Jump to content
captain_70s

Rusty Triumphs in Scotland - Pistons out - 07/09/19

Recommended Posts

Episode 206 of "why I hate my life and smell like oil".

1175573165_DSC_5914(Copy).thumb.JPG.c2b5e86acc4e2f7affa51263fb297115.JPG

374202185_DSC_5915(Copy).thumb.JPG.e6ca7e751478775495a8f5dba26384e4.JPG

441689269_DSC_5917(Copy).thumb.JPG.14ec703e044d56d1f19445c9bd526f55.JPG

1175650942_DSC_5918(Copy).thumb.JPG.9141ee8368782907b0adbd97265185d0.JPG

870471438_DSC_5921(Copy).thumb.JPG.821e209a741a6c43e809bf78d6d5b585.JPG

435295792_DSC_5922(Copy).thumb.JPG.c7bec1416d82c200d482899f9883fcbd.JPG

244759339_DSC_5924(Copy).thumb.JPG.88f15a0007a6bcfaedf946dac21b0f21.JPG

1535013632_DSC_5925(Copy).thumb.JPG.8f80712c6f2dda6799632db5d3a47a44.JPG

1216162446_DSC_5926(Copy).thumb.JPG.de3e5e776d2d756cf01fdf01d9331f1b.JPG

1095197218_DSC_5928(Copy).thumb.JPG.bc1afa03d35eb36d0d179dea12008887.JPG

2046771188_DSC_5929(Copy).thumb.JPG.6f88dbf0bdba92cf608c4f2dfb092409.JPG

I took the sump off engine no.1 and pulled a piston. Nothing looks horrendously fucky. 

People who've pulled an engine apart before feel free to comment and let me know otherwise. Regardless, I've run out of money big time, so if it'll run it'll be going in the car largely as is...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bores look pretty good, a few very light vertical scores possibly caused by the ring gap, but still plenty of what appears to be honing marks. Inspect the piston rings for signs that they might go bad - sharp edges and cracks - and try and see if there is any slop in the small end. The bottom end bearings look useable as well for a good few miles yet, so I'd whack that bottom end back together, but make sure the bearing faces around the crank have some viscous lubricant on them, I know you have no money but a smoll bottle of engine assembly lube can be had for about a fiver and will prevent those shells getting knackered quickly - a nearby shiter may have some you can borrow or a spare workbench to do some of these jobs on.

Top end, personally I'd use the head that came with this disassembled engine; besides being original to it and matching the block etc for any wear points, I don't think the coolant passages in it are anything to worry about. Lap valves in and keep the double springs as from what I can gather these Triumph OHV engines in twin carb form can suffer from valve bounce, it's a bit belt & braces for a single carb but again it's keeping the head as it was intended to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

69974534_2699990446691554_5272385811143196672_n.thumb.jpg.d5ff6932addc4f8e9c1de76740eff385.jpg

Super.

70486814_2386586498090909_2241564721935286272_n.thumb.jpg.53f2bed5b8b66bd1c8719a9893764d08.jpg

That'll roll well...

70860223_2409653502657448_5163765267888603136_n.thumb.jpg.6dcde133119a3afcfa0abc9455f207a0.jpg

Triumph aiding brethren with tyre pumping action.

70251917_1104073803315992_1616385472693534720_n.thumb.jpg.645a617052593f05adf63924e5ec7221.jpg

Dropping water ballast for additional lift. (No, that isn't a drain hole, yes that it underneath the petrol tank.)

70240172_905822053118179_4430651669432238080_n.thumb.jpg.f2ff70676d3537c5b287f7b1274d123b.jpg

These cars are now 40ft further down the road. You don't get footage of the Acclaim towing it backwards on to the street with Girlfriend_70's steering or the Eastern European chaps helping to push it along the road because I'd blocked the whole street and was developing a crowd of onlookers so was in a rush...

70134787_772656603192246_8837990703058386944_n.thumb.jpg.0e122879a0f0e21f6585388b1b533930.jpg

I some worm's home. As soon as the car was moved a disgustingly grotty Corsa took it's place.

The flat is also a disaster, with car parts featuring in nearly ever room.

