Jump to content
Zelandeth

Zel's Motoring Adventures...Lada, Citroen, Mercedes & AC Model 70 - 11/11 - The Sun Motortester Has Arrived...

Recommended Posts

Slide based carbs as commonly seen on two strokes are quite a different bit of kit...but it could probably be cleaned up and brought back to life so long as nothing is irreparably seized.

Probably will want a set of seals too - though given how many Villiers engines are out there I doubt those will be hard to source.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I now have a box of heater for the van.

Also have this.

IMG_20191104_195650.thumb.jpg.d000e4e3bd5924b95c1426e2c6524ae7.jpg

Honestly not sure what to do with it...though if I can get it to wake up enough to display the time... epic geeky clock for my workstation.

Not certain whether I'll be able to get that far without the driver "card" as it's ages since I last touched one of these machines.  Also lack the base plate, so will need to figure out how to get power to it via the DB-25 connector on the back...

Will have a dig through the box of heater stuff tomorrow...looks to be all there and decent enough though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't recall anyone in the trade complaining about them...Unlike what both First and Stagecoach replaced theirs with.  One went with an Almex machine, the other a later Wayfarer...but both gave rise to much ire from the drivers as I recall.

So rather than getting further distracted by obsolete bus ticket machines, let's see about getting the upgrade to the heating in the van done.

Starting point...a box of bits.

IMG_20191105_140024.thumb.jpg.6bc12c0feddf671f4aa8e818c86e265b.jpg

The teeny tiny silencer for the burner exhaust pleases me far more than it probably should.

IMG_20191105_211332.thumb.jpg.e551bc9e943db8939c2abdbaa360cc79.jpg

While I forgot to get any photos, first thing I did of course given that this was a China special was to take it apart to make sure there wasn't any corrective work needed.  Sure enough there was.  The fan was fouling on its housing to the extent that it was totally jammed.  I'm not entirely sure whether this was due to the fan getting shoved further onto the shaft if the thing has taken a knock in shipping...or if the nearby bracket had never been pushed fully home.  Either way...two minutes, a large screwdriver to act as a lever and some brute force resolved that.

The heater in the living area of the van lives in the locker under the sofa.  The old one is gas fired, but doesn't work.  The fan runs, but it never fires.  Probably just needs a good clean and service...but to be honest an oil fired one probably makes more sense given that I've got a 70 litre tank of diesel on board.  Makes it a lot easier to just turn the heat on without first having to make sure I've got gas on board, run outside to turn the reg on etc...Here's what we started with.

IMG_20191105_145751.thumb.jpg.6e4c75c852492d39777eed9be41127a8.jpg

Plus its little control box.

IMG_20191105_145758.thumb.jpg.694cae1edf81c01c8ddf5a8e35213d14.jpg

Control unit was removed first.  Helpfully everything plugs in, no hard wired nonsense to worry about.

IMG_20191105_151234.thumb.jpg.772f16578ae751f04983a3169bbd941d.jpg

Then after disconnecting the gas supply line, four screws later the heater assembly itself just lifted out.

IMG_20191105_151253.thumb.jpg.b527208377175151c4a1dd1ed0ce1771.jpg

Leaving the little concentric breather/flue screwed into the floor.

IMG_20191105_151258.thumb.jpg.7fc3ef92dd121c837128029325f6eb04.jpg

...Which was then unscrewed and removed.

IMG_20191105_151713.thumb.jpg.4b3874ea6cf2668554350f57ae8f9517.jpg

Oh...and the thermostat.

IMG_20191105_152000.thumb.jpg.2f41f1647172bf473374f888d34e9d65.jpg

Which is just held onto the wall by a couple of tiny self tappers hidden under the dial.

With all that lot now out of the way it was time to start getting ready to install the new hardware...The first real step there being to make the hole in the floor a bit bigger as the new heater has a separate intake and exhaust rather than the combined assembly on the old one.

Before getting the jigsaw out though I had a peek underneath to make sure I wasn't going to go and do something daft...you know like cut straight into the top of the fuel tank, through brake lines or anything like that.

IMG_20191105_153745.thumb.jpg.bbdc311b60dcf3ba53d4c18fe8c6e3b4.jpg

Nope...Plenty of room to play with.  Especially as I only needed a couple of inches.  Like so.

IMG_20191105_153617.thumb.jpg.8abbdb9682b1c150a9752368e1d6f8c9.jpg

IMG_20191105_155203.thumb.jpg.0c043caa5c57a4a63d56ec78436b57ea.jpg

Scruffy job to be fair, but I'm under no illusions that I won't be revisiting this job at a later date as I want to totally rearrange things in this locker as it wastes a lot of space.  Plus the wiring is just plain UGLY.  I'll probably flip the heater around 180 degrees and move it towards the wall back nearer to where the mains cabling comes through the wall.

Anyhow...for now let's get the thing in and working.

I figured that it would be way easier to get the baseplate fitted and to attached the air intake and exhaust lines before taking things outside rather than in the sea of debris strewn all over the floor in the van.

IMG_20191105_161304.thumb.jpg.c334cd5eee3c2b7c0799e77342f9649f.jpg

Dropped it in (glad to see that my measurements were right and it fit.

