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Zel's Motoring Adventures...Jag, Citroen, Mercs, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5...04/08 - Interior Trim Repairs...


Zelandeth

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9 hours ago, PhilA said:

It's just the sheer intensity.

Same light fixtures on mine, same position, just made brighter had the same effect Zel mentions (OH LAWD HE BRAKIN' is reduced)

Definitely seems to be the case based on the brief trip I've done so far. 

Had the first dose of my COVID vaccine today.  Was a pretty painless experience, the centre was really organised and did everything they could to put me at ease as I *really* dislike needles.  Basically down to a bad experience when I was really young.

Didn't even feel it, though I bloody do now!  Feels like I've been punched in the bicep really hard!

Oh and my right hand that lost a fight with TPA's door yesterday is a good deal less sore today and the swelling has gone down about 80%.  It's turned a lovely colour of purple though!

IMG_20210616_225616.thumb.jpg.571af22a649c4d53f06859959623540b.jpg

Still can't quite believe that I did this closing a bloody door!

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Not been much to report.  My Covid jab left me feeling pretty well wiped out for a few days - nothing really to write home about, just absolutely dead tired.  Having hurt my hand also largely put me off doing much in the way of practical work.

Feeling more myself today though and my hand is pretty much sorted (though it still looks an interesting colour of purple), so took TPA out for a run today to get some errands run.

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Seemed to dodge the worst of the weather too, given that it rained quite heavily just before I went out and just after I got home.  Was a little breezy for her on the A5, but nothing too drastic.  Just meant made a point of keeping the speed down a bit and being ready to counter the inevitable wobble at a couple of points.

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  • Zelandeth changed the title to Zel's Motoring Adventures...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes & AC Model 70 - 21/06 - Business as Normal...
14 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

Really would be nice to get out somewhere to grab some more interesting photos one day...

164928623_IMG_20210622_1526442.thumb.jpg.38a8e3539a429a79a5c2d0d7f949759d.jpg

surprised you have not done the obligatory small car thing of parking her in one of the Trolly bays for a laugh? :mrgreen:

14 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

Though she did tick over 13K miles today.

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356 to go then that will be 2K covered in my ownership...2K has rolled round a lot quicker than the first thousand did!

Woo go TPA!, makes me very happy to hear how frequently she is used these days :) 

to the point now where when an Invacar gets posted into a facebook page or something such, often someone will say "theres a bloke in Milton Keynes who runs around in one" :) (along with someone often mentioning Brian in Sheffield) 

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On 11/06/2021 at 23:25, Zelandeth said:

The thought occurred to me that while I'm there I may as well add a reversing light as well - not because I want it to provide me with light to see by - but as an indication to other drivers that I'm reversing.  Not having one means that nobody will ever let you back out of a space in a car park and things...It's just something that it's nice to have.  For the sake of £3 of light, a switch and a bit of wiring it just makes sense.  I'm using  (and enjoying using) the car a lot more these days so little creature comforts like that are the sort of things which just make day to day life more pleasant as she's obviously not going to be leaving the fleet any time soon.  Does mean I'll need to track down another period appropriate looking switch and indicator light for the dash though. 

Seriously...Did you guys really think I was just going to tack something that ugly thing straight on the back of TPA?

use a micro/pin switch on the gear selecta like a handbrake light

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4 hours ago, Noel Tidybeard said:

use a micro/pin switch on the gear selecta like a handbrake light

Really just involves me not being lazy!  It's not really difficult to do, it just requires a bit of engineering to design a bracket really.  There's really nowhere convenient you could just slot a switch in as it stands. 

If the selector on the other side I might suggest a momentary button on the gear selector like the high/low range switch on older lorries as a starter enable button.  So it's not actually a neutral lockout, but having to have my hand on the selector is pretty good insurance that I'll check where it is.  As you need to give the engine a bit of throttle from a cold start though this abruptly results in you needing three hands, so that idea isn't going anywhere!  Haven't entirely discounted that for the reverse switch mind you as it would save me having to drill more holes in the dash...

  

6 hours ago, LightBulbFun said:

surprised you have not done the obligatory small car thing of parking her in one of the Trolly bays for a laugh? :mrgreen:

Woo go TPA!, makes me very happy to hear how frequently she is used these days :) 

to the point now where when an Invacar gets posted into a facebook page or something such, often someone will say "theres a bloke in Milton Keynes who runs around in one" :) (along with someone often mentioning Brian in Sheffield) 

I can think of much more entertaining ways to get fined £100 by the company who run Tesco's car park than that...Seriously they control it by cameras and honestly are looking for excuses to hand out tickets, so just behaving is the order of the day!

