Jump to content

Schaefft's Bargain Barge Extravaganza - Cadillac Carnage


Schaefft

Recommended Posts

1 minute ago, wesacosa said:

ah ok.¬† I can't take it on myself sadly so probably best I don't start asking questions that might lead to it appearing on my drive ūüėā

ah what the hell,  maybe send me the list anyway so at least I can talk myself out of it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Schaefft changed the title to Schaefft's Bargain Barge Extravaganza - One In: Alfa 156 Sportwagon

As seen over in the Southern collection thread another addition from one of Italy's most passionate automobile makers has joined the fleet, a late Alfa 156 Sportwagon. It's joining the Alfa 166 Super with the Busso V6 everyone likes to rave about (it sounds great tbf), however this 156 has its own tune that isn't all that much worse, despite being a deceasel.

53829100404_a0563abca0_h.jpg

That's because its got Alfa's rather quirky Commonrail (apparently the first ever in a production car) 20 Valve 5-cylinder, and I have to admit that even at the nearly 170k miles this is showing on the odometer its still sounding great and pulls like any of the V8s I own, its incredible really.

53829206470_03b154f5b4_h.jpg

It might need some engine mounts soon though. At least I won't have to worry about the timing belt anytime soon:

53827853107_34d5385870_b.jpg

The 2.4 20V was actually Alfa's top of the line model in the UK after the facelift, no RHD Bussos made from that point onwards. It's got such an incredible amount of torque in all gears at all speeds that I cannot imagine it making stock power, its proper rapid while doing over 60mpg on the motorway.

Its quite interesting being able to compare this to the bigger 166 (granted mine is a pre-facelift). Its the 166 that was originally supposed to come out before the 156 until Alfa decided that the more mainstream car of the two was apparently the more urgent project, I wouldn't be surprised at all if Alfa was financially struggling in the early 90s and needed a hot new product to turn their luck around. As we all know the 156 was just that, European Car of the Year and everything. Its still a gorgeous piece of design and being an estate (although styled to more look like a sleek shootingbreak before anyone else did) it adds a little bit of rarity as well in my mind.

53829206280_4b55b6d536_h.jpg

Hidden doorhandles to imitate coupe looks started right here with the 156 as well. Apparently the estate has less boot space than the saloon, no clue how that's possible but the roof cutout to allow for a larger tailgate opening is quite a clever bit of design that I never noticed before, so is the integrated spoiler:

53829206310_160336cdac_h.jpg

53828768671_4f759601be_h.jpg

Plenty of space in here, the rear seat naturally folds down, the load cover is exactly what you'd expect. The rear strut towers intrude quite a bit into the cargo space, something that BMW resolved in a much more clever way in the E39.

53829098844_ad206defe3_h.jpg

You do get some hidden storage though:

53829206360_ba5b411dbc_b.jpg

53827853052_565f273270_b.jpg

6-disc changer, lets see what we got in there then:

53829098794_fe8fcae0a0_h.jpg

My CD collection gets more extensive with every car purchase. At least I now know that it plays CD-RWs.

53828768731_465f070d49_h.jpg

Complete toolkit, always a good sign. Spare wheel is a steelie.

Back on the outside. The Facelift was styled by Giugiaro, they did a great job I think. Apparently the Veloce badge is supposed to be there. I'm not the biggest fan of these thin spoke wheels considering the great designs you could get for the 156 but they won't go anywhere anytime soon, decent tires on it as well.

53829008553_7a8c7b8cc0_h.jpg

I didn't know what the interior looked like until I saw the car in person. I'm a fan of unusual colors and having another blue leather interior (the Celsior is the other car) was a positive surprise. The driver seat bolster has seen better days but everything else has held up fairly well. It just needs a proper clean really.

53829098699_e194d17c4e_h.jpg

Wood steering wheel badly needed here. Aside from that the only thing I'm missing is cruise control, might be able to retrofit it fairly easily (haven't investigated yet). A/C blows cold, what more do you want from a sub-£600 car? No soft-touch sticky insanity like in the 166 here either, in general the interior design seems much more coherent and better thought out, another indicator that this is the newer design despite being launched before the 166.