IMG_20191105_162745.thumb.jpg.ed26e66826d1b7149a645a81b1cac450.jpg

Getting the fuel line back up through the hole would have been far easier if I'd just done it from underneath the van...but it was tipping it down, so instead had a right faff of a time trying to get the blasted thing to co-operate.

Fuel pump added (it will probably wind up in a padded box in due course to the clicking doesn't drive everyone mad)...

IMG_20191105_164330.thumb.jpg.3b88b4daf8e1d8ded53a99b41b0271b1.jpg

Obviously the exhaust and intake lines will need to be routed and secured...but this won't stop things working for a test run.

IMG_20191105_165932.thumb.jpg.6cf55c950234179ad080452e7af71608.jpg

Oh...and electricity would be useful for a test too.  To be honest you can't really go wrong in that regards with this system.  You've got a red wire and a black wire...everything else just plugs in and the connectors are all different so you can't connect things wrong.

IMG_20191105_165624.thumb.jpg.b9fb9cdb262f538ab2eafd59b637d478.jpg

I had kind of hoped to fit the new thermostat/controller in the place of the original...however that was not to be.  The connector on the wiring won't fit past a batten just behind the panel it needs to run behind.  So just went for a spot on the face of the locker for now.

IMG_20191105_190254.thumb.jpg.6aaef3cb37e303e4e98030ffefe26e18.jpg

Went for this location so it should still be possible to reach the controls while in bed.

While it's not currently producing heat due to a lack of a fuel supply (that's one of the jobs for tomorrow), it has now been test run.

IMG_20191105_190249.thumb.jpg.e129f695e39f25b4fc4d17f19f5fd000.jpg

Couple of observations at this point:

1. The fan is virtually silent...Only real noise is actually the air it's moving.  Obviously the burner itself will make a bit of noise, but it's waaaaaay quieter than the old unit.

2. Power draw.  The documentation states that the maximum running power draw is 40W.  Yeeeeeaaahh...About that.  This may be the case once the unit is up and running, but it pulls a hell of a lot more than 40W when the glow plug is energised during starting.  Digging further through the manual reveals one tiny paragraph which mentions that the starting current may be up to 12A.  This will be getting its own dedicated feed to the leisure battery as the existing wiring gets worryingly warm during startup and shutdown!

So jobs for tomorrow...

1. Track down a reducer and a T-piece so I can plumb in the fuel supply.

2. Route the intake and exhaust pipework & attach the silencers.

3. Route a new power feed, switch and relay.  Needed because the controller on this doesn't have an actual "off" function.

Apparently by far the biggest limitation with these heaters is the controller...which by all accounts is a bit naff.  However there's a very well respected "drop in" replacement out there known as the Afterburner project I believe, which both addresses the shortcomings of the original and adds a good deal of additional functionality, so I'll be investigating that at some point. 

Hopefully tomorrow we'll actually have it working and I can start putting the interior back together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Zelandeth said:

2. Power draw.  The documentation states that the maximum running power draw is 40W.  Yeeeeeaaahh...About that.  This may be the case once the unit is up and running, but it pulls a hell of a lot more than 40W when the glow plug is energised during starting.  Digging further through the manual reveals one tiny paragraph which mentions that the starting current may be up to 12A.  This will be getting its own dedicated feed to the leisure battery as the existing wiring gets worryingly warm during startup and shutdown!

This is the same with the Eberspacher that they ripped off the design from; I wouldn't be surprised if the surge current until the glow plug heats up is as much as 20A, it certainly is with Ebbys. The other characteristic that might be shared with Ebbys is a sensitivity to supply voltage; if the cabling is weedy or too long or if the battery is tired or flat then it may not start up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today started efficiently enough, getting the new power feed directly to the leisure battery fitted.  That was easy enough, though I need to empty the locker so I can neatly clip it in down one side.

The next step however involved not a small amount of faffing about and getting not one but two mouthfuls of diesel.  The issue was that I couldn't get the damned fuel pump for the heater to prime for love nor money.

Eventually I tried with a cup of fuel propped as high up in the van as I could get it...at which point the issue became blindingly obvious.

IMG_20191106_175719.thumb.jpg.06574690e90ded8d0a761df6519a503c.jpg

Fuel was pissing out of the seam between the two parts of the casing on this fuel filter.  Well...that would indeed explain why it wouldn't prime!

With that taken out of the equation (I'll pick up a new one tomorrow) and the pump finally pumping fuel rather than air let's see if it will fire up properly.

Oh...after a brief check underneath to ensure the fuel hose isn't touching the exhaust.

IMG_20191106_175548.thumb.jpg.6211faba2ddea2cfb2d6c841bea7dcef.jpg

I'll be going back in there with some reflective foil tape to line the floor around the hole to protect it as far as possible from the heat, and the hole around the fuel line will be sealed with Sikaflex (not doing the baseplate itself yet as I do want to move it at a later date).  Not too worried about the lack of a grommit given it won't be able to move once it's sealed...and it's marine hose which is nigh on indestructible anyway.  Plus I don't have any grommits the right size.

