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Six-cylinder

Six Cylinders Motoring Notes - I have nicked a car out of Scotland!

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This jet is tiny.  When we're talking poking through it with wire, we're talking a couple of strands from a bit of flex.  This was after it had been cooking in the ultrasonic cleaner for half an hour and had already had half a can of aerosol carb cleaner unloaded trying to shift it...so it wouldn't have been that easy to shift with whatever happened to be floating around at the FoD.

Main jet is reasonably large, the idle jet is flipping tiny though.  125 Vs 55, though I'm not sure what those numbers actually represent in terms of dimensions...or if they're just a standard used to represent carb jets...

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45 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

This jet is tiny.  When we're talking poking through it with wire, we're talking a couple of strands from a bit of flex.  This was after it had been cooking in the ultrasonic cleaner for half an hour and had already had half a can of aerosol carb cleaner unloaded trying to shift it...so it wouldn't have been that easy to shift with whatever happened to be floating around at the FoD.

Main jet is reasonably large, the idle jet is flipping tiny though.  125 Vs 55, though I'm not sure what those numbers actually represent in terms of dimensions...or if they're just a standard used to represent carb jets...

aye yeah defo did not have anything that small, I think we used a strand from REVs broken throttle cable

(I wasn't the one doing the poking, but I was floating around quite closely, as I find all this sort of stuff very interesting :) )

 

its interesting and worth noting that the Model 70 workshop manual, talks about the Weber 32ICS3 carb, where as Dolly's and every other Model 70 I have seen has a webber 32ICS10

(I dont think I have seen a Model 70 with a Solex carb, and its interesting to note that the DHSS spare parts book only has the weber listed)

this is the only bit of info I can find on what the ICS10 variant is about exactly https://puch500.eokc.at/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1151

I am in contact with a guy who knows all things Steyr puch, but the language barrier makes things hard sadly

perhaps the guys are haflinger technik knows something?

 

 

just worth keeping in mind if something does not quite match up between the workshop manual and the IRL carb

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10 minutes ago, Six-cylinder said:

@Andyrew also separated the old broken coil for its bracket for the CX and repainted the air filter assembly. Again thanks very much.

 

Are you channelling your inner Johnny Cash and getting @Andyrew to repair the CX one piece at a time? :-)

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I turned up at @Andyrew workshop with a rattling exhaust heat shield about to fall off on the black Alfa 156 so this is now in the boot! It is an Alfa so the driver door open button choose that moment to stick in so the door would not close, WD40 failed but 3 in 1 managed to get it working again.

I then tried my luck to see if he could stop the drivers knee pad falling down that covers the fuses, no is the answer, but then the combined design and manufacturing skills of Alfa Romeo never managed it either! 

IMG_20191107_145411heat shield broad.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Tadhg Tiogar said:

That looks like the usual air filter for a CX 2.5litre. Mine's equally corroded, and people keep telling me to replace it with one of those foam cone filters instead 

Thanks to Andyrew I am now very happy to keep mine original. (2400i)

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12 minutes ago, Zelandeth said:

The FoD is getting a name for itself as a home for oddball three wheeler vehicles isn't it...

 

much the dismay of @Six-cylinder probably :mrgreen:

 

it will be very interesting see what makes such a relatively old electric vehicle go etc especially on the motor speed control side of things

(ie im curious is it a big ass resistor, several speed tappings on the motor itself or some early high power silicon?)

side note you didn't happen to get a chance to drop the fuel tank out of REV did you? :) 

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Those mirrors though...

If memory serves the speed control on these old floats was done by a thing called a thyristor chopper, which switches power to the motor on and off rapidly - more efficient than a BFO resistor, although I would imagine said resistor could also double as a cab heater in the winter.

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