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Eye-catching black and whites


forddeliveryboy

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18 hours ago, Christine said:

E0FE4DED-6D02-4CFA-A7B2-F32F52B2928B-1-658x365.jpeg

 

16 hours ago, martc said:

Are you there @LightBulbFun ?

 

16 hours ago, LightBulbFun said:

 

Yeah I am, its an interesting one! I THINK thats a Barrett, specifically a lower spec Barrett M15 but I have sent the image to check with Stuart :) 

(its rather topical as I was just discussing Barretts with Stuart the other day)

spoke with Stuart about that and he thinks it might actually be a Stanley Argson Victory

20121541-5.jpg.5c3e56e907c647bfca91de1f4b9fd0d5.jpg

which im inclined to agree with, I orignially thought "Argson?" myself because of the control scheme and Surrey registration mark

but no Argson that came to mind had the bar across the rear wheel, but the Victory clearly does!

the front wheel/forks arrangement still looks different mind!

13 hours ago, Christine said:

Have you got the Bournemouth Echo one ?

 

 

282008062.jpg

no thats a new one for me! a very curious one too, it almost looks like the Model 70 is wearing white on black plates, but its clearly got 10 inch wheels! (10 inch wheels being introduced in 1975)

although it could just be a contrast thing causing a yellow retroreflective plate to appear dark, as is the case here

image.png

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image.png.fa38da96e210138a3b4c7eefeefe36b9.png

The Euston Arch, 1954. Designed by the architect Philip Hardwick and built in 1837 strictly speaking it's not an arch but a propylaeum of the Doric order. It represented not only a fitting gateway to the Midlands, but to the whole new world which the railway was to open up in the next few decades.

It was demolished in the early 1960s due to plans to upgrade and electrify the main line between Euston and Scotland as part of its Modernisation Programme.

Bob Cotton, a British Waterways engineer, acquired the material in 1962 to fill a chasm in the bed of the channel. In 1994 the historian Dan Cruickshank estimated that at least 60% of the stone from the arch was buried in the bed of the River Lea at the Prescott Channel in the East End of London. 

In 1996 Dan Cruickshank launched the Euston Arch Trust, an organisation dedicated to the rebuilding of the arch.

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1 hour ago, martc said:

image.png.fa38da96e210138a3b4c7eefeefe36b9.png

The Euston Arch, 1954. Designed by the architect Philip Hardwick and built in 1837 strictly speaking it's not an arch but a propylaeum of the Doric order. It represented not only a fitting gateway to the Midlands, but to the whole new world which the railway was to open up in the next few decades.

It was demolished in the early 1960s due to plans to upgrade and electrify the main line between Euston and Scotland as part of its Modernisation Programme.

Bob Cotton, a British Waterways engineer, acquired the material in 1962 to fill a chasm in the bed of the channel. In 1994 the historian Dan Cruickshank estimated that at least 60% of the stone from the arch was buried in the bed of the River Lea at the Prescott Channel in the East End of London. 

In 1996 Dan Cruickshank launched the Euston Arch Trust, an organisation dedicated to the rebuilding of the arch.

Thank you Jago Hazzard.😁

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12 hours ago, Metal Guru said:

Never heard of it! Where is Aberdean?

As the crow flies about 700 miles north of his place.

image.thumb.png.df03c5611c480c3d2e56a70afe9cc08b.png

 

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2 hours ago, JeeExEll said:

It looks like he's crossed the middle line of the road.  You're not supposed to do that.

He's ok, line is dotted his side*. Traffic coming the other way can only use two of the three lanes though.

** Double solid lines nowadays, in the Google Earth pic.

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image.png.d15c6ecdda542805594272be929dedf9.png

London Bridge Station - the bridge over the station approach road. The first user of the space for advertising was Eno's Fruit Salt in July 1920 . The advert was 175 feet long and believed to be the largest in existence at the time.
 
image.thumb.png.83d75ab0d7f890940e4710674804d1d1.png
 
Grim.
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On 8/6/2022 at 4:44 PM, martc said:

image.png.a03ac7bf9864f1722a50231a8a34fedf.png

MG's being loaded at Abingdon bound for Hinksey marshalling yard in Oxford. A North British Class 22 locomotive sits behind.

I think the first two are Austin-Healey Sprites II? There is no chrome trim...the Sprite was a slightly cheaper version than the MG Midget - £30 in 1961. I think they all came off the same production line.

More BMC madness - I think once Leyland took over they axed the Healey connection to save on the licencing of the name. Same with Cooper.

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41 minutes ago, lesapandre said:

I think the first two are Austin-Healey Sprites II?

Sprite Mk 3, because door handles, taller screen, and proper windows with quarter lights.  The equivalent Midget was a Mk2.     

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