Can't actually tell much from inside aside from when heat starts being thrown out of it...but it's quite obvious from the exhaust side when the burner fires.

Apologies for the loud buzzing towards the start... annoyingly this phone doesn't silence the notification vibration when recording video.

The smoke initially (unburned diesel actually) I think is mostly because it will have dumped quite a bit of fuel into the combustion chamber while I was trying to get the pump to prime properly.  I don't think it will probably smoke quite so much on future starts.

Yes, it does sound like you're standing next to a teeny tiny jet engine...it's quite loud actually (outside, is really quiet inside the van), and I wasn't expecting much from the supplied silencer really.

Impressive... didn't expect that to do anything...much less pretty much totally eliminate the exhaust noise.

Next steps will be to find a T-piece and reducer so I can plumb it into the vehicle fuel supply (probably a check valve too, so a failure of the heater fuel pump can't allow air to be drawn into the vehicle's supply) and to tidy up the piping under the vehicle.  Fit the intake screen/muffler and the exhaust silencer while I'm there.

Seems to chuck out a really decent amount of heat (not surprising I guess given the 5kW rating!) and run really quietly, impressed so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think it would make much difference.  The issue with these isn't so much "radiated noise" so to speak... it's more a very clear mechanical "clack" which is physically transmitted through the bodywork.  A padded enclosure where it's non-rigidly suspended is probably the best bet...or do a search on Google...these heaters seem to have quite a following so I'm sure there's an elegant and quite possibly available off the shelf solution to the issue of noise.

To be honest it doesn't seem to be too obtrusive in my case  (now it's pumping fuel rather than air anyway).

I tend to work on the assumption that keeping stuff inside is always the best policy where possible...at least you know that the elements aren't going to turn it into a block of rust in five minutes flat if it's inside the van.

Checked the current during starting earlier with my clamp meter and I was showing 13A while the glow plug is running, so well within the spec of the wiring I installed...which was stone cold thankfully unlike the original stuff in the van!

Can see quite a bit of rewiring being in my future as the performance of quite a few electrical systems is a bit marginal.  The water pump in particular likes to brownout the lighting circuit while it's running...which isn't the end of the world for a couple of tens of seconds every hour...but I don't like the idea of stuff getting warm...especially given that the wiring in this thing is buried under the plywood wall panels in polystyrene...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I'd not call it finished, the heater install is now at a stage I can leave it be for a little while.  I'm going to need the van quite a bit over the next couple of weeks, so need to cut out pulling it to pieces.

It was still distinctly wet outside...so I decided to postpone plumbing in the heater to the vehicle fuel tank until A: It's less wet...and B: There's less fuel in it...I don't want to go and accidentally start syphoning 70 litres of diesel all over the drive.

So we've gone with a temporary fuel tank for now.

IMG_20191107_173650.thumb.jpg.512a02990468c7b8b1412c45523b2668.jpg

The tube is a really snug fit in the hole I've drilled in the cap so it's not going to spill anywhere, and the can has been firmly wedged in place... it's not going anywhere.

The bracket was attached to the silencer and it was attached to the van...I need to attach a little elbow to the end so I can point it a little downwards rather than just outward as it is at the moment.  There's not a particularly strong stream of gases from it at least...there will definitely be a "Warning - Hot Exhaust" label going down there though.

IMG_20191107_173403.thumb.jpg.06d470e968055998d06745b96e026e33.jpg

I'm an idiot though and put the bolt through the bracket the wrong way...so I'll need to flip that around because it looks messy.

While I was down there I also added some heat shielding around the exhaust pipe to protect the floor around it.

IMG_20191107_175042.thumb.jpg.bf22cc0b9e4e77fdbe6074b7421b5e66.jpg

The intake hose has also been fastened in place and has had the muffler attached.  I've tucked it in behind the fuel tank so it should be pretty well shielded from the elements.

Then I was able to give the heater a proper test this evening...we were showing 9C on the thermostat when I got through the door after dinner...fifteen minutes later the van was comfortably warm.  I'll take that result.

Then I just needed to tidy up the mess I'd made...looked like a camper again pretty quickly.

IMG_20191107_211633.thumb.jpg.a5a640b576e8eb3fe64d0f5ce66ecef9.jpg

Irked I didn't get the thermostat straight...though it will be going back on the wall when I pick up the Afterburner kit anyhow...

IMG_20191107_211238.thumb.jpg.fdd8ace2fcebd5e967514994d83eb7bf.jpg

As currently there's a hole where the old stat was.

IMG_20191107_211825.thumb.jpg.fcd74524f39d5b3779303f3c1d96a8bd.jpg

So this does leave me with something I need to find a new home for, the old heater.

IMG_20191107_210717.thumb.jpg.65aa8c4c3f343f64e924502bed077c98.jpg

IMG_20191107_205821.thumb.jpg.e7e90d59f08bc56acfb1bf96694c392e.jpg

That is a funky looking heat exchanger...

Looks like something out of a nuclear reactor...

