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Henry Cortina 2000GXL vs Vauxshite Victor FD VX4/90 mag roadtest Jan 1972


JeeExEll

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Interesting article.  Shows just how slick Ford were in the 70s at turning out basic cars that people actually wanted to buy.  I think that the VX might have been quieter at speed with the overdrive but it does bring it home that Vauxhall were making a car that could easily have been better.

 

I recollect also that Ford really made a massive range of different status models so that company buyers could match job status with model far better than with the Vauxhall, or indeed many other makes.  The difference is sales volumes between the two was colossal I seem to remember.

 

After about five years, I am sure that the VX would have been rusty but the Cortina would have dissolved.  I do find the tyre wear comments a bit strange and we are comparing a new model with a run out one here.  

 

Thanks for sharing.

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Good find that old article.

Cortina for me though, and that includes over a Triumph or Rover too!

The mk3 was just such a great looking car, and it has the pinto engine too which I love. The mk3/4/5 Cortina has to be one of my fav cars ever I think. Sad that isn't it!

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So the Cortina was less shitty than the Vauxhall?

Missing rad caps and loose sump plugs, that's hardcore, makes you wonder just who they employed at car plants back in those days.

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Am not sure if the cars featured were factory supplied to the magazine for evaluation or just cars randomly sourced from main dealers.

I'm sure mag review cars were often pre production cars that were used for evaluation and testing purposes, some were also sent to dealerships for training mechanics on the latest products. Not really all that surprising the quality wasn't quite there with such cars, especially after they'd had a good thrashing by the motoring press!

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There's a very early S reg mk3 Capri that was a Ford press car that was featured in PC mag a few years ago. It had a VHK series number plate but when it was taken apart for restoration it looked like it had actually started life intended to be a mk2!

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Motoring Which was different to other magazines of the day in that they bought all the cars they reviewed anonymously. They are pure consumer reports and the magazine contained no advertising, therefore scarily they are much more representative of what the unfortunate public had foisted on them .

The road tests in normal magazines ,even the 'longtermers' would have been carefully* prepared , which if you read some of the problems ,say, Autocar or Motor had with test cars , is even more worrying at the lax standards of mNufacturers and importers.

 

When this test was conducted the FD was at the end of its life and the Mark3 had just been launched, surprising that the VX4/90 stood up so well. Pity BL/BMC didn't have a representative in the test, wasn't the Wolesley 16/60 still available in 1971?

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There's a very early S reg mk3 Capri that was a Ford press car that was featured in PC mag a few years ago. It had a VHK series number plate but when it was taken apart for restoration it looked like it had actually started life intended to be a mk2!

Ah, the ex John Miles minty Three point 1. It's one of my faves. Superb road car set up with all the right bits, must be fantastic to drive.

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Motoring Which was different to other magazines of the day in that they bought all the cars they reviewed anonymously. They are pure consumer reports and the magazine contained no advertising, therefore scarily they are much more representative of what the unfortunate public had foisted on them .

The road tests in normal magazines ,even the 'longtermers' would have been carefully* prepared , which if you read some of the problems ,say, Autocar or Motor had with test cars , is even more worrying at the lax standards of mNufacturers and importers.

 

When this test was conducted the FD was at the end of its life and the Mark3 had just been launched, surprising that the VX4/90 stood up so well. Pity BL/BMC didn't have a representative in the test, wasn't the Wolesley 16/60 still available in 1971?

Interesting info there on Motoring Which, thx. I like the layout and style of their roadtest article. Must check out some more.

 

Nearest representative from British Leyshite probably the Marina 1800TC 4 door. A schoolmate of mine went into the marines and he actually had a Marina koop, the beige banana. Used to get the piss ripped out of him when he was at home, look, here comes a marineinaMarina. Real mature stuff. Told me recently he thought we were a right bunch of tossers at the time.

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The motoring press didn't treat the cars gently.

 

I owned this actual Cappa a long time ago. Road tested by Hot Car August or Sept or Oct 1982. (Anyone have a copy of the article to scan?).

 

IMG_20160521_174414_zpsso8bolaz_edit_146

 

I believe it was the October 1981 issue. I didn't know that from memory, just wandered out to the shed and found that I don't have that particular issue but it's listed in the 'next month' section of September '81.

 

One for sale on eBay right now: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HOT-CAR-DAVID-VIZZARD-Oct-1981-vol-14-7-/220841134096

 

 

Motoring Which was different to other magazines of the day in that they bought all the cars they reviewed anonymously. They are pure consumer reports and the magazine contained no advertising, therefore scarily they are much more representative of what the unfortunate public had foisted on them .