They've tried to ticket me twice now for parking the van "not fully within a marked bay" when the thing is about two metres longer than any of the marked bays in the car park...so I either through park through two end to end spaces or reverse into one of the end on spaces along the edge of the car park, sticking out in the aisle a bit.  There's one strip where I can *almost* fit in the space because there's just a grass area behind the space so I can get about 80% of the rear overhang over there.

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Nice work on the extra lamp, though symmetry has m le wondering if two wouldn't be better...

I think the later lamps are actually a bit brighter, so can't say I've noticed the same problem. In cars with no reverse lights, I tend to flash the brake lights and/or put an indicator on. 

Which reminds me. Hazard lights are an upgrade I really would like to make on TWC. You could get aftermarket hazard light switches in the 1980s. Wonder if I could find one?

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Not really practical to put two in a symmetrical location as one would want to be attached to the fan hub - unless you put them somewhere else anyway.  The fact it's offset a bit does but me but a concealed location when not in use made it a worthwhile sacrifice I thought.

Think it's somewhat down to local driving habits too - with how regularly you're braking down to a standstill from 60+ here compared to on a normal road a clear braking indication is a bit more important, as most folks seem to leave braking to the last millisecond from what I can tell.  The idea that someone might start slowing from 70 more than 50 yards before a roundabout seems to be a foreign concept.

Hazard light kits are pretty easily found for kit cars etc and as you say would be a really sensible upgrade, something else which is on my list for at some point.

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I remember retrofitting hazard lights to my Renault 16 - it was a case of buy the switch from the dealer and then alter the car's wiring to match the diagram in the Haynes manual.

I'm surprised Model 70s didn't get them later in life.

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Re: Reverse lights, how about the spring operated pull-type switches you get for motorbikes and handbrakes and such? 

Attach it in an easier location and have a cable or something pull on it when reverse is engaged, and left slack when in forwards?

At least that way you won't leave it on.

Phil

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6 hours ago, Zelandeth said:

Intrigued to see that as of the last fuel up the economy still seems to be improving tank on tank, 40.3mpg on the last one. 

Curious as to why it's still changing...not complaining though!  If we could make it to the mid 40s that would be great.

should do! I think about 45Mpg is considered the average for a Model 70 :) so im glad to hear things are improving towards that value

although it can vary from about 35Mpg to 50Mpg depending on exact driving conditions

 

BTW I noticed in your post on another forum that your planning for TPA's next major service

im curious if checking the state of the Dynastart brushes are on that list? or if you have checked TPA's brushes

I was just wondering because I dont think any of us Model 70 owners have checked on our brushes

or at least no ones posted about it

 

(@AdgeCutler's recent work on his Invacar Mk12's Siba Dynastart units made me think "shit I should really check the brushes before I find out the hard way they are worn out and burn out an armature")

 

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On 16/06/2021 at 13:42, PhilA said:

It's just the sheer intensity.

Same light fixtures on mine, same position, just made brighter had the same effect Zel mentions (OH LAWD HE BRAKIN' is reduced)

You converted yours to LEDs did you? I think I'll be taking a leaf out of your book on that. 

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6 hours ago, Crackers said:

You converted yours to LEDs did you? I think I'll be taking a leaf out of your book on that. 

I did.

Screenshot_20210627-122958_Chrome.thumb.jpg.69b6aa3f0dc2224dde00e93483a2ec70.jpg

Very impressed with these, they work well with standard reflectors  with the light pointing outwards from the vehicle. Only downside is they are taller than a regular bulb but the light throw is very even.

Screenshot_20210627-123033_Chrome.thumb.jpg.7cd5853f9fd44d270754a903f7e19f2f.jpg

These are also good but the light throw from the top kicks out in 3 distinct beams- I just scuffed the lens with sandpaper to diffuse the beams a little which helped for this application.

However, where space is at a premium these are actually shorter than a standard 21/5 bulb. The light coming out sideways is at a lower point than a regular bulb, but for things like Morris Minor lights and such that have no reflector they'd be good.

 

Intensity and color though- both very good. The amber one is actually a very good orangey-yellow like indicators should be if they're shining through clear lenses. Even if not, they bolster the lens color. Don't buy white ones for colored lenses.

 

Phil

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Never really expect anywhere near quoted efficiency figures driving around here though as it's all full throttle/stop/full throttle/stop and repeated forever.  I averaged 23mpg in my old Saab back up north which folks generally said was decent for an 8v automatic 900...Once I moved to MK that dropped to 18mpg on a good day.