IMG_20191107_205756.thumb.jpg.4bb88c7fd635a955afcc017ab9f7b217.jpg

IMG_20191107_205740.thumb.jpg.6d826490e7a5f59346fdbd41098373f4.jpg

 

So that's where we are so far... probably will be leaving it here for the time being as I need to actually use the van over this next week or so, so need to leave off pulling it to bits any further!

 

In addition I have finally actually ordered some 3/8" UNF bolts in high tensile steel form to hopefully serve as new wheel bolts for the Invacar.  I'd rather just have changed the studs...but that's obviously going to be a long winded job...so this will hopefully get the car mobile again in the interrim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's going to be a bit of an equipment upgrade going on in my garage shortly.

A couple of years back I rescued this old Crypton Motorscope 335 from my local garage.  They had it buried on its back half under an awning.  They hadn't had the heart to bin it after many years of faithful service.  Who says mechanics aren't sentimental?

Sadly the only photo I have to hand right now is of it slightly buried in the back of my garage.

IMG_20181228_200503.thumb.jpg.1f759a676c50ba06d779285466fce739.jpg

Despite currently being buried in my garage, it's actually proven really handy on a few occasions...though practicality aside, I knew I had to rescue it the moment I spotted the huge rank of flipdot buttons.  The Panaplax digital readout above the analogue meter was an unexpected bonus.  I'm a bit of a display tech nerd and it was the first time I'd seen that technology in person.

Essentially it's a very specialised multimeter with a scope and timing strobe attached to help diagnose ignition and charging system issues.  A CO% meter was an optional accessory...sadly not fitted to my unit. 

She needs a little love as the button contacts are scratchy as hell and a little percussive maintenance is sometimes needed to wake it up...I suspect it needs a decent dose of contact cleaner and the various card edge connectors similarly cleaned.  Given I spent about half an hour reviving it and it had been half exposed to the weather for God only knows how long it's doing very well.

However, I stumbled across something which has been on my wishlist ever since I saw one a long, long time ago...

s-l400(2).jpg.6fbe2eb6b5760d4254c1ba9bce696f8e.jpg

Functionality aside...LOOK AT IT!

I'm a complete sucker for that flat smoked panel with chrome trim aesthetic...best exemplified by the Kolster Brandes KV-024 television (circa 1968) which was my gateway into proper vintage technology restoration - and the first valve based device I ever played around with.

profile(2).jpg.f807124656b83accd5b88349631521b6.jpg

Sadly that's currently in hibernation in the back of the loft as it needs a new CRT...and they're not something you exactly trip over these days.

I was expecting this to go for ridiculous money to someone with far deeper pockets than me, only to be gutted and have the faceplate wind up on the wall of some trendy office.

So what was the end result?

Screenshot_20191108_113747.thumb.jpg.14e9fcd05a562066a5898ec0f26b6e4b.jpg

Well that was a surprise!  Just the starting bid.

So a van has been booked for Monday to go and collect it.  Roughly 80 miles each way, so not even far away.

Given the fact that these things weigh about as much as a small country I decided it was worth spending the extra £15 to go for a van with a tail lift...my spine will thank me for that. 

Basically this has the same scope functionality on the left hand side as on the old Crypton unit - though what's different here is that instead of a glorified multimeter on the right, there's a CRT hooked up to a rather primitive microcomputer.  This allows you to do quite a bit more detailed analysis of the data gathered.   Including stuff like recording the current drawn by the starter motor during cranking to give a rough estimation of the relative compression ratio of each cylinder.  In addition there's a CO% and HC exhaust gas analyser built into it.  This is an optical type as well, so there's a good chance that with a proper service that it will work just fine.

Here's an example showing the display in action (from the user manual).  This is the earlier version - identical as far as I can tell aside from the cosmetic differences.

Screenshot_20191109_021650.thumb.jpg.14a95ba9fb33f2881e00e3d57bda0dd0.jpg

Rather looking forward to getting that in the garage...been a while since I've had a decent tech project.

Folks want me to video the initial inspection when I get the heavy sucker of a thing home?

 

Done a little more work on the heater install in the van.  One thing which was bothering me was that the exhaust was pointing out to the side...the gases expelled from it are HOT and I was worried that it was a hazard that someone was going to burn themselves on.  It also had a serious habit of pointing exhaust directly at my mains hook up cable.  The pipework didn't want to let me point it downwards...so I had to improvise.

Discovering that 22mm pipe was a perfect snug fit in the silencer outlet made things easier.

IMG_20191108_210051.thumb.jpg.834ff05de40d335401e78bf74db83410.jpg

Though the question springing to mind was whether the solder will melt...no idea how hot the thing runs.  Only one way to find out is to hook it back up and fire it up.

IMG_20191108_213030.thumb.jpg.c0685043421c16114423299331bb9755.jpg

Yes... it's melted the solder.  I'll just replace the elbow with a compression fitting tomorrow.  Not too worried about the pipe into the silencer as that's a very snug fit, and a quick tap with a hammer and punch should make sure it's never going anywhere.

 Still really impressed with how quickly it warms the van up...and glad to report that the comedy smoke cloud on startup has stopped being produced now the fuel pump has been properly primed.