70399680_698582833952640_3348355653558075392_n.thumb.jpg.03a0493ea69eef1990a097f39f2d921b.jpg

69863272_3186935818015769_6392144863940313088_n.thumb.jpg.8c9e7b29e291d7acfab1ca2b2ff4118c.jpg

69350495_906954596349351_8825803050456186880_n.thumb.jpg.f8490710eb68289bad252964d9b083d3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/2/2019 at 11:47 PM, captain_70s said:

Valves removed from both heads now.

The valves from head no.1 are pitted and the profile seems to be more curved than it should be? Seats are generally corroded.

1261179504_DSC_5902(Copy).thumb.JPG.fc2710baae91b20284adcbff924eacf6.JPG

663974195_DSC_5903(Copy).thumb.JPG.f8bf5d54f08b9317b256bc3f84053b7c.JPG

185624766_DSC_5899(Copy).thumb.JPG.5f3ca1c19ba9296bb03a7aa97cd6d678.JPG

 

Head No.0 seem to have healthier looking valves. Although given it hasn't been sat in a shed for an unknown period of time this isn't too shocking. Seats looks marginally worse.

820538332_DSC_5907(Copy).thumb.JPG.5efe1eda26dc5d402c4f13daee7500c7.JPG

1100970915_DSC_5908(Copy).thumb.JPG.16371e22a35ed1bbf71c94e08d81d4fc.JPG

1612676282_DSC_5901(Copy).thumb.JPG.6bd85e020702e61e35efac2dbb3a3643.JPG

Left is a valve from head no.0 the right is a valve from no.1

2036178067_DSC_5910(Copy).thumb.JPG.a1d6340ff54389cff04206f38e3ce7a8.JPG

At this point I'm edging toward saying "fuck it", and reusing the car's original head and valves and seeing if I can lap out the worst of the pitting. Both heads need machine work that isn't financially viable at the moment, considering whipping the head off is a 2 hour job and costs nothing but gaskets it's no hardship to do things properly at a later date when life allows me more time/money.

Bottom end/pistons/bores of engine no.1 shall be investigated later this week. Mostly out of curiosity and to do cleaning work, it's definitely the better of the two given the lack of lateral and vertical movement in the pistons...

Did I mention this whole thing is bodgery? This whole thing is bodgery.

Valves from head no.1 suggest that they've already been out for a de-coke and lap-in at least once prior to this time, head no.0 not so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Head no.1 has seen a fair chunk of work in the past. I'm not convinced it is the block's original head.

Head no.0 shows no evidence of ever being apart before. I don't think the car's original engine has ever seen any major work.

Gaskets and hose set ordered. Valve lapping stuff is at the post office collection site. Progress is occurring, albeit slowly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Living the dream*.  The pictures of your flat strewn with bits of Triumph gives me the warm fuzzies, it's a fantastic display of stubborn optimism, a truly patriotic panoply of make do and mend.

 

It's also given me reason to use the word panoply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised they use a simple piece of A4 paper, it being Glasgow. Something laminated would seem more appropriate as the chances of it not being an illegible mass of papier mache by the time anyone reads it must be 50/50 at best. 

I'd say head 0 looks marginally better but as others have said, it may be best to keep the head it came with as they know each other. It might take a bit more of lapping in of the valves but they don't have to be perfect do they. You don't need the whole 61hp (or whatever it was originally, it was 61 on the FWD 1300) at the moment anyway, just enough to make it pleasantly drivable. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7 September 2019 at 11:14 AM, captain_70s said:

Episode 206 of "why I hate my life and smell like oil".

1175573165_DSC_5914(Copy).thumb.JPG.c2b5e86acc4e2f7affa51263fb297115.JPG

374202185_DSC_5915(Copy).thumb.JPG.e6ca7e751478775495a8f5dba26384e4.JPG

441689269_DSC_5917(Copy).thumb.JPG.14ec703e044d56d1f19445c9bd526f55.JPG

1175650942_DSC_5918(Copy).thumb.JPG.9141ee8368782907b0adbd97265185d0.JPG

870471438_DSC_5921(Copy).thumb.JPG.821e209a741a6c43e809bf78d6d5b585.JPG

435295792_DSC_5922(Copy).thumb.JPG.c7bec1416d82c200d482899f9883fcbd.JPG

244759339_DSC_5924(Copy).thumb.JPG.88f15a0007a6bcfaedf946dac21b0f21.JPG

1535013632_DSC_5925(Copy).thumb.JPG.8f80712c6f2dda6799632db5d3a47a44.JPG

1216162446_DSC_5926(Copy).thumb.JPG.de3e5e776d2d756cf01fdf01d9331f1b.JPG

1095197218_DSC_5928(Copy).thumb.JPG.bc1afa03d35eb36d0d179dea12008887.JPG

2046771188_DSC_5929(Copy).thumb.JPG.6f88dbf0bdba92cf608c4f2dfb092409.JPG

I took the sump off engine no.1 and pulled a piston. Nothing looks horrendously fucky. 