53829098709_294f3c583a_h.jpg

Even came with what could be the original floor mats. And a boot release in a location that's easy to reach, imagine that.

53829008578_a972dd585f_h.jpg

So there we are then. I'll see if I can start cleaning it up a bit over the next few days. Not everything is perfect and I already got a growing list of things that would need doing to make it all look properly good again. But all that will hinge on the rust situation underneath which certainly won't be pretty when you look at the MOT history.

53829098929_82569eb358_h.jpg

With such a great engine, great looks and a mountain of receipts for work that has been done over the last few years I think this one is worth saving though. 156s aren't getting any more common at this point after all. We'll see what things look like on the weekend hopefully.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very glad this has remained within the forum,.it remains the best 156 I've had of the seven (!!) I've had so far.

It was between this and the Marea when it came to selling up, I think I kept the right one but I can feel that 156 itch creeping back..at least it's the same (shorter) platform. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, bramz7 said:

Very glad this has remained within the forum,.it remains the best 156 I've had of the seven (!!) I've had so far.

It was between this and the Marea when it came to selling up, I think I kept the right one but I can feel that 156 itch creeping back..at least it's the same (shorter) platform. 

It really seems to be a good one. If you don't mind I'd like to send you a pm to get a little bit more info about the previous owner. Always interesting to rebuild the history of a car.

In other news, I picked up a replacement side terminal battery for the Deville on the way back from Bath. Unfortunately that didn't fix the shifting issues (automatic shift into 3rd is basically like shifting into neutral). Checked the fluid which looks good but it was completely overfilled (I don't think I ever topped up the fluid). Pumped out a liter of ATF to see if it makes any difference, unfortunately no. Considering that this issue showed up very suddenly it can only be a shift solenoid problem (or gummed up channel/valve) so I'm going to order the parts needed to replace it soon. If anyone else has another theory before I take it all apart please let me know!

It does look good in the Tesco carpark though:

53829098914_e0aecd6788_h.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had one very similar, a pre-facelift, agree with everything you say about the engine, and the interior just being a nice place to be. 

Shame they couldn't make them not rust, those rear floorpans are made of wafer-thin metal and are an absolute pain in the arse to weld when they go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 02/07/2024 at 08:16, Dave_Q said:

I had one very similar, a pre-facelift, agree with everything you say about the engine, and the interior just being a nice place to be. 

Shame they couldn't make them not rust, those rear floorpans are made of wafer-thin metal and are an absolute pain in the arse to weld when they go.

I've had a look underneath, it actually doesn't look that bad at all (immediately jinxed myself), one of the strut towers has some crustiness I dont want to poke too much before the MOT though.

Gave the car a wash today, its been a while since the last time.

53833200961_6546e60a01_h.jpg

53833200951_7d934fb1f6_h.jpg

53833444383_d5af0dcdef_h.jpg

53832356897_ad7f6f61a6_h.jpg

53833522103_1044d1e309_h.jpg

Mandatory foam photo:

53833638095_135a022892_h.jpg

That's better:

53832289217_8d6a1686da_h.jpg

53833637950_f2197864bd_h.jpg

53833444168_abdd101187_h.jpg

53833638005_0961716564_h.jpg

53833638040_cf0b0dd59e_h.jpg

53833539884_3b6ddf5c8a_h.jpg

53833201016_666bbf1bc0_h.jpg

Wheels and interior maybe tomorrow but 2 hours spent well right there, must be worth at least 5 quid more nowūüėā

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally had some time to look through the history file, which covers almost 20 years of serious commitment of a single owner keeping the Sportwagon on the road. It's quite impressive really, even at a time when these were near worthless (still aren't all that valuable) he kept throwing money at whatever needing doing according to his Alfa specialist, sometimes twice or even 3 times a year.

image.png.dce36c68ff8513be130fbbbd4bf17c2a.png

The bill of sale reveals that he bought the car from Hylton Worcester (long wiped from the face of the earth by the looks of it, theres only a BBC radio studio at the address) at 17 months old for around 13 grand, thats quite the discount compared to MSRP considering the first owner before him only covered about 3k miles in it. Trade in: a V6 Cougar!

