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320touring's major Morris manoeuvrings


Squire_Dawson
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T-Cut is fine for that first bloom removal cut. For a finer, shinier finish some Farecla G3 is pretty good afterwards.  Having said that, if the paint is super thick get at it with some 1000-2000 grit wet and dry and water, then T-Cut, then Farecla.  It'll be the shiniest turd in the car park then.  Your arms may hate you at the end of it.

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I called up the local factor, and he was able to source and supply a new temp sensor same day.

 

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Easy to fit, but no discernible change from the gauge - more looking required..

 

Then it was onto the main event!

 

I struck whilst the iron was hot and took young split_pin up on his offer - he joined me for an evening of polishing my panels..

 

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The paint on the old girl was seriously oxidized - flatter than a witches mammary.

 

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With some compound, and some graft, we quite quickly had one side of the car coated.

 

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The compound took some time to dry, as it was about freezing in the unit - although a couple of heaters helped.

 

Once dry, the compound was buffed off by hand using some lint free cloth.

 

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You can quite clearly see that difference between the pre and post treatment in the next couple of shots..

 

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After more cutting and cleaning, the improvement was clear to see!

 

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The good news is that the paint is serviceable on most of the body (everywhere bar lowest 6 inches, and the sections under the rear side windows) look to be solid - another cut or two should have it looking superb.

 

That means the focus is on getting the bottom edges of the car tidied - something I can do over the winter..

 

Thanks again to split_pin for taking the time to come and do this - really given me the motivation to get moving on the old girl:)

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Shiny!

I know ! Was shocked, I tell ye:)

 

  

The two-tone really suits the car.

 

 

Indeed it does - was well worth the effort!

 

 

Cracking job. What compound did you use?

Thanks, it was a Maguire's compound - nothing too abrasive. Could do with another pass and a bit more work, but this shot made a helluva difference

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  • 5 months later...

We were up to the unit today, with much to be done.

 

To do said tasks, the Oxford needed to come out the way.

 

In, check it's in neutral

 

NADA

 

Apply Merc + jumpleads

 

Spinning over but not starting.

 

Remove Merc

 

Push disgraced Oxford out the way.

 

 

Got the tasks that needed doing done, then I turned my attention back to the Oxford.

 

First up, the battery off the Clio was fitted.

 

Still no firing, but at least it was turning over.

 

Time to investigate the fuel pump

 

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These SU pumps have a reputation for being a bit shonky. Ordinarily, if the car has been sitting a while, it will tick until it has drawn fuel up - this time no such noises were heard.

 

When I pulled the pipes off, it was full of fuel, and there was fuel in the first part of the line to the carb.

 

However the fuel filter was empty

 

This suggested an issue for fuel getting through the filter.

 

The fuel pump had filled the line to the filter ok, but must have shut off as seeing enough pressure in the line.

 

Running water though the filter showed it was not flowing well.

 

Time to remove it from the equation.

 

But where to start?

The pump is on the driver's inner wing, and post-17572-0-55127000-1555188169_thumb.jpg

 

Then the fuel line dives down onto the front panel

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Before re-emerging on the passenger side of the car, and going into the carb.

 

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I pulled it up and looped it round the coolant cap in the rad, then reattached it to the pump.

 

Everything reconnected, and I turned the ignition on. Pump ticked away to itself happily, and the car fired up no bother. A running well on a quick test drive round the yard, so it was time to make the fix permanent.

 

Out with the snips and cable ties.

 

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I've added fuel system overhaul to the list of things to do.

 

Thoroughly enjoyed working on the old tub, and it still drives lovely.

 

Need to get her into a driveable state and get some damn miles on here asap.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Today was a day where things escalated...

 

The initial plan was to have a good Swatch at the Oxford, one side at a time.

It was duly lined up against the wall and jacked up.

Once the wheel cam off, things started to get a little silly.

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As can be seen above, the suspension was filthy and rusty. You could hardly see the grease nipples, much less any bolts or nuts.

 

Time to start tidying

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With elements starting to appear, I got it into my head that I needed to check the condition of the suspension.

First up, the damper.

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Neither the damper or its bushings were in the first flush of youth, and the damper was filthy.

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With that stripped, it was time to remove the upper wishbone. This came off easily - 3 bolts onto the inner wing and 1 where the steering joint connects.

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It all looks solid in there - especially compared to the mess that was the back of the wheelarch.

We set about stripping the Wishbone, but not before experiencing a setback

This is what both ends of the wishbone look like -

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That is, until this happens-

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Should be saveable by welding on something we can tap.

We didn't even swear!

Caution was thrown to the wind on the other nut - I was able to run a grinder down on of the unthreaded sides and cut the bolt off without damaging anything.

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In a move that Alfa Romeo would do well to learn from, the wishbone has 2 securing bolts to the outside of the car - allowing the wishbone to be removed in 2 halfs.

The parts were all cleaned with a wire brush and bushes removed so I can source new.

All that was left was to continue with cleaning..

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then it was time to pack up and head home.

 

I have damper bottom bushes, damper and wishbone top bushes all to find, and somehow either repair or source a new wishbone.

 

Fun and games:)

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4 minutes ago, captain_70s said:

Less corrosion on that than on my Civic had. Quality motoring. 

Will be interesting to see how much improved it'll be when done considering how worn most of the components are...

That's because your Civic is made in Swindon, so a British car. Also not helped by the fact it was designed by the Japanese, so didn't have oil leaking everywhere by design to help prevent rust. ;)

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3 hours ago, captain_70s said:

Less corrosion on that than on my Civic had. Quality motoring. 

Will be interesting to see how much improved it'll be when done considering how worn most of the components are...

It was amazing how easy everything came apart (apart from the bit that didn't)

Suspect because it was caked in 60 years worth of grease. 

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3 hours ago, SiC said:

That's because your Civic is made in Swindon, so a British car. Also not helped by the fact it was designed by the Japanese, so didn't have oil leaking everywhere by design to help prevent rust. ;)

True, it doesn't leak. Why they carpeted the rear wheel wells I'd love to know though, I fail to see what that could achieve other then generating rust...

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Just now, captain_70s said:

True, it doesn't leak. Why they carpeted the rear wheel wells I'd love to know though, I fail to see what that could achieve other then generating rust...

Sound proofing I think. Most other manufacturers do it too. I know our Audi's has it but it's not very absorbent though. Fords do and it causes the Focus mk1 to rust comically around the rear arches. 

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Fun day todayIMG_20190510_111646.thumb.jpg.d52b10352d6003f8b99172a0eab55bab.jpg

Operashun "Gizza Wishbone" commenced at the crack of 11.

The quarry was located:

IMG_20190510_114223.thumb.jpg.e9f718030fe6ade862a8ccb70caf8138.jpg

Disarmed

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And Disabled:

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Like any good attack squad, we went on a wee loot hunt too.

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Not a bad wee haul!

And, for reference, an Oxford door will fit complete in the boot of an s124, with the seats up.

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13 minutes ago, mercrocker said:

Good work!    Not many donors around now and looks like you got some useful hard to find stuff there....Decent steering wheels are not easy to find either.

Cheers! Aye, we lifted everything we could - even if we fix/clean up these bits and swap them out it's a good plan

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