Edited by Zelandeth
Added an image I forgot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

Folks want me to video the initial inspection when I get the heavy sucker of a thing home?

 

the fact that thats even a question!

is like asking me "Hey Dez I have a detailed pictures of a Prototype Model 70 with an 8ft bayonet cap fluorescent tube used for scale do you want those pics?"

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, look what arrived yesterday!

IMG_20191110_122400.thumb.jpg.a71501b2ab061e14cc3af7608b233e82.jpg

...And they even screw into the hubs!

IMG_20191110_122515.thumb.jpg.ed692cc5b4693e4fec583226322f782a.jpg

(That's only screwed in by a couple of threads, they're not that massively long).

So once the remaining one is drilled out we should be back in business.

In the interrim at least I can bolt the wheel back on though which will allow me to move the car.

The bolts will be screwed into the existing wheel nuts (to use the conical face on them to centre the wheel), then through the wheel and into the hub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

excuse me for not knowing

but are those bolts just so you can move her around or will it allow you to continue using her on the road as per normal?

and if so whats the downside to them over proper wheel studs, is it that the brake drum will fall off every time you need to change a wheel?

(also wondering, can you chop the head off one or well 4, wind a nut part way down on there and make your own wheel studs?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The downside is mainly that the hub will be subject to wear whenever you need to take the wheel off.  Plus I'll probably need to track down some washers to serve the purpose of the shoulder on the original studs.

I guess there's no reason I couldn't cut the head off once it's wound into the hub, using the nuts as normal, though I'd need to be really careful not to damage the threads when cutting... it's probably more trouble than it's worth.  If I find there's trouble with wear to the threads in the hub I'll probably look to drill and tap the hole to the size of a commonly available screw in studs.

Fact is that it's such a light and low powered vehicle that these bolts should be absolutely fine.  Barely any smaller than those Fiat saw as fine for the 126 the axle came from any how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Zelandeth said:

The downside is mainly that the hub will be subject to wear whenever you need to take the wheel off.  Plus I'll probably need to track down some washers to serve the purpose of the shoulder on the original studs.

I guess there's no reason I couldn't cut the head off once it's wound into the hub, using the nuts as normal, though I'd need to be really careful not to damage the threads when cutting... it's probably more trouble than it's worth.  If I find there's trouble with wear to the threads in the hub I'll probably look to drill and tap the hole to the size of a commonly available screw in studs.

Fact is that it's such a light and low powered vehicle that these bolts should be absolutely fine.  Barely any smaller than those Fiat saw as fine for the 126 the axle came from any how.

chop the head off, use the right washer for shoulder, Bam DIY set of wheel studs? no need to worry about wearing out the threads on the hub or having to tap anything :) 

seems way too simple but i cant see why it wont work, either that or im missing something obvious, (probably the latter!)

im not sure how expensive these bolts are but you could perhaps buy a few incase the threads do get buggered up when chopping the heads off the bolts or get a machine shop to do it? i imagine these might be too hard for it, but could you also clean up the threads if needed with a die? a bit like how you chase the threads out of a hole with a tap

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't really see an issue with wearing the threads in the hub out.  They were absolutely fine as far as Fiat were concerned for a mainstream production car...and you're hardly going to have the wheels off every week.  It'll be getting done by me then too, rather than some disgruntled ham fisted monkey in Kwik Fit too.

The bolts were cheap so I may well have an experiment.  Just a shame there's not enough clearance to just bolt it into the back of the hub as that would be a really nice solution.

Guess the potential downside to that is the same as with any setup with screw in studs, that it's always possible you might wind up screwing the stud out rather than the nut off it - though I'd probably try to replicate the original tack weld to keep things in place to keep the odds of that happening as low as possible.

Mostly just now I just want the thing back on the road.  I've seriously been missing driving it... especially having just seemed to have got the drive and such to start playing ball so the proper but fixing could commence.

Do have a deadline for her needing to be ready for a proper high speed reasonably long run now though.  Nothing even vaguely to compare to Dollywobbler's first few road trips with TWC, but she will be making a trip over to Birmingham on May 22nd when we head over to ConFuzzled.  While the event's nothing to do with cars, it brings in enough of a crowd (~2500 attendees I believe) that they actually have their own mini car show event as part of the weekend these days.  This would probably depend on Chris being able to borrow something large from his work for the weekend though, or (as with the run up to Scotiacon this coming weekend) I'll instead need to take the van so we have enough cargo space.  Admittedly there will only be four of us as we won't have an overseas guest in town as well so that will help...but there's still a hell of a lot of stuff that has to travel with us...and much as I love the Invacar, hauling around full size suitcases isn't her forte.  Hmm...roof or Rover P6-esque rear luggage rack?

Don't really mind which I wind up taking...they will both be enjoyed by people just for different reasons.  Just the Invacar is such an oddball it seems like the default option for sharing.

While I'm sure she could (once the wheel is reattached obviously) make the trip just fine tomorrow, I've never really been one to just shrug and say "it'll be fine!" Before commencing a long trip.  I really do prefer to have a car which I know is in reasonable health beforehand.  In the case of TPA, it takes a bit of time to build confidence in that with so long off the road.  Aside from that, I've yet to fully learn what's normal in terms of the noises, vibrations, smells and such...and obviously once I know that it helps spot any potential issues before they become major problems as they arise.