The Jag really should be mid to high teens but my average is coming out at 12mpg so far... though I do know I've got a stinking vacuum leak which won't be helping anything.

The biggest problem with LED lamps for the Invacar is that most of them seem to be very directional and the lamp holders are pointed up/down...so I need something which is really designed to be a side emitter.

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Otherwise the ground and sky will get well lit but anyone following the car will be distinctly underwhelmed.

Just need to buy a few different types at some point to have a play around with. 

To be fair the lamp holders are absolute crap in these lights and there's nothing to say I couldn't do a bit of hacking if it was worth it.  If they were really good quality and in good shape no...but they were poor quality in 1973 and have a shedload of corrosion on the contacts so wouldn't be a huge loss.

I do want to get some of the most eye-searingly bright ones for the high level brake and indicator lights on the van too at some point.  They don't have reflectors either, using optics moulded into the lenses instead.

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That's a pretty low priority task though.  There's a huge number of things above it on the to do list! 

Tell you two things which are low but high priorities... stopping the bloody clutch pedal squeaking and the handbrake cable rattling every time the engine goes above 2500rpm.  These have both bugged the heck out of me since the day I bought it.  Clutch pedal in fact to a week before I bought it as I remember noticing it on the test drive!

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5 minutes ago, dozeydustman said:

They look like the first ones I tried...the output was about on par with the little 5W lamps you'd use in side lights.  They wound up in here!

IMG_20200615_210008.thumb.jpg.d3c1f46099c07f1f878b8c342ae36a0d.jpg

Colour is impressive though, hadn't come across a phosphor amber LED before.

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I did fit LEDs to my Felicia many eons back, they were spherical with the LEDs radiating in a globe shape from the centre but I’ve not seen anything similar for some time. I remember them being very good but this may also be due the difference between 1970s lenses and those from the 1990s.

 

these look interesting 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1157-BAY15D-18-SMD-3030-Car-LED-Bulbs-Indicator-Fog-Brake-Light-Bulb-White-Red-/313455138731?_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286

probably about as much use as an ashtray on a motorcycle though.

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Maybe try the filament style LED type, to as closely as possible replicate the original bulb? We're using those in the Airstream to try and preserve the lifespan of the plastic lenses.

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Managed to actually catch the alternator on the Jag in its non charging state today which is brilliant as it let me check a couple of things.

Most notably that I have confirmed that when it's acting up I have no ignition light.  So either the brushes are worn or sticking - or both.  Whacking it with the handle from my trolly jack made it work again. 

I *think* I can change the brush pack without having to remove the whole alternator from the car.  Reckon with the offside air filter and backing plate off I should be just about able to get to it.  This is great news as it suggests the alternator itself is sound.

With it having been an intermittent fault before it had always rectified itself before I got to a point I could stop so I wasn't sure what was going on, but the alternator has always been a bit weak - hopefully a new set of brushes will sort it.

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On 6/27/2021 at 3:09 AM, LightBulbFun said:

should do! I think about 45Mpg is considered the average for a Model 70 :) so im glad to hear things are improving towards that value

although it can vary from about 35Mpg to 50Mpg depending on exact driving conditions

 

BTW I noticed in your post on another forum that your planning for TPA's next major service

im curious if checking the state of the Dynastart brushes are on that list? or if you have checked TPA's brushes

I was just wondering because I dont think any of us Model 70 owners have checked on our brushes

or at least no ones posted about it

 

(@AdgeCutler's recent work on his Invacar Mk12's Siba Dynastart units made me think "shit I should really check the brushes before I find out the hard way they are worn out and burn out an armature")

It would be well worth checking the state of any dynamos brushes if they are an unknown and could save heartache not far down the line. Having said that, the Villiers type Siba or Bosch units are much more prone to brush wear I would imagine,  the commutator is quite a large diameter and the brushes have to cover a lot  of ground as it were. This combined with the fact the engine is also run in reverse causing the brushes to rock in their holders would mean a faster wear rate. Another thing with the Villiers unit is that the removal of the Dynastart/flywheel would be quite tricky in situ and I suspect (almost expect) that quite often this job would have been neglected ?  

 

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Okay so I'm pretty sure at this point that I'm increasingly convinced that I've cracked rather than bruised at least one of my ribs.  I am *really* sore. 

Had quite a few errands to run today, injured or not.

Did a bit of experimentation and wound up figuring out pretty quickly which car was the least uncomfortable to drive (not going to say it was painless, but it was by far the least painful!).