People who've pulled an engine apart before feel free to comment and let me know otherwise. Regardless, I've run out of money big time, so if it'll run it'll be going in the car largely as is...

So what do the the actual bearings and crank surface look like? These pics seem to show a con rod with no shells in......and the back of the shells that are still on the crank?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something like this:

1145774459_DSC_5940(Copy).thumb.JPG.2def81d0bb8559b9edc54055bfd37136.JPG

1836651752_DSC_5941(Copy).thumb.JPG.ce33c7bdd80162cc13c3ae532d9ee082.JPG

203681764_DSC_5936(Copy).thumb.JPG.57410176f8ae6f7c44960beb449acc0d.JPG

1326428370_DSC_5935(Copy).thumb.JPG.afde7bf53f3a572d56506bcfdcff3917.JPG

Verdict - Bearings well worn, crank scored and needs to be reground. I reckon something abrasive has gotten in there somehow. Bearings don't say anything on them to suggest they are anything other than the stock size so I doubt it's been ground before.

Current plan is reassemble and drop in car, unsure if I should even bother checking the other bearings given I can't afford to replace them regardless... New bearings are a waste of money as the crank is already scored badly enough that it'll just eat through them, I can't afford a regrind, or the bearings, or food. There is zero noticeable vertical play in either the big or small ends so I reckon the engine will go without catastrophic failure. In real terms the car only needs to do one round trip for welding of about 100 miles and can then be retired for the occasional plod around town locally to stop it from seizing up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Save yourself the effort! Putting those shells back in on that crank will result in no oil pressure and a wrecked engine. The chances of completing 100 miles are virtually none, especially as it has been apart so will need to re-bed in, taking off more metal. If you cannot afford to do it now, either lay it up until you can or, sad as it is, sell it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Saabnut said:

Save yourself the effort! Putting those shells back in on that crank will result in no oil pressure and a wrecked engine. The chances of completing 100 miles are virtually none, especially as it has been apart so will need to re-bed in, taking off more metal. If you cannot afford to do it now, either lay it up until you can or, sad as it is, sell it.

Seconded.

Those bearings have had it.  There's absolutely no point in putting it back together to only have to do it again in twenty miles time.

It *might* have spotted on for a while longer like that had it not been apart, but I'd be very surprised having been disturbed if you'd ever even get the oil light out on the first start up.

Save up until you can afford at the very least a set of shells, or stick a wanted ad in the appropriate section here...enough folks work on these engines someone might have bits laying around they'd be willing to give you or sell cheap.

If it's this or food though, I agree with Saabnut.  Blind stubborn optimism can go a long way(and featured heavily in my early days of motoring), but it has its limits.  It seems to me that the time to take a step back and consider what the sensible way forward here is.  Trying to keep multiple creaky classics running with the time, space, working area and money you seem to have available just now to me seems like a recipe for a mental breakdown.  Worth noting that breathing the fumes from decades old engine oil 24/7 really isn't good for you either...

I was in the "do I fix the car or eat?" camp for a year or so back in 2007 or so...ended up selling off (read: more or less giving away) most of the fleet and buying a new car on finance.  Yes it was a fair chunk of cash every month, but it was a fixed amount every month which made budgeting a million times easier.  Plus it removed a lot of stress because I knew the damned thing would just work.  Wound up keeping it a couple of months shy of ten years too...Pug 107s are good little cars.