That will need to be well and truly done though before I start planning the epic round country run. 

Few things will definitely be done before that though...

[] Instrumentation upgrades.

-- Oil pressure gauge.  We've seen evidence that these engines after long disuse can drop bits of sludge when put to work hard and which can then clog the oil pickup strainer.  This isn't going to be a gauge where I worry about what the actual number is.  It will be one where I know what is the normal range hot and cold...if it wanders outside that range, I know I need to look at something.

-- Oil temperature gauge.  Probably not really necessary given the size of the oil cooler, but these cars weren't ideally designed for spending hours and hours on the motorway, and the trip will inevitably require some pretty long stretches at higher speeds...so I'd rather be able to keep an eye on it.

-- Voltmeter/ammeter.  Not least because my gauge binnacle has three holes, but it just seems a smart thing to have where the system sits off charge at idle.  Especially if you're likely to be spending time in traffic with the headlights on.

All analogue gauges of course.  If I could find period Smith's ones at a price I liked I'd go for that...but I haven't so far so the random ones I have rolling around will do.  Goodness only knows how I've not lost the senders over the years!  Say it again... I'm not someone who spends hours fretting over what exact numbers are shown...I just like to see if things are not normal for the car sooner than later.

[] Ventilation fan upgrade.  The demister is currently basically useless.  That could become really tiresome really quickly...plus switching to an electric fan could give me the option of adding forced cool air ventilation to the mix in the summer.  Also means I can actually have a heater that is actually fully off when switched off!  Means less air bled off from the cooling system too which can only be good I think.  Already have the blower, relay and switch...just needs to be installed.

[] Front end storage?  I'd really like to be able to work out a away to install some storage up front.  Doesn't need to be huge...but it would be nice to be able to fit a basic toolkit, set of jump leads and a bottle of oil in there.  If I'm going to be on the road for a couple of weeks there's going to be enough crap in the cabin as it is.  Ballast up front can't be bad anyway.

[] Fit a better twist grip.  The throttle really isn't that comfortable, reckon after an hour or so it would get really old.  Sure there are a million choices out there...happy to go for comfort over originality there.

[] Get the thing at least mostly weatherproof.  Yeah... I'm not driving probably a thousand plus miles in something that leaks worse than Caterham.  Especially as the windscreen seal drips right on my knees.

I'm actually quite looking forward to this trip...sure I will even more once I've got a few more trouble free miles covered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

Do have a deadline for her needing to be ready for a proper high speed reasonably long run now though.  Nothing even vaguely to compare to Dollywobbler's first few road trips with TWC, but she will be making a trip over to Birmingham on May 22nd

if it makes you feel better, my dead line to get REV on the road is the 1st of may for shitefest 2020 :) 

and I aint even got my licence yet let alone driven her on the open road!

(tbh not worried about the licence front, im more worried if there will be time to get REV ready in time...)

 

32 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

but these cars weren't ideally designed for spending hours and hours on the motorway, and the trip will inevitably require some pretty long stretches at higher speeds...so I'd rather be able to keep an eye on it.

I know of someone who drove a Model 70 to france  and back via motorways in the 1980s :) 

 

33 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

[] Fit a better twist grip.  The throttle really isn't that comfortable, reckon after an hour or so it would get really old.  Sure there are a million choices out there...happy to go for comfort over originality there.

 

this very much this! when ya figure something out for TPA, ill probably steal the idea for REV, as im pretty sure REVs twist grip at one point had some sort of covering, thats long since disntigrated so its surfice has a bunch of sharp ridges, that specficly make your hand very sore LOL not to mention its pretty broken mechanically

(if I can find anything ill probably just wear a glove or something)

 

36 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

Hmm...roof or Rover P6-esque rear luggage rack?

you would not be the first!

image.png

(personally dont like how he has drilled holes through the rear engine cover not to mention it covers up the engine vent)

image052.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cut a screwdriver slot in the end of your bolts, cut the head off at the desired length, then fit them using high strength studlock. If the threads are a little sloppy perhaps tap the threads at the end opposite the screwdriver slot gently with a hammer to inflict slight damage, this will stiffen things up a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After six and a bit hours in the most horrible van I've driven this decade (and I've no idea how many times I was flailing around beside for the seat for the gearlever and trying to pull off in second because the gears are in the wrong place), this has arrived.

IMG_20191111_203524.thumb.jpg.09ac85cdd1041c7c238461180c1fc972.jpg

IMG_20191111_203529.thumb.jpg.b236c950c9d6ae1117f3009b7e68a1f5.jpg

Only *nearly* killed me and my husband getting it in the door.

Will give it a quick wipe down this evening, tomorrow we will try to get some basic testing done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah...the 1215 is just a beautifully made bit of kit.

Has had a really quick wipe down...not touched the faceplate yet though.  This like the Crypton has the graticule for the scope on the outside...so I'll need to be damned careful cleaning that.