The road tests in normal magazines ,even the 'longtermers' would have been carefully* prepared , which if you read some of the problems ,say, Autocar or Motor had with test cars , is even more worrying at the lax standards of mNufacturers and importers.

 

When this test was conducted the FD was at the end of its life and the Mark3 had just been launched, surprising that the VX4/90 stood up so well. Pity BL/BMC didn't have a representative in the test, wasn't the Wolesley 16/60 still available in 1971?

 

Wasn't that BL's problem back then, that they never really had a true Cortina competitor?

 

Courtesy of Baz (formerly of this parish, back in the early days) I have a load of bound issues of Motoring Which?. I think his uncle used to work for the magazine. It looks to have been published on a quarterly basis and it would appear I have everything from 1970 to mid-1982. Frustratingly, they always blank out the registration plates (apart from the some background cars), but there are some quite diverse tests. In the January 1970 issue for example they compare Maxi, Capri 1600 L, Datsun 1600, Saab 96, Singer Gazelle and VW 1600 T on the basis they were all about £1000. Or how about a new vs. used test, with Rover 2000 TC, Sunbeam Rapier H120 and Audi 100 LS against Daimler V8-250, Aston Martin DB5 and Bentley S1, all available for £1500-1800? A random quote from the latter "The DB5 managed 135mph before its engine started to seize up". It seems the Rover suffered similarly (watch out Trigger!). Certainly some scannable content, perhaps something for the winter?

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The motoring press didn't treat the cars gently.

 

I owned this actual Cappa a long time ago. Road tested by Hot Car August or Sept or Oct 1982. (Anyone have a copy of the article to scan?).

Unbelievable now but I sold it in 1994 for £160 still with some mot with solid body and not a lot wrong with it. Tired and used and abused every day of it's life from day one but a very enjoyable car to have.

Except when the noisy standard diff siezed solid and locked up in the middle of the main road through town, blocking the road for an hour till a tow truck arrived to lift the Cappas arse off the road.

£160 for an early 4 speeder 2.8i with a replacement (used) lsd fitted FFS.

 

Edit, a VERY MUCH used lsd.

 

Edit again, what makes it even more annoying now is that Tickford used it's brother car BHK 573X as a turbo development car. There's a pic of this one on tnet somewhere. Ex press Fords now making lots of pennies.

 

Should have stored the old warhorse away for 20yrs but at the time had a new toy to play with.

A660 ESS, a lovely Henna red manual e28 528i. Yum.

Life was good. Time to go chasing Vitesses.

 

 

 

 

IMG_20160521_174414_zpsso8bolaz_edit_146

I turned down VVW8W for £1000 back in 1992.

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Christ, look at all the faults the cars were delivered with! Not everything was better in the old days...

 

It shows how easy it was for the Japanese to rock up and eat the indigenous manufacturer's lunches.

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The Mark 3 Cortina wasn't very good really. The suspension never really worked very well and the 1600E was (is) a superior machine.  Even by 1972 standards it was piss poor - look what Alfa were achieving with coil spring suspension in comparison. It was simple and easy to work on, and stylish too. But I can still feel the rear axle hopping about as well as the weird steering geometry and chronic understeer. Ford destroyed the entire press fleet after the launch because the build quality was so bad - they used the Dagenham strike to iron out the worst of the faults.

 

I'd have the FD Victor every time, not perfect by any means but it at least had some original thinking behind it.

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A very rare 2000GXL XLR R.

 

This one was unusual in that it was Jade green, a late 60s colour sometimes seen on 1600Es.img20160903_124719_zpsln4xagx0.jpg

Did that really have all those lamps on from the factory?

 

That must be ace for "oi, turn yer lights down mate' 'ffs turn your lights down' you fucking prick *flick* have that your bastard' in the dark...

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No such thing as that spec on a cortina.

 

XlR & plain R packs were part of the pre-facelift mk1 Capri options list.

 

Those extra spots will have been added by someone.

Paint colours sometimes overlapped model changes, so jade green was possible but it was probably Onyx grèen.

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Just amazing to see the faults those cars were delivered with.  Apart from the people at the factory not caring much, didn't the dealer do any kind of PDI back in those days or was it just a matter of rocking up in a brown suit with a kipper tie and taking the poor punter's cash?

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