I know you must be fed up of the "if I were you" posts so I'm not going to rattle on any more.  Frankly astonished with what you've achieved and reckon you deserve a round of applause for it.  Would just hate to see you go to all the effort of reassembling and refitting that engine only for it to go bang ten miles down the road...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

would agree with that, it is a hobby and fine when it isnt costing a lot of cash but doing a quarter job on a engine wont get you far, new shells are a must... cut your losses or at least see if a friendly shiter (sorry cant help) has yard space that you can put it in and tarp it until you have cash... We still have a car that has been off the road for 7 years, getting bits done as and when but long term project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My issue with fitting shells is that they'll be sacrificial given the scoring on the crank. If I'm doing the shells I'd be as well getting that reground and gaining them some longevity. I love half arsing things as much as the next man but even I have my limits.

Of course once that junction is reached you're into proper rebuild territory and the game of "if I'm doing X I really should do Y" begins. After work tonight I'll pull all the pistons and get the crank out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My numbering convention is as such:

Engine No.0 - the Dolly's original factory engine. Blown up bottom end.

Engine no.1 - the mk4 Spitfire engine residing in my bedroom. Now found to need bottom end work.

Engine no.2 - a 1300fwd engine over near Chesterfield with @Jikovron

Engine no.B - a Herald 12/50 engine which lives in the basement...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I've seen a close up of the shells and crank the difference in what you can see is night and day, which is a shame as the rest of the engine looks useable. Just to get the car mobile it will be fine reassembling as is, but it really won't last long; I'd guess 1000 miles tops in the current state.

Bottom end shells and thrust washers aren't as expensive as I would have expected - depending on part number - around £75-100 for the total bottom end from Rimmers but that doesn't include any regrind costs of the crank journals.

What sort of condition is that Herald engine in?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herald engine is a complete unknown. The bloke who gave it to me did get it to turn slightly with considerable effort via the flywheel. But he was fucking huge and lifted the whole thing on to a sack truck himself...

There is also very little info as to whether it's possible to get it to mate to a Dolly gearbox as nobody has ever been daft enough to retrograde one...

I'll be taking some measurements of the crank when it comes out to compare to all my available Triumph OHV units.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just putting this out there and no this not the "right" thing to do but given the location and financial situation, to just get it mobile.

Could you take the not good bearings from no1 as they are only going in the bin and put them into no0 replacing the fooked ones. Meaning you can leave the bottom end in the car. 

Basically fling together an engine that's made out of the would be scrap / spares costing as little as possible 're using as much as possible.  Enough for the thing to move under it's own power. It'll be a short lived clucky bag of bollocks admitedly but the car being able to move and be complete may stop curtain twitchers complaining over the winter period when everyone becomes a miserable bastard anyway.

Then you can keep the best head, get the crank ground and the no2 bottom end bored out etc etc and recon any other bits  as and when funds are avalible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sort of echoing the above and being a serial Triumph bodger this is what I found last time I took mine apart. I was getting a small misfire at low revs but it still went well once you were up and running. I found no 3 cylinder had much less compression than the others. This might be why. IMAG0166.thumb.jpg.9b4aad7950ec8d575a93519e0a6cc1fc.jpg

But it wasn't just no3. After pulling all the pistons out I was left with these. IMAG0167.thumb.jpg.6e110f8498187d97296520c28ab9dcf2.jpg

The top of no3 piston and cylinder both had damage at the top IMAG0174.thumb.jpg.47ee67a6897a5af89b2b13ab41216684.jpgIMAG0171.thumb.jpg.9c863e3daf1baa0a93e1ab62d3b2f8a8.jpg

But as it was above the piston ring line it didn't matter. 

I ended up with a rebore and new plus 30 pistons but even with all the broken rings the engine was still running quite happily once you wound it up a bit. 

I know it's a different problem to yours but these engines are as basic as they come and I'd be tempted to reassemble no 1 engine and bung it in just to get it running until you can afford a rebuild or find something better. These engines are so easy to remove I don't think you've got much to lose except a few hours of your time if it has to come straight out again. The 1300 engine will be a lot more forgiving of worn bearings than the 1500 as its shorter stroke so less uppy downy forces. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, not entirely unrelated, this is what OMGHGF looks like on a Triumph 1300. 

IMG_20190911_164556.thumb.jpg.3c45b7df7fb44b7f46f4dcaafeb93114.jpg

Not the same issues as yours but it had to be recovered home. This was 1994 but I have just found this picture whilst looking for something entirely different. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were skint and not too bothered about longevity, I'd put new standard shells in the main and big end bearings of your existing engine and put the whole lot back together. Hard to tell without running a finger nail across it, but that crank doesn't look that bad to me - there's a chance it'll work, whereas you know the existing bearings are shagged.