Overall the initial inspection shows it to be in pretty exceptionally good shape compared to most of them I've seen. 

If filthy.

IMG_20191111_212750.thumb.jpg.7052ac2ca247a7024e652b3ddabc2e82.jpg

Quick wipe down has helped.

IMG_20191111_214338.thumb.jpg.85dbe44efa32b5ff4cd6b204f448bd53.jpg

IMG_20191111_214553.thumb.jpg.b72f1a951767ac887fdd08390225e346.jpg

IMG_20191111_214616.thumb.jpg.cd48b9a40b1dcb516ce15b4460d1b1c5.jpg

Flipdot indicators built into the buttons for the win...

IMG_20191111_214418.thumb.jpg.3b2ac456bc05dc8eabe02bff05cf19c0.jpg

IMG_20191111_214443.thumb.jpg.85f96696379279d3de24d53f78040eaf.jpg

Will give it a proper clean tomorrow and then get some testing done.  All the attachments are here, just currently piled in the corner to make it slightly less unwieldy to move...it was heavy enough without it swatting me in the face with cables every five seconds.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think i would be inclined to set the silencer horizontal rather than vertical like it is now for clearance issues if nothing else

these heaters may smoke on start up if they didn't "run down" properly as there will be excess fule in the burner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Noel Tidybeard said:

i think i would be inclined to set the silencer horizontal rather than vertical like it is now for clearance issues if nothing else

these heaters may smoke on start up if they didn't "run down" properly as there will be excess fule in the burner

It's mainly initially been situated where it is because the manual was adamant (to the extent of saying it in capital letters) that it should be horizontal with the condensation drain hole at the bottom.  Secondly the pipework doesn't have a massive amount of flex in so the location is pretty constrained.  I may well rotate it through 90 degrees so the flat profile is horizontal (yes, ignoring the instructions) as you suggest to make the profile a bit lower.  In reality though, the van has ridiculously high ground clearance and if that's getting in the way I must be doing something wrong!  The actual vehicle exhaust and step under the door are quite a bit lower than the heater exhaust.

This is pretty much the same spot on the opposite side.

IMG_20191112_171047.thumb.jpg.27897e8aa7ff87110c8ec745f5b72703.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly I need to go out and do boring stuff like grocery shopping now...but couldn't resist a quick test just now.  Did a quick sanity check with the Megger (mainly so I didn't have to go reset the damned RCD again) and then powered it on.

IMG_20191112_142356.thumb.jpg.727ec910229f5777f0eaa3fa9038db79.jpg

Judging from the shape of the CRTs this doesn't have many hours on...

IMG_20191112_142632.thumb.jpg.f3d096fd095ac37d385f36229589c1f4.jpg

IMG_20191112_142751.thumb.jpg.8aac6819056573e309ea6c67bd79bf47.jpg

It's actually sharper than the photo makes it look.

The computer display keeps cutting out though (seems like a display rather than computer issue itself as it comes back without any disruption to the actual data displayed) so it unsurprisingly needs a bit of attention.

Hopefully will be able to get a closer look later today.  Definitely looks encouraging though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will indeed be fluorescent I'd think, sadly that doesn't appear to currently be working.

Speaking of not working...neither is the offside dipped beam headlight on the Xantia.  The lamp failed at the end of last week, went to change it today.

After just under an hour I gave up and took the van out instead.  Reckon I'm going to have to disconnect the ECUs and remove the enslosure they live in to get into the headlight.

It really should be law I think that any conventional lamps on a car *must* be changeable using no specialist tools (i.e. more than a screwdriver) or specialist knowledge at the side of the road.  The amount of cars you need to dismantle the entire nose to change a bulb on (Suzuki Cappuccino, I'm looking at you...you have to take out the wheel arch liners and front bumper off) is frankly ridiculous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this afternoon I wound up running around like a headless chicken so ended up with very little time to actually look at the 1215.

Before I locked up for the evening though I was determined to investigate at least one issue...being me of course the first item on the list was the backlight for the sign.

Looked simple enough to get into, the brightwork strip under the sign is just held in by three machine screws.  Something immediately became apparent...no wonder this thing weighs a tonne!  Was expecting a little bit of pressed tin...

IMG_20191112_212240.thumb.jpg.a6fae089f02fbd33308f2e3d6890b179.jpg

That bit of trim probably weighs a couple of kilos.  If this is the sort of build quality I have to look forward to we're not going to have many issues!  The sign itself is a *really* snug fit in the front of the machine, so I didn't attempt to move it further than I had to.

The light was utterly dead...not a flicker, nothing.  Have to wonder if this tube is original...

IMG_20191112_212414.thumb.jpg.ddf9f898280e1401ae045def0a1c4da4.jpg

Of course curiousity just got the better of me...August 1995, so no.  It's been changed at some point.

Only 3' tube I had to hand was a yellow Narva which I'd had in service at Halloween.  This was enough to prove the ballast at least.

IMG_20191112_212808.thumb.jpg.8691ce2641029a24c073ca41d8b040a0.jpg

It appears to be a pretty aggressive instant start ballast given it lit the tube when it was only half inserted.