53834401632_d2d340a277_b.jpg

Being the 2nd owner that annual mileage changed pretty quickly, the miles were piled on fairly quickly, fortunately he kept up with the services, too:

53835645764_f2970f7f45_b.jpg

Funnily enough even Alfa Romeo didn't expect the 156 to survive beyond 132k miles so the service book had to be extended:

53835300441_2ab7544f39_b.jpg

And even that doesn't cover all of them as he kept going all the way into last year. It would take hours to cover the entire service history so here are just the most interesting expenses:

53834401602_f2514af8e0_b.jpg

An ECU upgrade! I'm not sure what said upgrade entails but it would finally explain the impressive grunt the car has. Might have to reach out to NJS (whos name seems vaguely familiar for some reason) to see what that would gain the 2.4 JTD in power.

53835740040_cf2f6ec72d_b.jpg

Rebuilt turbo 30k miles ago, I'll take that as a positive.

53834401502_6e585d25c2_b.jpg

All springs and shock absorbers 15k miles ago. In general the 156 seems go through suspension parts like crazy, eating control arms at probably twice the rate of its German equivalents (which are already kinda bad compared to a Lexus).

53835300396_4a35b6f825_b.jpg

Last timing belt less than 15k miles/4 years ago, the 3rd timing belt change over the car's life.

53835645654_45f0126c0a_b.jpg

Another set of front springs a year ago. There was another front spring replaced between the two dates above... Also the most recent piece of welding work.

53835549228_bb93205dd1_b.jpg

A/C recharged a few years ago, which means its holding charge permanently as it is still blowing nice and cold.

53835740045_7c2d29468b_b.jpg

There's absolute stacks of service history all the way to more or less exactly a year ago. After seeing this mentioned by HMC in his thread it seemed pretty clear to me that this must be a good one. It may need a few bits and pieces here and there to be a solid longterm keeper but years of commitment by Mr. Evans really has paid off in my mind. Here it is at the owner's address a few months before it was picked up by bramz.

image.png.11eb741572eece39021d7e4a4391d1a0.png

I really hope that Golf estate isn't its replacement. I'm actually surprised he let it go for what must have been pretty little money. Part of the reason might be some crustiness on one of the shock towers. None of that is unfixable though so fingers crossed we won't find too many other things to worry about come Saturday.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The impressive history made me loathe to put a cheap battery in the engine bay, hence the shiny big Bosch, and the Bosch aero wipers (soz, they're good wipers for anyone who thinks otherwise), I couldn't let it get cheap parts after a lifetime of not! 

I won it on eBay for £620. It felt like I'd mugged him but they're really hard to value and I think the high mileage scared people. Their loss!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, bramz7 said:

The impressive history made me loathe to put a cheap battery in the engine bay, hence the shiny big Bosch, and the Bosch aero wipers (soz, they're good wipers for anyone who thinks otherwise), I couldn't let it get cheap parts after a lifetime of not! 

I won it on eBay for £620. It felt like I'd mugged him but they're really hard to value and I think the high mileage scared people. Their loss!

620 quid is criminal but then again thats what they usually do on ebay, here's another one for not that much more which seemed like an absolute bargain:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/395314019450?itmmeta=01J1ZT2NPJ8465EKYDQ79GGAKW&hash=item5c0a8d3c7a:g:GzsAAOSw4mJmDRdx&itmprp=enc%3AAQAJAAAA4PzHc02%2FFzOJQluMVnJbULzz3DdVX1cb1ehC5TXb1lq1%2BOo2p6HBx1r7Mstm%2Fj4UUGLZBKhevOZwrFTfMjBO2CNAAKH1CXoRLQzzDdm1j1H%2FNIYXrL571kov81TdmPmwqXOOBLO7d4dGXZ%2B5%2B%2FsR35b2KtvNQui19bIXJC7QLw5vJLhMmhzAzbV%2BDWpyNBvdeZe%2FaNdtTduAblMk7qRKF%2FxFv4sHCSBrrpySKAbwh%2FDmIke2%2BepH1w0UguwfWvvBUXVdt9kW62s4jesUpkvmnzdbLEx%2BwkVLWmkBGPwK5x9S|tkp%3ABk9SR7zbivqPZA

I'll reach out to the previous owner to see if he has any extra info about the ECU upgrade, the one above claims some pretty impressive numbers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 01/07/2024 at 23:29, Schaefft said:

Apparently the estate has less boot space than the saloon, no clue how that's possible but the roof cutout to allow for a larger tailgate opening is quite a clever bit of design that I never noticed before, so is the integrated spoiler:

Warning: Alfa geekout

It really doesn't. Contemporary car journos were a bit* dishonest. That myth is coming from the usable space under that luggage cover being smaller than the usable area of the saloon. Roll back or remove the cover though, and it's, obviously, much more spacious. 

