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LML STAR.. just bought another one

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Some time ago now, this thread started with me owning two of these, A Vespa version and an LML version. The reasons why were convoluted and the only place I could share my logic was here.. I sold the Vespa and have been loving the LML ever since. 

 

Anyway, fast forward to now and an identical LML turns up for very cheap on Facebook with the same "unsolvable" electrical issues as mine had way back when. I fought through the Facebook feeding frenzy victorious, to be collected on Tuesday. Fuck!

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My t5 had "unsolvable" electrical issues too... part of the reason I sold it.  Rear indicator stopped working on one side, I couldn't get to the bottom of it and gave up.

 

What are the problems with this? Dibs (maybe) if you decide to sell. :)

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It’s the indicators on this one too. Always is.

 

It’s a combo of things- the bulb holders are terrible quality, so I usually just put a metal one into the housing

The AC flasher circuit is an insane design, so you can just take a DC feed from the regulator and use a solid state DC flasher.

The wiring of the switch is insane, and needs to be replaced with an improved design with strain relief and screw terminals.

The cables are usually stretched to within an inch of their life, so need to be worked carefully through the bodywork to give a bit of slack at the switch end

The design of being earthed through the side panel spring is nuts- everything needs to be sanded back to fresh metal on the contact area

The positive feed through the side panel pin usually needs some emery action.

 

Voila- working indicators (temporarily)

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It’s the indicators on this one too. Always is.

 

It’s a combo of things- the bulb holders are terrible quality, so I usually just put a metal one into the housing

The AC flasher circuit is an insane design, so you can just take a DC feed from the regulator and use a solid state DC flasher.

The wiring of the switch is insane, and needs to be replaced with an improved design with strain relief and screw terminals.

The cables are usually stretched to within an inch of their life, so need to be worked carefully through the bodywork to give a bit of slack at the switch end

The design of being earthed through the side panel spring is nuts- everything needs to be sanded back to fresh metal on the contact area

The positive feed through the side panel pin usually needs some emery action.

 

Voila- working indicators (temporarily)

 

Well, I'm glad it's not just me. Drove me mental. I don't think I want another after all. I'll get a Honda next time. Have fun with it! 

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I nearly forgot, sometimes the loom breaks too where it pass through the handlebars. Just imagine Italian design made to a budget in India. 

 

The switches and other minor electrical bits are the only things that are worse in LML's- everything else is better or the same. Once you've chased away the electrical issues you're left with a more rust-resistant, reed valved PX. Racks front and back, two up etc, it's unbelievably useful. Ulez compliant too, but with the smell of two stroke and the fun of gears.  Solid gold! 

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I nearly forgot, sometimes the loom breaks too where it pass through the handlebars. Just imagine Italian design made to a budget in India. 

 

The switches and other minor electrical bits are the only things that are worse in LML's- everything else is better or the same. Once you've chased away the electrical issues you're left with a more rust-resistant, reed valved PX. Racks front and back, two up etc, it's unbelievably useful. Ulez compliant too, but with the smell of two stroke and the fun of gears.  Solid gold! 

 

Now you've made me want one again... 

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had a vespa douglas (dunno what the difference is?) years ago, and could never get used to the gear change, almost broke my wrist getting into 4th gear!

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had a vespa douglas (dunno what the difference is?) years ago, and could never get used to the gear change, almost broke my wrist getting into 4th gear!

I think the Douglas bit just means that they were built in the UK under licence- just as they were built in India as LML. In Spain they were called motovespa, etc. Same with lambrettas.

 

The gears can take a bit of getting used to, though loads are made worse by poor adjustment. They’re never totally great but then it’s a flippin shopping trolley, not a Ferrari.

 

I’ve got a badly broken left arm with loads of metal in it, so I see the clutch and gears as handy physio on my commute..

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The new one had a crazy heavy clutch, replaced the cable and now it's got a crazy light clutch. It must have a later Vespa Cosa style clutch which is a bonus. I'll be keeping that if I move it on. 

Removed the rack, should get £40 or so for that, Removed the horrible seat cover. It's looking better already and runs like a champ. Just need to get round to the electrics.. 

 

IMG-0094.thumb.JPG.f234ea6e853620108dcb442df83ffa2a.JPGIMG-0093.thumb.JPG.8335f4fb10b0253d24520e2c5cd3e19a.JPGIMG-0092.thumb.JPG.579168292cb4249b6f3299a742331845.JPG

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You should make them look exactly the same. Take it in turns to ride them with the same number plate on both, then you can have just one insurance policy, one MOT and one bit of road tax, thus sticking 2 fingers up to the System and the Man. 

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3 hours ago, purplebargeken said:

You should make them look exactly the same. Take it in turns to ride them with the same number plate on both, then you can have just one insurance policy, one MOT and one bit of road tax, thus sticking 2 fingers up to the System and the Man. 

I’d be lying if I said the thought hadn’t crossed my mind 

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