New mains and be's look to cost less that £50 total from James Paddock, or am I missing something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Yoss said:

By the way, not entirely unrelated, this is what OMGHGF looks like on a Triumph 1300. 

I OMGHGF'd the Dolly once. The cloud of steam from the exhaust blocked the whole street...

Here is the oil pump:

1065458336_DSC_5949(Copy).thumb.JPG.de100fc606e90a012c007c5ca33d70a3.JPG

982620395_DSC_5950(Copy).thumb.JPG.b4bd3803e4a347fb2a9e231c9aacaeca.JPG

 

Here are 1/2 the mains. The rest are behind the crank which is still in the engine currently.

790485459_DSC_5951(Copy).thumb.JPG.6d22f9b9e6f0b4bd18483fb4cc821fc0.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suggests #2 spent a good while not firing (or not firing well) and the thing was run mostly on 3. Do the rings rotate in their grooves on all the pistons? What does #2 bore look like compared to the rest? Could have been something as simple as a bad spark plug too.

Your camera focused on the wrong bit of the main bearings but the right-hand one looks pretty fugly. Do you have a set of feeler gauges? The oil pump looks pretty scored but I've seen worse; with a straight edge the manual should state the up/down clearance (the important measurement) between the rotor, lobes and end of the casing.

 

I'd say yes,it'd run. Wouldn't want to say for how far but if it's nursed along it would probably make it. I think your main killer there would be mega low oil pressure once it warms up- if you don't care and just need it to get there then whang it back together, lap the valves in hard and stick the thickest treacle oil you can find in the sump and hope for the best, keep the throttle pressed as lightly as possible and the revs low.

 

--Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Fumbler
      To mark the genesis of my fleet project thread I here present my new car: a 1997 Nissan Micra Shape-


      It really looks that good. There is a reason for this: its previous owner was an old lady who loved the thing so much so she made every effort to keep it in good shape. It originally came from Fleet in the GU postcode which suggests to me it was bought by the present dealer at auction, hence arriving down here in Kent. Before seeing the car I checked its MOT history and its only fails were thanks to broken stoplights, which shows me that it was very well cared for. I suppose an example of this was that on the last MOT, an advisory was a corroded rear silencer. The silencer on the car when I saw it was new. Methinks the lady wanted to keep it as good as possible. It was kept in a garage and so all the bumpers and black trim are very black and the tyres are in very good condition. Spare never used! Also included a free Dettol first aid kit from 1997.
      This car has 15000 genuine miles on the clock. We clocked over 15000 during the test drive! The lady owner really only trundled around her village in it and the MOT shows that it only did some meagre miles between tests. This, of course, came at a price. We saw a cherry red Micra from 2002 at the same dealer. Paint was shoddy and when they washed it the boot had massive sections of bare metal and it wasn't very happy. This car, however, is in fabulous condition and there was no contest between the two cars- it really is that good, inside and out. Immaculate interior, driver's airbag, cassette player... all there and all functioning (apart from cassette thanks to new battery and failed display). This meant that I bought it for £1600, £100 over what was my uppermost limit, but I knew I wouldn't see another like this that was in as good shape for a fair while. It was priced very ambitiously, at £1990, so I'm content in the fact I managed to slash a few hundred off the price. There wasn't that much paperwork though. All the dealership received was the logbook with 3 service stamps from 1998, 1999 and 2000, the radio key pass, a National Trust sticker, and the original paperwork holder. I suspect the old lady died and had her car auctioned, and the massive file of paperwork is now someone's egg carton, along will everything else she owned.