Took me a bit of digging but did find a suitable tube in the stock.  One of the stack of NOS tubes from my old work building found by the demo crew.  That poor old building keeps on giving.

IMG_20191112_213104.thumb.jpg.b42da54a7942f989292e8b9207e52f46.jpg

Off we go.

IMG_20191112_213320.thumb.jpg.ab1b3b4b2e86249c35d6337711372366.jpg

Back together.  Looks the business.

IMG_20191112_214257.thumb.jpg.c2d2f5c5855a06180b435b3509cd133c.jpg

*Hopefully* I might actually get a chance to look at it properly tomorrow afternoon.  Would really like to at least get the back cover off before we leave for the weekend on Thursday morning.

Have to wonder how much the optional remote control cost...

IMG_20191112_214306.thumb.jpg.23fe835a92c6868580b87289878062d2.jpg

Anyone got any idea what the original purchase cost of this thing would have been?  Hoping once I open it up we'll be able to pin down the production date at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Broadsword
      I think the Broadsword fleet has become sufficiently complicated to merit a combined thread so that gradually all new additions will appear in one place.
       
      As of Sunday 17th March the situation is interesting.
       
      Two Citoren Xantias (remember the white Xantia of Excellence is for sale people!)
      http://autoshite.com/topic/34699-w-reg-citroen-xantia-20-hdi-xantia-of-excellence-%C2%A3999/
      http://autoshite.com/topic/34596-citroen-xantia-double-madness-rust/page-2
       
      A turquoise XJR6 pending overdue-collection (need that gone now!)
      http://autoshite.com/topic/34003-jaguar-xjr6-double-madness-double-sold
       
      An XJS 3.6 manual project which will get in high gear soonish. Wont be a keeper but will be fun getting it back to something presentable. Drivers fantastic!
      http://autoshite.com/topic/34664-jaguar-xjs-36-manual
       
      A Range Rover P38, which is turning out to be really rather good.
       
      And to mix things up even more I'm off on a collection caper today. Had first refusal on it and was expecting it to come around in a year, but things soon changed and no way was I going to pass up on it. It may well render the second Xantia redundant as I've got a really good feeling about this motor.
       
      In the meantime here are some snaps of the Range Rover. As usual it was a car I said I would probably never buy due to their reliability*. I have said the same of Jag XJR, XJS, XK8 and I have had all of those now. Basically the moment I declare buying a particular car is impractical or improbable, I end up buying one.
       
      Things to note on the P38. It's a nice colour with tidy body. The EAS has been removed. It runs and drives lovely and it doesn't have enough electrical problems to hinder progress. The main one is the driver's side window not working, but that should be fixable. I've tried changing the outstation, that didn't fix it. Might be wiring under the seat. Other than that I bought it and took it for an MOT the very next day, and it passed. Since then it had what seemed like a battery drain, but since unplugging the RF thingy for the remote locking and putting on a proper lead-acid battery, which the car can actually charge, unlike the modern lead-calcium batteries, it has been perfect. I will treat it to a full service soon.
       
      Stay tuned for the latest collection later today!



    • By TripleRich
      Hi all, new to the forum.  Thought you might be interested in what I've got myself into
      I'd been after my first classic car for a while.  If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested.  Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things.  Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap.  The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it.
      So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it.

      It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again.
      Pros
      It's right up my street.  Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm.
      It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim.
      It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock).
      It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over.
      It was cheap.
      Cons
      Most of the front end has been cut off.
      Most of the body structure is quite rotten.
      It's going to take me ages.
      I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there.  So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it.  I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days.
      Cheers 
    • By Shirley Knott
      Greetings all.
       
      After lurking here for a short while, frankly liking what I see and enjoying the various shite, the site has well and truly struck a chord with me. I'm a serial buyer of ropey sub £1k vehicles, don't have to but genuinely enjoy it.
       
      I feel like I might (Just might) have found my 'spiritual' home here
       
      I've been posting across the web on owner specific forums (Usually using either my JoeyEunos or RandomPrecion handles) for a while now, but from here-on-in I will pull my threads together and merge them here into one ghastly topic.
       
      My current steeds...
       
      Lupo 1.7 SDI
       
      SAM_5560 by
       
      and the work/story so far...http://forums.clublupo.co.uk/index.php?/topic/102863-joeyeunoss-sdi-beater/
       
      Golf Mk4 SDI
       
       
      SAM_5531 by
       
      and the thread.... http://uk-mkivs.net/topic/597074-project-slow/
       
      Early (1989) Mk1 Eunos (This one was recently sold)
       
      SAM_4656 by
       
      the thread...http://www.mx5nutz.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=213274
       
      Other shite I've owned and moved on in the last year include this ropey Passat...
       
      SAM_6011 by
       
      and this legendary £300 Fiesta Finesse...
       
      Festa by
       
      Cars I'd like to own/actively looking for in the forthcoming weeks/months/years...
       
      Rover 75 (Dizzler)
      Peugeot 405 (XUD)
      Mk1 Octavia (Estate/dizzler, pre pd or SDI)
      Honda CRV (Gen1)
      Volvo 240/850
×
×
  • Create New...