Jump to content

Truck Shite


quicksilver

Recommended Posts

19 minutes ago, Datsuncog said:

Spotted the other day over at council playing fields - possibly a showman's wagon linked to a nearby travelling fairground.

IMG_20211022_182544.thumb.jpg.c3721ac2d9ffd660b955c962cdd3bbd6.jpg

Can't imagine there'd be a lot of these ERFs still in regular use otherwise.

Looks like an ex Beechs ERF too, with a Stoke on Trent reg. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Datsuncog said:

Spotted the other day over at council playing fields - possibly a showman's wagon linked to a nearby travelling fairground.

IMG_20211022_182544.thumb.jpg.c3721ac2d9ffd660b955c962cdd3bbd6.jpg

Can't imagine there'd be a lot of these ERFs still in regular use otherwise.

Definitely a fairground wagon - that's the Showmen's Guild logo on the dashboard. Almost certainly started out as a 4x2 tractor unit and got stretched into that form in the classic fairground fashion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spotted doing showman's duties recently: a pair of Iveco Stralises! I've got a soft spot for the bloody things for a few reasons, but I'm not blind to their shortcomings. Presumably the short journeys and long lay-ups work in their favour: less opportunities for them to go bang, more time to fix them when they do. And they do. I once inherited a Trakker (the tipper version) that went like snaw aff a dyke until it shat its' head gasket on the M876 one afternoon.  According to the fitter, that was the second replacement. It was under three years old and had 90 thousand k's on the clock...

On the other hand...imagine my delight to hear this roaring up the road...Newtyle Commercials' 'Dragon Wagon' which I've been after for ages. Think the plate on the grille says 'EC12' (but don't quote me on that) which means the Perkins (ex-Rolls) Eagle, unless it's a Cat or a Detroit DD60, which were options. It's not a Cummins anyway, but what a racket! Glorious...

IMG_20211027_155131.jpg

Edited by CreepingJesus
Apostrophe in the wrong place? Panda says no!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I shall duly stand corrected @Noel Tidybeard: I must be thinking of something else. But yeah, that narrows it down to Cummins 11 litre. I think...

Cadzow Heavy Haulage used to have one of the EC14-525's in eight legger, 150 ton+ form. That thing sounded brutal. I had a sound recording somewhere of that and their V8 Titan in convoy pulling big chunks of boat metal from Rolls Royce Marine, which sadly I can't find. I'd issue it as a symphony!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, CreepingJesus said:

Spotted doing showman's duties recently: a pair of Iveco Stralises! I've got a soft spot for the bloody things for a few reasons, but I'm not blind to their shortcomings. Presumably the short journeys and long lay-ups work in their favour: less opportunities for them to go bang, more time to fix them when they do.

 

That'll be David Thomson. He has a liking for the Stralis for some inexplicable reason and I think has four or five of them now. As far as I know they're unique and no other showman has one, although the little Cargos are very popular.

I had an interesting conversation with the driver of one of the big and very rare Stralis 570s. He said it was his fifth Stralis and the first four were mostly okay but this one was crap and forever suffering various issues, so Iveco somehow managed to make them worse as the years went by!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does seem to be luck of the draw how your Stralis experience turns out. If you've got a good one, it'll be golden. If you haven't, you'd be better getting another one. The first one I had, was a gem, but at a year old the locker doors were rusting, and various bits of interior trim used to fall off at random, usually while at a standstill. The old acronym 'It Vibrates, Everything Comes Off' wasn't actually all that true. Still amusing though. The last one I had was the yard mutt, because all the other drivers favoured the DAFs they were replacing them with. The only concrete reason they could give for hating on the thing, boiled down to my old pal ArseTronic, and were problems common to (at least in my direct experience) MANs, if not all the other brands fitted with the hateful thing. And strangely enough, that one was 5-6 years old iirc, around 500thou kms and had no rust, and a mostly okay interior.

If I go back further, I had a EuroStar in my early days that confused me as to how the revs went up by 250 if I selected high split: yep, the factory put (or wired/plumbed) the splitter switch in upside down! Not so much 'Fix It Again, Toni', as 'why didn't you build the bugger right in the first place, Toni?' I did enjoy driving that one too, but it was my first object lesson in being on your toes with Italian trucks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, High Jetter said:

90 thousand K's???