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TPA to the rescue.  About 50 miles of driving today, but around town, bit out in the dual carriageway, all taken in her stride.

The whole "it gets better with every mile" thing is a terrible cliche...but I'd be lying it that didn't seem to be the case with this little car.  Not sure if some of that is just me getting more used to and comfortable with the car or if it's actually true.

Never fails to make me smile every time I drive her that's for sure.

She needs a wash now though, she's collecting quite the coating of bugs on the nose now.

IMG_20210625_162832.thumb.jpg.2733e4053fa80115988990cb9183fa61.jpg

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  • Zelandeth changed the title to Zel's Motoring Adventures...Jag, Citroens, Mercedes & AC Model 70 - 30/06 - Business as Normal...
1 hour ago, Zelandeth said:

Okay so I'm pretty sure at this point that I'm increasingly convinced that I've cracked rather than bruised at least one of my ribs.  I am *really* sore. 

Had quite a few errands to run today, injured or not.

Did a bit of experimentation and wound up figuring out pretty quickly which car was the least uncomfortable to drive (not going to say it was painless, but it was by far the least painful!).

IMG_20210630_143716.thumb.jpg.68fff07920a25532c10e97b1097561bf.jpg

TPA to the rescue.  About 50 miles of driving today, but around town, bit out in the dual carriageway, all taken in her stride.

The whole "it gets better with every mile" thing is a terrible cliche...but I'd be lying it that didn't seem to be the case with this little car.  Not sure if some of that is just me getting more used to and comfortable with the car or if it's actually true.

Never fails to make me smile every time I drive her that's for sure.

She needs a wash now though, she's collecting quite the coating of bugs on the nose now.

IMG_20210625_162832.thumb.jpg.2733e4053fa80115988990cb9183fa61.jpg

the like is for the TPA out and about and doing well parts, not the Broken rib part!

perhaps I may recommend a visit to a hospital to get it checked out if you think it really is cracked?

although im not sure what they can do, I know you can put a leg or an arm in a cast but not sure how you would put a rib in one... of all the things on my body I have managed to break damage or injure in someway a Rib funnily enough has not been one of those, not yet anyhow!

but if nothing else just to really confuse people at the hospital car park as someone hobbles from and back into an an Invacar :) and see how many people check the date to make sure they have not accidentally walked through a worm hole to 1984!

 

 

 

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I tried to speak to someone about it but just wound up going in circles.  There's not much you can do for rib damage anyway save for getting an X-ray and being told "yep, that's broken." Might be a route to getting prescribed some stronger pain relief but I'd not even count on that.

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4 minutes ago, myglaren said:

Shouldn't it be strapped up until the broken ends glue themselves back together?

Advice from GP: Phone 101.

Advice from 101: Go to A&E.

Response from A&E: Go home. We're only allowing in patients who are in a life threatening condition etc because of COVID.  Phone your GP for advice...

You see where this is going...

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  • Zelandeth changed the title to Zel's Motoring Adventures...Jag, Citroen, Mercs, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5...04/08 - Interior Trim Repairs...

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      I'd been after my first classic car for a while.  If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested.  Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things.  Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap.  The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it.
      So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it.

      It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again.
      Pros
      It's right up my street.  Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm.
      It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim.
      It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock).
      It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over.
      It was cheap.
      Cons
      Most of the front end has been cut off.
      Most of the body structure is quite rotten.
      It's going to take me ages.
      I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there.  So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it.  I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days.
      Cheers 
    • By dome
      This evening I venture forth into hitherto unknown lands (Kirkintilloch) to collect my latest acquisition.

      Which, naturally, has issues.

      I have purchased my first line of defence.



      Which appears to have antigravity properties

      More will follow this evening...
    • By Dick Longbridge
      As with many of the members on here, I tend to read and comment a lot, but haven’t done much in the way of my own shite related posting. The onslaught of miserable teenage goat bummers (©Bollox2019) has encouraged me to share a little more, rather than look at the screen and shake my head. As my fiancée once told me, Dick is for sharing. Or something.
       
      Updates are likely to be sporadic, and not necessarily ‘car project work’ per se. Sometimes it may just be the odd photo.
      Anyway, now the disclaimer is out the way, and without further ado, I’ll start with this.
       
      I bought my Lambretta just over ten years ago. I’ve had a few over the years, and even dabbled with the dark side, or as they are sometimes known, Vespa.
       