      As always, this car isn't exactly in showroom condition. While the inside is great and the floor is solid, and the underseal is in great shape, the not undersealed parts need a small looking at. Mainly the rear of the driver's side sill. It's really the only bubbling on the car. I suspect a well aimed stonechip managed to fester over the wintery salted roads, making it rust even more. It's around the size of a 5p piece, and will give me the opportunity to spray the insides of the sill with some chain oil to prevent any further corrosion. Behind the fuel tank there are a few rusty joints- places where the spraygun cannot get paint onto- which some Vactan and Dynax should put to rights. Alternator belt looks original because of the cracking and Nissan badges and will need doing soon as well as the front plate. As much as I like the 90's font and original dealer surround, the dishevelled R and general water ingress is a persistant MOT advisory. It could be the MOT station being strict (and most likely is considering there's a Saxo down the road with far worse blackening), however for the sake of peace of mind and all that, I'll get a new one made. The rear has already been replaced indicating this has happened before.
      All in all, I think this is a nice plucky motor. I'll have it by the end of the week; just got to sort out tax, insurance, and it's going to have an MOT. As part of the deal it's getting the MOT and an oil and filter change which will be something ticked off the list. It has some love scratches and chips here and there, but it drives well, is stiff and controllable, and should make out to be a nice summer project!
    • By Zelandeth
      Well I've been meaning to sign up here in forever, but kept forgetting. Thanks to someone over on another forum I frequent poking me about it recently the subject was forced back into my very brief attention span for long enough to get me to act on the instruction.

      I figure that my little varied fleet might bring you lot some amusement...

      So...we've got:

      1993 Lada Riva 1.5E Estate (now fuel injected, as I reckon the later cars should have been from the factory...).
      1989 Saab 900i Automatic.
      1987 Skoda 120LX 21st Anniversary Special Edition.
      1985 Sinclair C5.
      2009 Peugeot 107 Verve.

      Now getting the photos together has taken me far longer than I'd expected...so you're gonna get a couple of photos of each car for now, and I'll come back with some more information tomorrow when I've got a bit more time...

      Firstly...The Lada. Before anyone asks - in response to the single question I get asked about this car: No, it is not for sale. Took me 13 years and my father's inheritance to find the thing.


      Yes, it's got the usual rusty wings...Hoping that will be resolved in the next couple of months.

       






      Next, a proper old Saab. One of the very last 8 valve cars apparently, and all the better for it. I've driven two 16v autos and they were horrible - the auto box works sooooo much better with the torque curve of the 8 valve engine. Just wish it had an overdrive for motorway cruising...









      Next up a *real* Skoda...back when they put the engine where it belongs, right out the back. In the best possible colour of course...eye-searingly bright orange.







      Seat covers have been added since that photo was taken as it suffers from the usual rotting seat cloth problem that affects virtually all Estelles.

      Then we have possibly the world's scruffiest Sinclair C5...



      Realised when looking for this that I really need to get some more photos of the thing...I use it often enough after all! We have a dog who's half husky, so this is a really good way of getting him some exercise.

      Finally - again, I really need to take more photos of - we have the little Pug 107.



      Included for the sake of variety even if it's a bit mainstream! First (and probably to be the only) new car I've bought, and has been a cracking little motor and has asked for very little in return for putting up with nearly three years of Oxford-Milton Keynes commuter traffic, before finally escaping that fate when my housemate moved to a new job. Now it doesn't do many miles and is my default car for "when I've managed to break everything else."

      I'll fill in some more details tomorrow - I warn you though that I do tend to ramble...
    • By TripleRich
      Hi all, new to the forum.  Thought you might be interested in what I've got myself into
      I'd been after my first classic car for a while.  If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested.  Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things.  Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap.  The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it.
      So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it.

      It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again.
      Pros
      It's right up my street.  Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm.
      It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim.
      It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock).
      It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over.
      It was cheap.
      Cons
      Most of the front end has been cut off.
      Most of the body structure is quite rotten.
      It's going to take me ages.
      I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there.  So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it.  I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days.
      Cheers 
    • By strangeangel
      I thought I'd start a thread for this as I'll probably end up asking all sorts of questions, given that this is my first 'proper' Citroën.
       
      So... the ground clearance lever won't go all the way to the highest setting (all others work), which is bad 'cos the book says I need it to do that in order to check the LHM level. It feels like something's seized, so I don't want to force it. Any ideas for a plan of attack would be much appreciated.
       
      Next up are the wheels. I now have a set of 205 pepperpots that have just gone off for powder coating & I need to get some tyres for them. The handbook says the car should have 165/70R14s on, the wheels came with 185/65R14 on. Any thoughts about what size I should get please? Cheers.
       
×
×
  • Create New...