This is a consequence of an estate having the same basic bodyshell as the saloon, with the estate hatch being grafted on the back. The start of the hatch is at the exact length where the saloon car's roof is ending. Supposedly Alfa didn't even consider making an estate when they were designing 156, but were forced by FIAT management, as it was the hot body type of the day, so they just grafted some windows and a hatch and called it a day. 

The final result looks amazing, but has a high boot lip, odd V-shaped opening, and hatch door fouling the cargo space as it's not flat up but sloped inwards. The estates commonly suffer from the rear camber being toe-in as the rear suspension is shared between the estate and saloon as well. Overloading the estate's not-all-that-great carrying capacity, already compromised by having more weight on the rear because of the body shape, results in bent rear struts. The insult to injury is that bit of rear struts is not adjustable, so you can't fix the camber with an alignment, but you need new struts.


Amazing cars, but not all that great in being estates. I hope you enjoy yours as much as I'm enjoying mine. There's nothing quite like it that I've ever had or driven. If I had to pick between selling it and my 159, 159 would go, despite my 156 being much leggier than my 159. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All of the above makes total sense. I was wandering around Rijeka in Croatia today and saw a 156 saloon with the 2.4JTD. It sounded like a police car siren indicating turbo failure was imminent, and the nearside rear wheel had a lot of camber on.

 

this looks a total buy though, that’s had an owner that was in it for the long run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Schaefft changed the title to Schaefft's Bargain Barge Extravaganza - Cadillac Carnage

Some great insight there @IronStar, I didn't notice but the bodyshell indeed is mostly saloon with a roof extension crafted on, yet it turned out very successfully visually.

We've had a look underneath yesterday. The previous MOT welding could be better (and will get improved eventually, as usual whoever did the work was just lazy and bodged it, noone takes pride in their work anymore), however it would be anything but impossible to get it through a test next month with very little work needed (slight leak from a CV boot), suspension wise everything is rock solid and corrosion isn't all that much of a problem in the areas that are visible, surprising considering this Alfa has seen 19 winters. That means theres little stopping me from starting to gather some parts for it now, a set of badges is badly needed.

53841894775_7ef0e79b05_h.jpg

After a week and over 800 miles in the 156 it's time for it to go into storage for a little while though. The next few weeks will be very busy for me, preparing multiple cars for their MOT and the Cadillac for a trip to Germany and Paris at the end of the month. With insurance premiums still rising I wouldn't want to to insure and tax yet another car long-term, none of this will be an issue once we move to our new property though (slow progress there, still waiting for the sellers to submit their documents).

53841450326_0fc5c8009f_h.jpg

One of those cars is the Corona which needs a washer pump and sticky caliper sorting. The Alfa has taken it's space for now. Really hoping that having more space will mean that these two Auroras (and my 528i in between them) will finally receive some attention.

53840555977_17b44067e3_h.jpg

I've mentioned the Cadillac. Ideally I'd want to sort all of its issues before the trip. The plan is to take it to Fotu24, then straight after that take the ferry from Harwich to the hook of Holland and from there to a mate of mine near Duesseldorf who's just as obsessed as me where a new windshield for the Deville is waiting. I'd then leave the car there for a week and take the train home (where the 523i Touring is waiting with a fresh TUV). After a week there we'd take the train back to collect the Cadillac and take it to Paris for the Olympic games, after which I'd take the ferry back to the UK.

That's quite the trip for a car that currently only has 2 forward gears, no A/C and is spreading its axle grease all over the undercarriage. Parts to sort all these issues arrived on Friday and will tomorrow so lets make a start:

53841716288_376f3aafa3_h.jpg

Since the forecast said rain in the afternoon I planned to just do the boot today. Should be easy enough, right...? First things first, two bolts that hold the strut to the knuckle, which came off surprisingly easy.

