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RUST


SambaS

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So to tackle a rusty car your best bet may be to strip it to a bare shell, have it acid bathed, welded and repaired then zinc phoshphated... But in the real world what's the best way to get it gone. And gone for good.

 

I will upload the pics of my XR3 garage fizz tin quick fix that looked okay for 12 months then we can all have a big debate :)

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You can't stop corrosion, it's just a fact of life. But, if you're willing to strip a car to its' shell, and spend upwards of a couple of grand getting it stripped and coated, and then coat it in oily gunk once a year forevermore, that's as near as you'll get.

I will say, there must be something in good basic preparation, 'cos the Volvo's the least rusty car I've ever owned! Near 14 year old, and it's still rock solid where it matters. Which reminds me...must sort the bonnet laquer out, before it ends up looking like my neighbour's lace doyley of a Civic.

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I am going to have to do it all again. ETA the Ford needs a LOT of work despite being t&t and in use. I rekon I'm gunna reduce it to its component parts and do a proper job, including a professional repaint by a professional (goodbye £2000) s3oirp.jpg

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That is bad for 12 months....was it cold and damp when you painted it? Stonechip is worth using on the front valance if you haven't already.

 

You need at least 2 good coats of primer, then flat and 2/3 coats of top coat...it doesn't look like there is much paint on there to me?

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I will say, there must be something in good basic preparation, 'cos the Volvo's the least rusty car I've ever owned! Near 14 year old, and it's still rock solid where it matters. Which reminds me...must sort the bonnet laquer out, before it ends up looking like my neighbour's lace doyley of a Civic.

 

The Volvo is 22 years old in May and so far shows no sign of going seriously rusty. Ditto TV2, which is 15 years old this month :D

 

As I have a real aversion to rust, the pre-FoMoCo big Volvos are perfect cars for me - even when they do start to go, they rust far slower than other cars and there is always something solid to weld new steel to if a hole does eventually appear ;)

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So you painted a 80's Ford with a couple of cans of cheap Halfords paint, left it in a damp garage for a year and your surprised that its gone rusty? :roll:

 

Following some exciting EU Law about chemical additives most consumer paints are now acrylic or water based. These are almost exclusively crap. An auto paint supplier would have been a better bet they could have sorted you out with some decent Professional paint that should at least be a bit more hard wearing.

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Well the reason I ask is because I don't want to make the same mistakes with the FSO. I'm doing most jobs to my cars for the first time - its a steep learning curve. Take this rust on my roof then. Windscreen and aerial off. Take back to metal, then what? Kurust?doqhis.jpg

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What's Hydrate 80? Should I make friends with it like I did with Hammerite's take on Waxoil?

 

http://www.bilthamber.com/pro-introduction.php?cname=Corrosion%20Removal&name=hydrate%2080

 

By all accounts its very good. I am no expert on these matters but it was recommended to me by Tim Morgan as he tested it when he worked at Practical Classics and said it was the best stuff he had ever used.

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May try that out, 1 litre for £23 see how it performs over 12 months on select parts of FSO after a decent paint. So would you not need to use any rust converter at all then. Just whack that onto bare metal then prime then paint :/ and how do you apply it, with a paint gun and compressor?

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I have a 'system' for rust prevention on heaps, but its messy and not pretty.

 

Underbody rust:

Attack with wire brush/wizzwheel on grinder. Weld up holes and then paint repair with several coats of (brush) zinc primer, treat seam with brushable seam sealer, and then paint repair with waxoyl underseal. Areas which were surface rusty daub with used engine oil/grease mix. Pour oil into sills/box sections.

 

Rusty upper bodywork:

Attack with wizzwheel on grinder. Expand any holes with cutting blade on grinder back to good metal. Weld in new metal. Treat with several coats brush primer, seam seal/fill depending on location then finish off with either a few coats of brushed on domestic gloss in a similar colour, or if I'm feeling keen brushable coach enamel in the correct colour.

 

The result is not elegant, but is most effective, and very cheap.

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Hydrate 80 is the same sort of thing a K-rust. I had bare metalled it all over and then painted it in H80. Annoyingly the H80 turned it almost exactly the same colour as it was to begin with so nobody believed I had even done any work on it.

 

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When using the stuff I bare metal H80, fine sand (if no filling is needed) prime and then paint. I have never stone chipped so cant say where that fits in but the stone chip is painted on the cars I have, so would assume it goes on, is then primed and then painted.

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Awesome, well thanks for your answer (and everybody else) its such a fundamental thing to old car ownership I can't believe its taken me until 25 years of age to get an answer. Metal-Hydrate 80-(stonechip)-prime-paint :) Then underneath theres a lot of nice products to use

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I find prepeation is the key to making long lasting repairs. I always clean any corrosion off with discs, wire wheels etc then thouroughly clean and degrease the whole area. Dry it off then apply etch primer to bare metal then at least another coat of primer then either paint or stonechip (then paint on top) depending where it is. I have done this on both my old fords and both have lasted years (over 10 now on the capri!) with no signs of failure.

I also always give the same attention to the insides of panels, usually finished off with several good coats of stonechip then either wax or underseal. All box sections, cavitys, sills, inside doors, wings/arches etc get a thourough coating with wax (dynax s50 for me!) I top this up every year or two. This bit is best done on a nice hot day so the wax is as thin as possible and then applied so it can flow into all panel seams and gaps. I do mine after the car has been sat in the sun for a few hours first, and even sometimes heat up the wax cans in a bucket of warm water first!!

 

I have always done any corrosion repairs where, corrosion should preferably be cut out and replaced, this is the best way to get rid of it but not always easy or possible. If that cant be done then grind/sand away as much as possible then use rust converters followed by good, well prepped paints/wax etc on top. The best cure for rust is always to cut it out completely if you can.

Its not always possible though without destroying sound areas trying to get access to the rusty bits. I had bits like this on my granada inside the A post and bulkhead, it was still solid but had surface rust on it that I couldnt get to, so I made good as best as possible and covered the whole area in several coats of cavity wax with an injection lance to stop it getting any worse. Sometimes this is all you can do without totally stripping and rebuilding the whole car.

 

Also always spend time prepping and painting the insides of all panels, it seems like a waste for something you wont see afterwards but it is well worth the effort for long lasting repairs. When I replaced the front wing on my granada, I bare metalled the new one, etch primed it, seam sealed all joints etc, then spent nearly two days painting on several layers of stonechip followed by underseal/wax - this was just on the inside/underneath of the panel!! After that had dried I did the outer paint finish. The wing weighed a ton afterwards but it wont rust again in a hurry!!

Its also worth stripping off that black/brown paint that new panels are sold covered in. Its usually crap paint just for protecting the metal while in transport and storage. It also often has surface rust already starting underneath it! If you leave this behind then paint over the top it will eventually come through again and rot the new panel aswell. I always strip it all back to bare metal and paint/prime it myself, the finish is much better this way and you also know it was dry,clean and rust free to begin with.

Try to do bare metal and paint work in a dry environment to avoid moisture in the air starting to rust the new/bare areas and if you have to leave it overnight or for another day always give the bare metal a light dusting in primer, just to stop any rust starting until you can finish the job proberly.

Primer is also porus so dont leave a primered panel out in the rain as the water eventually soakes through the primer and rusts the metal underneath.

 

Sorry for the long boring reply but it is well worth doing this if you want a good long lasting job done. Its not fun at all having to re-do your own work (or someone elses) a year later because it wasnt right the first time. I know cos ive done it myself and learnt the hard and expensive way!

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