Jump to content
Supernaut

The Bavarian Misery Wagon [1995 BMW 316i]

Recommended Posts

If it says bushes it must mean the rear "lollipop" bushes, these can be done in situ with some lube and brute force.

 

From my e30 days ISTR that it's difficult to get the outer balljoint split without damaging the dust boot so that's why I would do the bushes on the car.

The outer balljoints are ok if you go for either the "2 hammers" method or a balljoint splitter that pushes down.

 

fork splitters are what mullers the boots:)

 

rear bushes can indeed be done on the car- a junior hacksaw is useful for getting the metal parts of the old bush off the arm.

 

Ebay had new bushes already pressed into the lollipops for peanuts-so do that rather than fit new bushes to existing lollipops

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheapness! Good!

 

However, neither of us have any previous experience of old BMWs, so a more detailed explanation would be appreciated. :D

If just changing the rear bushes:

 

jack car at front wheel and remove wheel.

 

locate 2x bolts that hold the lollipop on and remove.

 

tap bush off, fit new bush tighten bolts

 

some pics on my blog here (was doing it on an e30)

https://fuguttycars.wordpress.com/2015/07/27/like-a-hole-in-the-head-pt-1/

 

bushes you need are

 

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.view&id=160882412145&alt=web

 

its all fairly straight forward stuff:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say it's those. If I kick the front driver's side wheel from the front, it moves back visibly, then bounces back into place.

 

They don't look too hard to do. If I need to, I can go out to the parents' farm again, as Fathernaut has lots of big crowbars and hammers and a nice big shed to work in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say it's those. If I kick the front driver's side wheel from the front, it moves back visibly, then bounces back into place.

 

They don't look too hard to do. If I need to, I can go out to the parents' farm again, as Fathernaut has lots of big crowbars and hammers and a nice big shed to work in.

Well if you get stuck, drop a post on here and we'll help if we can.

 

fyi don't buy cheap bushes- get the ones I linked- with these its buy cheap change twice.

 

have a looka t the outer balljoint before ordering anything- no point fitting a new bush to a shagged arm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're not easy DIY - well the job is simple, just hard work. Getting the bushes off;

 

Cut through the rubber with a sharp knife so the lollipop bit comes off (two 18mm bolts bolt it to the chassis leg.

 

Remove the remains from the wishbone with a grinder - the quickest and easiest way.

 

Clean up the end with emery until it's nice and clean.

 

Clamp the lollipop in a vice and with a hammer and thin chisel, beast the old bush out - I always use a hacksaw inside the lollipop and cut through the steel sleeve.

 

Clean up the lollipop with emery until it's super clean.

 

Now use the vice to squeeze the new one in. Use WD40, align the arrows on the bush with the one on the lollipop but be aware that the bush will press into the lollipop from one side only - you will notice more of an internal chamfer on one side.

 

Refit the bush with WD40 as this dries out quickly - washing up liquid often doesn't. It's bloody hard work but get it started by hand and then use a big copper /hide mallet and beat it on. Fit it at the right angle so it bolts on, as there isn't a hope it hell of twisting it around to fit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I wouldn't bother replacing the bush in the lollipop - what a faff. I think we use to fit Lemforder. Had one or two e46s that didn't react well to polybushes so I personally would avoid them too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The repair I did to the exhaust has undone itself between me parking it on Wednesday, then starting it on Saturday to show 17-Coffees how quiet* it was.

 

I had a look at it today, and it seems I can actually move the entire rear section of exhaust forwards and backwards a few mm just by grabbing the tail pipe, and if I look underneath I can see the join has come adrift slightly. Looks like I need to get it up on some ramps again. Bugger.

 

Oh yes, I have those Meyle lollipops now, they arrived in the post today. Not sure when we'll get round to fitting them though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny thing is, I actually know the owner of that E34.

 

A small update on the exhaust issue:

As we have said, the ECP's exhaust fits* exactly as it should, meaning there is still a slight blowing of the exhaust. Managed to nearly sort it the other day...

29684233601_af685e54bc_z.jpg

That'll fix it... by C C, on Flickr

 

Near enough a full tube of exhaust paste that is normally used on HGV exhaust's, and the thing still bloody blows...

Next stop will likely be just to weld the pipes together and be done with it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We were bored last night so went out for a drive.

 

I also realised I really should use a tripod when taking photos in low light conditions.

 

Fuck it, have some photos anyway.