      Collection of this scooter involved a fucked Transit, and a day trip to Stoke from sunny Cornwall. Breathing in diesel exhaust fumes which permeated the van through the rusty gaps under the back doors was becoming tiresome by the twelfth hour of driving. We managed it though, and the scooter was well worth the journey. It’s an Italian 1967 SX150, with a 186 Imola kit, plus various other trick bits. It was originally Verde Mela - a rare Innocenti colour - which is basically apple green. Unfortunately the previous owner stripped every last trace of it from the frame, and repainted it in a Peugeot metallic. Not something I could ever bring myself to do, but it looks good all the same.
       
      I had plenty of fun with the scooter, and even made it to the Isle of Wight rally on it (I’ve done this a few times on previous scooters). However, as with many of us, life and house got in the way, and it’s sat in the garage under a cover for way too long.
       
      I hadn’t fired it up for well over 12 months, so decided to drag the old dear out into the sunshine, fire her up, and give her a blast around the estate. I did a quick video of getting the scooter started - no sound because time lapse - startup was a bitch as the fuel was really stale, half evaporated and leaving the oil/ratio mix completely oil heavy. You can make out when it eventually fires up in the video - wait for the smoke around the back end!
       
      I’ll end by adding the startup video. I’ve got a load more photos somewhere on the external HDD, including some of my previous Lambrettas. I'll have to dig them out when I get chance.
       
      TTFN.
       
    • By Fumbler
      To mark the genesis of my fleet project thread I here present my new car: a 1997 Nissan Micra Shape-


      It really looks that good. There is a reason for this: its previous owner was an old lady who loved the thing so much so she made every effort to keep it in good shape. It originally came from Fleet in the GU postcode which suggests to me it was bought by the present dealer at auction, hence arriving down here in Kent. Before seeing the car I checked its MOT history and its only fails were thanks to broken stoplights, which shows me that it was very well cared for. I suppose an example of this was that on the last MOT, an advisory was a corroded rear silencer. The silencer on the car when I saw it was new. Methinks the lady wanted to keep it as good as possible. It was kept in a garage and so all the bumpers and black trim are very black and the tyres are in very good condition. Spare never used! Also included a free Dettol first aid kit from 1997.
      This car has 15000 genuine miles on the clock. We clocked over 15000 during the test drive! The lady owner really only trundled around her village in it and the MOT shows that it only did some meagre miles between tests. This, of course, came at a price. We saw a cherry red Micra from 2002 at the same dealer. Paint was shoddy and when they washed it the boot had massive sections of bare metal and it wasn't very happy. This car, however, is in fabulous condition and there was no contest between the two cars- it really is that good, inside and out. Immaculate interior, driver's airbag, cassette player... all there and all functioning (apart from cassette thanks to new battery and failed display). This meant that I bought it for £1600, £100 over what was my uppermost limit, but I knew I wouldn't see another like this that was in as good shape for a fair while. It was priced very ambitiously, at £1990, so I'm content in the fact I managed to slash a few hundred off the price. There wasn't that much paperwork though. All the dealership received was the logbook with 3 service stamps from 1998, 1999 and 2000, the radio key pass, a National Trust sticker, and the original paperwork holder. I suspect the old lady died and had her car auctioned, and the massive file of paperwork is now someone's egg carton, along will everything else she owned.

      As always, this car isn't exactly in showroom condition. While the inside is great and the floor is solid, and the underseal is in great shape, the not undersealed parts need a small looking at. Mainly the rear of the driver's side sill. It's really the only bubbling on the car. I suspect a well aimed stonechip managed to fester over the wintery salted roads, making it rust even more. It's around the size of a 5p piece, and will give me the opportunity to spray the insides of the sill with some chain oil to prevent any further corrosion. Behind the fuel tank there are a few rusty joints- places where the spraygun cannot get paint onto- which some Vactan and Dynax should put to rights. Alternator belt looks original because of the cracking and Nissan badges and will need doing soon as well as the front plate. As much as I like the 90's font and original dealer surround, the dishevelled R and general water ingress is a persistant MOT advisory. It could be the MOT station being strict (and most likely is considering there's a Saxo down the road with far worse blackening), however for the sake of peace of mind and all that, I'll get a new one made. The rear has already been replaced indicating this has happened before.
      All in all, I think this is a nice plucky motor. I'll have it by the end of the week; just got to sort out tax, insurance, and it's going to have an MOT. As part of the deal it's getting the MOT and an oil and filter change which will be something ticked off the list. It has some love scratches and chips here and there, but it drives well, is stiff and controllable, and should make out to be a nice summer project!
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