53841804244_a476b50019_b.jpg

53841450456_cf5af2dda4_h.jpg

Next step, remove 34mm hub nut. Turns out I don't have any 34mm sockets, so quick trip to Halfrauds in style:

53841514426_e1c34e2edb_h.jpg

Having just been behind the wheel of a brand new Ypsilon in Sicily recently this was a welcome spot, I completely forgot that this gen was still sold as Chrysler in the UK and shows how long they built them:

53841894680_aa6ce2c6da_h.jpg

One 34mm impact socket richer, over 10 quid poorer. Devilles (and therefore Sevilles, fwd Fleetwoods and probably Eldorados as well as pretty much anything else GM big and fwd) used the same front suspension design from the mid-80s all the way to the 2000s so hopefully it will come in handy again in the future.

53841894620_958136c374_z.jpg

No photos of this step but the hub nut came off surprisingly easily with the impact as well. A few blows with a sledge hammer and the axle was sliding out the hub eventually. The other end didn't cooperate quite as much so I cut the boot instead:

53841450391_c9b52755d4_h.jpg

The transmission side of an axle, nothing too surprising there. Despite the leak there was plenty of clean grease left.

53841450416_230d955593_h.jpg

53840555832_3bdc6fd89e_h.jpg

To get the boot on the axle needs to be disassembled, snap ring on the top and bottom need to go first:

53841450306_7d9bdd9e7c_h.jpg

Aside from a missing socket things have been going surprisingly easily. Until I slid the axle back in and tried to pull the new silicon boot over the transmission end. Well, turns on that grease absolutely everywhere, a very tight fitting boot and a complete lack of grooves or anything really to hold the boot in place is a recipe for an absolute shitshow. I've easily spent an hour somehow trying to pull the boot over a rubber seal and somehow get the metal clamp or a bunch of zipties around it before it would slip straight off again. My patience was long gone by the time the new boot started to tear, half of the estate probably heard my opinion of the design of it all and the person responsible for it. Desperate times require desperate measures so I eventually took the stapler and put an end to it all after having to remove the axle several times:

53841716013_40a616b36d_h.jpg

The staples were just about enough to hold the boot in place so I could get some zipties around it to seal properly. In fact I don't even care if it doesn't seal properly, its one of those jobs I never wanna do again. Rockauto sells some dodgy looking quick fit boots where you glue two halves together form a tight seal, I'd rather replace one of those once every year than attempt this again.

53841894460_fbbd393d25_h.jpg

The zipties plus staples should keep it on there for a while. I've cut the excess tails and put a regular heavy duty hose clamp on the axle end and spun the wheel around a few times. There's still sufficient play in the boot even with axle extended and the wheels hanging down, it should make it to Germany and back.

If the weather plays along I'll drop the transmission pan and valve body over the next few evening to replace the 2-3 shift solenoid and give the transmission a service, fingers crossed thats whats preventing the gearbox from shifting into 3rd instead of neutral. Naturally no drain plug so another mess about to happen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, don't you just love how manufactures do everything in their power to make servicing simple? Sometimes, I too think that slow roasting over an open fire is too good for them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad that Alfa is now close to home, I know you usually keep hold of your cars but if you do come to move the 156 on do let me know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting to see that Cadillac are doing a nice normal bolt-on strut at the front... Do you happen to know if all K-body(?) cars are like that? What kind of setup do they have at the rear - seperate spring and shock? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, yes oui si said:

Interesting to see that Cadillac are doing a nice normal bolt-on strut at the front... Do you happen to know if all K-body(?) cars are like that? What kind of setup do they have at the rear - seperate spring and shock? 

It does have adaptable dampers but in reality thats just one more electrical connector for an internal motor that moves a valve, beyond that its all standard steel springs and dampers. I think they have rear height regulation but that doesn't add much complexity either as its all integrated into the damper. And yeah, a quick search tells me that K-cars (and therefore pretty much anything fwd Mopar up to the Imperial I assume) was McPherson strut in the front and beam axle in the back.