 

post-19977-0-22235300-1474797190_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-57269500-1474797251_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-95698100-1474797321_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-75753300-1474797379_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-65312900-1474797437_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-20349500-1474797504_thumb.jpg

 

post-19977-0-71046300-1474797558_thumb.jpg

 

We still haven't got round to doing the wishbone bushes either. The new ones are just rattling around in the boot, along with some oil, a spare tail light unit, and a pair of ramps.

 

In other news, you may have noticed from the photos that Mr Coffees now has his Abarth back after the front end got dented by Bambi. To say he's very happy to have it back is an understatement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the wishbone bushes on by having a cup of tea then coming back to them refreshed and with more energy to twat them harder with the hammer, then took it for a test drive to go and pick up a chippy tea from the local chipper (which is 8 miles from my parents' farm). Just back in Aberdeen now. It drives much better, I wonder why...!

 

post-19977-0-73998000-1478379244_thumb.jpg

 

 

Also, driving a shonky car on Guy Fawkes' is terrifying. All those burning smells and pops and bangs make me really paranoid about the car!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exhaust advice needed:

 

We've still never managed to get the ECP special tail section to seal properly with the mid-section.

 

So far, I've notched it with an angle grinder, put loads of gun gum in there and compressed it on with a tightly-fitted exhaust clamp. The bloody thing still blows slightly.

 

I've recently bought an exhaust bandage for it, and I'm wondering if this would help if I were to put it round the join then put the clamp back on over the top. I guess it's worth a shot, but I can't really do it on the street as it looks a bit fiddly, so it may get done next time I'm at the parents' farm. Would this be worth a shot? Any other bright ideas, short of sleeving another bit of exhaust over the whole lot and welding it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came up with this for pressing in the lollipop bushes. Yes I am a serial bmw fiddler.

 

DSC00408.jpg

DSC00405.jpg

 

If you need to do the rear trailing arm bushes  have a look here http://s399.photobucket.com/user/hybridrrs/318is/story

 

 

can't help with the exhaust mine have always had 2 flanges and an olive you clamp in between.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this one had two flanges, but the one on the old section was cracked, and the one on the ECP special was too small to go over the flared end of the pipe!

 

Got the wishbone bushes on with a good dose of rubber and nylon lubricant and using a large socket as a drift to bash them on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fuck me, the lollipops are quite simple - WD40 on both bits and with the wishbones fitted, push with all your might whilst twisting. Wishbones off - WD40 and a nice heavy lump hammer with a block of wood. 

 

Don't use washing up liquid or rubber lubricant, as it won't dry out (like WD40 does)...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

then took it for a test drive to go and pick up a chippy tea from the local chipper (which is 8 miles from my parents' farm).

 

Which chipper is that? I've only managed to find one takeaway in the Aberdeen area that isn't dreadful and it would be good to find another one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fuck me, the lollipops are quite simple - WD40 on both bits and with the wishbones fitted, push with all your might whilst twisting. Wishbones off - WD40 and a nice heavy lump hammer with a block of wood. 

 

Don't use washing up liquid or rubber lubricant, as it won't dry out (like WD40 does)...........

 

Seriously, use KY, it's water soluble, doesn't harm rubber (like WD40 does) and it dries out.

 

Recall going to buy a tube of it to refit the rubber mounted drive shaft bearing holders into the torque tube on a mates 928. (928 has front engine rear gearbox connected with a 4" diameter tube inside which a 1" diameter drive shaft spins suppported by three bearings in steel holders with a rubber ring around the outside to reduce NVH. replacement of the bearings means sliding the bearing holders about 4' down the tube). Two middle aged blokes buying a large tube of KY raised an eyebrow or two in the discount pharmacy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FAIL!

 

Reason(s) for failure
Exhaust has a major leak of exhaust gases Rear section join (7.1.2)
Exhaust emissions Lambda reading after 2nd fast idle outside specified limits (7.3.D.3)
nearside rear inner Brake pipe excessively corroded union to hose (3.6.B.2c)
offside rear inner Brake pipe excessively corroded union to hose (3.6.B.2c)

 

 

Been quoted just £205 to sort it. Hmm. Took it home for now, pending input from 17-Coffees.
 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 is possibly causing 2. Either that or it wasn't hot enough.

 

The rear end brake pipes are a bit of a pain on these, £205 isn't a terrible quote if it includes a new exhaust section.

 

I would see if anyone local has a brake pipe flaring tool to lend you, if so its probably about 50 quid all in DIY.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Zelandeth
      Well I've been meaning to sign up here in forever, but kept forgetting. Thanks to someone over on another forum I frequent poking me about it recently the subject was forced back into my very brief attention span for long enough to get me to act on the instruction.

