then one of those as well

 

Sent from my F3211 using Tapatalk

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Peugeot 309 - massively massively underrated car for its era. Who cares if the 1.1/1.3's sound like a sack of typewriters? (It's called character) Better handling, roomier than many of its contemporaries (IMO) but only the GTi seems to be desirable. Find a nice 1.1GE in a fetching shade of hearing aid for the true giffer experience.

 

post-20295-0-62344600-1518519618_thumb.jpg

 

Mmm, basic.  I had a 1.3 309 years ago and it wasn't exactly quick, so I can't imagine a 1.1 being much fun.

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