Technical drawing Diagram Drawing Line art Parallel

Sourcing axles from common vehicles ? | Expedition Portal

Something I forgot to mention yesterday: I've reached out to the long term owner of the Alfa through Ebay. The "ECU Upgrade" was not for improving engine output but to map out the EGR which naturally was a common issue. Since I doubt that this has any effect on torque numbers the 20 Valve JTD 5-cylinder really must be pulling so well from standard, very impressive. I can't imagine what its like with the tune!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A lot of people swear about split CV boots but I've never had any issues with them.  The one I put on the Renault 6 a couple of years ago is still going strong - in fact it looks like it's going to fail due to perishing before the glued join comes apart.  At least one I've fitted in the past (to the Rover 200) passed two successive MOTs without issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, wuvvum said:

A lot of people swear about split CV boots but I've never had any issues with them.  The one I put on the Renault 6 a couple of years ago is still going strong - in fact it looks like it's going to fail due to perishing before the glued join comes apart.  At least one I've fitted in the past (to the Rover 200) passed two successive MOTs without issue.

That's good enough for me, next one I'll be doing will be one of those then!

Today's grocery hauler, surrounded by concentrated blandness:

IMG_20240708_185623.jpg.cb352ea373bf2cb6e8b2d4e60acb8207.jpg

Just imagine what you could have had for the price of that miserable Eco Sport.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are 2 Z3s within 1/4 mile of me. 2 seaters haven't worked for me before but I'm trying to think positive as I really like them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 08/07/2024 at 22:44, Split_Pin said:

There are 2 Z3s within 1/4 mile of me. 2 seaters haven't worked for me before but I'm trying to think positive as I really like them!

As I've mentioned before they are seriously undervalued but then that applies to the much newer Z4 as well. Can't go wrong with a facelift in the right color with the right engine. It's not a long distance cruiser (soft top just doesn't isolate you from the wind noise enough) but it's a simple, cheap to own great looking BMW roadster that people still seem to think is decent money.

People probably think exactly the opposite when seeing the Corona. We've had a look around the village that will hopefully soon be our new home today, the local petrol station has quite a bit of retro charm.

IMG_20240712_202445.jpg.60959746415e2a632a9af53a415f2e74.jpg

The pub a few minutes down the road is a popular car meet destination, certainly looks promising.

IMG_20240712_204522.jpg.4e3b627800f83f1b463de870d3366a55.jpg

Sporty Mondeo parked outside:

IMG_20240712_204439.jpg.2a6a64193b87a9d816f515a83e1c1aaa.jpg

IMG_20240712_204450.jpg.3ba04d5f2a02563c135673838eae1270.jpg

IMG_20240712_204502.jpg.e2adb8a7e0dbac269da38dc0858f9c49.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorted the last few things out at my better half's grandma's house today which will be sold soon (only took over 2 years). Being a slightly weathered Victorian town house the Jag didn't look out of place outside.

IMG_20240713_1339062.jpg.320aa63af7936f20bb030546550b755d.jpg

As you can imagine, quite a few throwbacks to a different time can be found inside (just like in the XJ!). How about the local used car classifieds from 1959?

IMG_20240713_134051.jpg.8f821665e7c9a6c3ddc7da4d080348bb.jpg

Anyone in the market for a like-new Morris Minor or Austin A40?

IMG_20240713_134057.jpg.19f7ef9496d2e67acc4c278857cdb1e3.jpg

IMG_20240713_134103.jpg.b933a4e9be15bedf9b779fb7d13195ba.jpg

IMG_20240713_134105.jpg.dbdce5313da27bcf4fd2cda2c8174309.jpg

IMG_20240713_134112.jpg.ee1521c4d4625fbbcc186ead018075a6.jpg

IMG_20240713_134124.jpg.7d0290f1adf19263d945e23fdc8e6dd4.jpg

We didn't take much but the boot of an XJ can hold quite a few treasures* fortunately.

IMG_20240713_174105.jpg.31f4e9c2b376663ee492b0db73677873.jpg

Parked next to an LS430 on our way back. I know the Jag sits lower than normal but damn.

IMG_20240713_1711172.jpg.2c8db6e00f48969a5e578d23b7219fad.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...