      I figure that my little varied fleet might bring you lot some amusement...

      So...we've got:

      1993 Lada Riva 1.5E Estate (now fuel injected, as I reckon the later cars should have been from the factory...).
      1989 Saab 900i Automatic.
      1987 Skoda 120LX 21st Anniversary Special Edition.
      1985 Sinclair C5.
      2009 Peugeot 107 Verve.

      Now getting the photos together has taken me far longer than I'd expected...so you're gonna get a couple of photos of each car for now, and I'll come back with some more information tomorrow when I've got a bit more time...

      Firstly...The Lada. Before anyone asks - in response to the single question I get asked about this car: No, it is not for sale. Took me 13 years and my father's inheritance to find the thing.


      Yes, it's got the usual rusty wings...Hoping that will be resolved in the next couple of months.

       






      Next, a proper old Saab. One of the very last 8 valve cars apparently, and all the better for it. I've driven two 16v autos and they were horrible - the auto box works sooooo much better with the torque curve of the 8 valve engine. Just wish it had an overdrive for motorway cruising...









      Next up a *real* Skoda...back when they put the engine where it belongs, right out the back. In the best possible colour of course...eye-searingly bright orange.







      Seat covers have been added since that photo was taken as it suffers from the usual rotting seat cloth problem that affects virtually all Estelles.

      Then we have possibly the world's scruffiest Sinclair C5...



      Realised when looking for this that I really need to get some more photos of the thing...I use it often enough after all! We have a dog who's half husky, so this is a really good way of getting him some exercise.

      Finally - again, I really need to take more photos of - we have the little Pug 107.



      Included for the sake of variety even if it's a bit mainstream! First (and probably to be the only) new car I've bought, and has been a cracking little motor and has asked for very little in return for putting up with nearly three years of Oxford-Milton Keynes commuter traffic, before finally escaping that fate when my housemate moved to a new job. Now it doesn't do many miles and is my default car for "when I've managed to break everything else."

      I'll fill in some more details tomorrow - I warn you though that I do tend to ramble...
    • By Tickman
      First some background:
      I was brought up with no car interest, a car was transport and nothing more which resulted in a selection of poor cheap cars being the cars of my youth.
       
      Fast forward many years (just over 9 years ago) and I have a wonderful* Vauxhall Vectra estate to carry us about. Unfortunately it is crap and throws fault codes at us with nothing being there when it is checked (even at Vauxhall)
       
      As Mrs T is the main pilot of this chariot with the two little miss T's on board, it has to go.
      The hunt is on for the new steed to safely and comfortably carry the family around. I have a company car at the time so big journeys are not an issue.
       
      ebay is my weapon of choice to find the new family car. It has to be good value cheap for no other reason than I am tight.
       
      Weeks of research with lots of cars that are too expensive and too far away for easy collection end up in my watch list.
      Finally a possible is spotted in Fife. I go and have a look and find a poor looking but solid car. One previous owner and lots of history.
       
      The auction was to end on the Saturday at midday, we were going to be out! I decided on how much I was willing to gamble on it and on the Saturday morning I put in my max bid but straight away it went to my max bid, I was winning but it had three hours to go with no room for me to go up! We went out anyway.
       
      I spent the next three hours kicking myself for not bidding more while we were out as it was the first car I had seen that fitted my criteria. Fate was in charge.
       
      On returning home I go straight on ebay to find 'Congratulations.............'
      For the grand total of £500 I had just won this fine vehicle!
       

       
      It has 5 months MOT and after fitting seat belts in the rear for the girls car seats it is pushed into daily service.
      My gamble and subsequent use results in a perfectly reliable car that actually does what it is supposed to do.
       
      Even more importantly Mrs T loves it so a win all round.
       
      All my cars have names (most are earned over a bit of time) and this one is called 'Gwendolen' ( G reg car and from Wales originally. I hate the name but I am not going to argue)
       
      That sums up part one, more will be along later (probably much later)
    • By Floatylight
      Will be on the road shortly, right after fud has been consumed..
       
      Sent from my Moto G (5) using Tapatalk
    • By TripleRich
      Hi all, new to the forum.  Thought you might be interested in what I've got myself into
      I'd been after my first classic car for a while.  If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested.  Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things.  Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap.  The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it.
      So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it.

      It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again.
      Pros
      It's right up my street.  Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm.
      It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim.
      It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock).
      It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over.
      It was cheap.
      Cons
      Most of the front end has been cut off.
      Most of the body structure is quite rotten.
      It's going to take me ages.
      I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there.  So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it.  I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days.
      Cheers 
×
×
  • Create New...