Yep. And to be clear, that was the second blown head gasket in under twelve months. Fixed at the Iveco dealer with genuine parts each time, too.

I'd had to fill the header tank before I set off that morning, and I had a 25L drum of water on board anyway. Used all that, brimmed it at lunchtime, phoned to explain the situation, and I was on the way to the garage when it let go. Bloody thing had character, or a sense of humour or something, I'll say that much!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does the Stralis still struggle in the rain? 
 

i started my apprenticeship in 2004 at an Iveco/Ford dealer. Every time it rained the breakdown guy slid down his fireman’s pole straight into his van and off out he went to the rescue of a dead stralis. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, sutty2006 said:

Does the Stralis still struggle in the rain? 
 

i started my apprenticeship in 2004 at an Iveco/Ford dealer. Every time it rained the breakdown guy slid down his fireman’s pole straight into his van and off out he went to the rescue of a dead stralis. 

I had a mission impossible job, I started as a salesman at an Iveco dealer when these hopeless heaps were introduced. After barely a year of selling mostly Daily vans and pickups (that are also total shite) I left. If I’d been doing the same job 20 years previous I’d have been selling bucket loads of Ford D series!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/10/2019 at 1:28 PM, sutty2006 said:

A14 west bound. USAF fire engine. Coooooooooooooool

C46805EA-86D0-48D2-B668-A040B2538916.jpeg

A14 west bound. Exactly 2 years to the day spotted this dodge pick up. Funnily enough from the USAF fire department on government plates. Still had yank red flashers on the back. 

BA3EE5C9-9397-411C-8BB8-C5BF0F434FED.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the big to the ridiculous -

image.png.f133fb34d6020ca701d261fcd1e04c8f.png

BELAZ-75710 the largest mining dumper on the planet; it has a 450 tonne load capacity.

image.png.ca4e399c364242575430f40b250a1300.png

An M62 'Mashka' diesel electric locomotive mounted on a MAZ-547 chassis. Why? it's not clear - it has been suggested it could have been used as a mobile generation station.

https://www.thedrive.com/news/39244/the-legend-of-russias-lost-diesel-electric-12x12-overlanding-train

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/10/2021 at 7:30 AM, Split_Pin said:

Hey have we had the fact that the DAF Cabtech cab has finally been replaced after 34 years?

My Brother in Law works for DAF and was at the launch of the new XF and XG/XG+ models. They look very similar to current Scanias.

That cab design has certainly earned a well-deserved rest!

Just to run down how many manufacturers have or are using that base design I have the following:

DAF, ERF, Seddon Atki, Pegaso, Foden, Western Star and then using even more badge engineering, GINAF and Tatra. Any others? 

In the early days in particular, say up to 2000 when there was a seemingly bigger choice out there, what would the main differences be between each manufacturer? Chassis types, engine types? I know there was a fair amount of loyalty amongst smaller operators to the smaller suppliers, but I'm not overly knowledgeable  on trucks beyond that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/14/2021 at 7:08 PM, martc said:

There is some speculation that it could have been an experiment for all wheel steering + all wheel drive. But why put a loco on top of the chassis?

For the same reasons a Leyland National body ended up on a freight wagon chassis: the bits were there, and known to work, so it was easier to smash them together than start from scratch. I would assume!

As for the Cabtec cab, there was very little commonality beyond the cab. One of the more expensive bits to develop, and one of the bits that can really damn the rest of the truck, so plenty of makers saw it as a no-brainer. As above, it's a fixed price, it works and it's there, smash it on.

Besides, engines tended to have a longer development life, gearboxes/axles/steering gear etc., most were buying from Eaton/ZF/Rockwell et al., anyway, and chassis are usually quite locally specific, surprisingly. In terms of how the local market favours them to be made: welded vs bolted vs riveted and so on. 

From a supplier's point of view, an 'old' cab is far more marketable than an 'old' engine. One can be gussied up, the other's a boat anchor if it isn't even fit for use in Africa...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...