Jump to content
Split_Pin

Shite in Miniature II

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, Split_Pin said:

Lovely job on the Rocket, very nice indeed.

The Discovery is part of a cheap-ass combo with a caravan or something which are for sale in The Entertainer or similar low budget toy shop. The problem is that nowadays, in the UK there isn't much choice for these sorts of outfits.

All of the manufacturers, both UK and in Europe used to make some lovely sets like the Superkings Jaguar XJ and caravan (or was it Corgi) or the Majorette Renault 18 with the caravan and the aerofoil on its roof.

You just don't see that now, except for the aforementioned cheap tosh.

the caravan and car combo set i had as a nipper was a Corgi Mercedes W114 saloon, in navy blue with the caravan with the plant pot on the back window.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, bunglebus said:

Rocket is restored.

49955468033_63b057224f_4k.jpg

Smart!

You work so fast, I barely finish anything...

The reason the Marx and Hot Wheels Eldorados have taken so long to complete is I wanted matt black hoods on them - but the paint fought me, my clumsiness took steps back and the mojo evaporated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, crad said:

20200531_162059.thumb.jpg.c9d79ce9b79a9b3696a9b40c8b50624e.jpg

two corgi rockets, although without the thingy to lower and raise the ride height

The 'thingy' was a key to allow the detaching of the chassis / wheels section.  I didn't think it let you adjust any height - that is without swapping out for a different bigger wheel chassis instead?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Volksy said:

Making tiny things look weathered worn repainted and covered in brake dust and mud is pretty difficult!

It's coming together nicely. I wish I could do rust and weathering, it'd be the perfect way to go with some of the kits I have.

Finished the Sunny Truck today:

49957485001_cf833e9f47_b.jpg

1:24 Hasegawa Nissan Sunny Truck kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

49956987698_03c1b3ac5e_b.jpg

1:24 Hasegawa Nissan Sunny Truck kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

49957484761_61e1c96365_b.jpg

1:24 Hasegawa Nissan Sunny Truck kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

49957484901_c09052ae71_b.jpg

1:24 Hasegawa Nissan Sunny Truck kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

49957769902_91ec7a8ff5_b.jpg

1:24 Hasegawa Nissan Sunny Truck kit by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

Scooter didn't quite get finished. Sunny can deliver that to the paintshop when it's dropped off the wheels for what might be my next project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, 155V6 said:

I think Richard_FM was thinking of the Corgi Juniors Aerocar,I guess it does look like a Honda Accord 

corgi-aerocar1-1.thumb.jpg.5e98f02071b7adb7acef10f03cc5a39a.jpg

Thanks for that, the car looks a bit muscle car, like a Pontiac Firebird with a smoothed out nose.

 

The disclaimer "model does not fly" is a nice touch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I've just been reading too.  One article stated it was never officially released.  Does that just mean it was not in the catalogue?

Could be fake news though.  I only believe @Datsuncog when it comes to facts.   It's the rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/16/2020 at 1:22 PM, flat4alfa said:

The Polistil L2 Porsche-Audi 917-10 Can Am in '1/32 scale'

image.thumb.png.05c0e89b26b1901eef76921e9215cd77.png

 Did you want to see the others while I'm babbling about the Can-Am Sports Car subject that impressed me so as a boy?

More Can-Am babbling, coming right up.

Polistil 1973 Ferrari 312-PB in 1/32 scale.  Although it seems nearer 1/30

For 1973 the wheel base was stretched and bodywork changed.  I could not regain its 1972 title as the Porsche [above] was too good

20200529_090859454_iOS.jpg

20200529_090910707_iOS.jpg

20200529_090922475_iOS.jpg

20200529_090935478_iOS.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hot Wheels 1971 Ferrari 312-PB in 1/28 scale

The 1972 season was a great year for Ferrari, as the 312 PB had been very reliable and very fast. It came powered by Ferrari’s (still new) flat-12 Formula 1 engine.  Even in de-tuned long-distance specification, it gave 440bhp and reliable to 12,500rpm, way beyond the reach of any competitor engine including the Cosworth DFV.  Each titanium conrod cost £1000, which is around £14,300 today.  And there were a dozen in each engine.  

The most notable achievement that year was Jacky Ickx recording what will stand for all time as the fastest ever lap of the old Spa-Francorchamps - over 163mph in a 3-litre car 48 years ago.  And, yes, that does include F1 cars.  

20200529_092823886_iOS.jpg

20200529_092906374_iOS.jpg

20200529_092831131_iOS.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, flat4alfa said:

That's what I've just been reading too.  One article stated it was never officially released.  Does that just mean it was not in the catalogue?

Could be fake news though.  I only believe @Datsuncog when it comes to facts.   It's the rules.

From last year's musings... I'm pretty unclear about the origins of this one too, but I've managed to track down nearly all the 1970s Corgi catalogues and still haven't seen this one mentioned yet.

The Bill Manzke book on Corgi Juniors reckons it was made from 1976-78, and also advises "Believed to have been intended as a tie-in to a James Bond movie, but rejected by the licence owner".

It was also  made in Hong Kong rather than GB, which further muddies the waters.

On 1/18/2019 at 11:20 AM, Datsuncog said:

Then this, which was something I ain't never seen before: a Corgi Juniors Aero Car

post-17915-0-22504900-1547809456_thumb.jpg

post-17915-0-53343800-1547809467_thumb.jpg

post-17915-0-08200200-1547809479_thumb.jpg

Hmm. I wasn't sure if it was based on some kind of prototype or what; there's a touch of Studebaker Avanti about the nose.

But a quick internet search reveals:

post-17915-0-22089600-1547809498_thumb.jpg

Well I never. That's a new one on me.

It seems that there's an implicit James Bond connection, as this set-up may be familiar to anyone who watched The Man With The Golden Gun from 1974, when Scaramanga's AMC Matador X turns into a plane...

post-17915-0-82641600-1547809781_thumb.jpg

Not sure whether Corgi couldn't land a deal with either/both the film studio or AMC to sell it as a film tie-in - though they produced plenty of official 007 merchandise both before and after this, plus had the AMC Pacer model in two scales - but it seems fans consider it within the same range of collectables.

post-17915-0-24723900-1547809763_thumb.png

I'm not sure how long this model was in the Corgi line-up; it doesn't feature in any of my few 1970s and 80s Corgi catalogues, but it did seem to last long enough to go through at least one packaging redesign.

post-17915-0-36220300-1547809515_thumb.jpg

I'm wondering if it'd be worth my while to go back for a rummage just in case the wings are also still in there...

post-17915-0-92501300-1547809774_thumb.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Datsuncog said:

From last year's musings... I'm pretty unclear about the origins of this one too, but I've managed to track down nearly all the 1970s Corgi catalogues and still haven't seen this one mentioned yet.

The Bill Manzke book on Corgi Juniors reckons it was made from 1976-78, and also advises "Believed to have been intended as a tie-in to a James Bond movie, but rejected by the licence owner".

It was also  made in Hong Kong rather than GB, which further muddies the waters.

In the film it was a AMC matador? 

I think Corgi also did the Range Rover with the open back, seem to think this was a tie in from a bond film 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, sierraman said:

In the film it was a AMC matador? 

I think Corgi also did the Range Rover with the open back, seem to think this was a tie in from a bond film 

I had the Ranger Rover from Octopussy, complete with horsebox & fold up plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, sierraman said:

In the film it was a AMC matador? 

Specifically, AMC ‘Matador Coupe’ to differentiate from the saloon and wagon body style

The actual car used in the film was one of the limited edition ’Cassini’ models built on top of the ‘Brougham Coupe’ spec.  That just meant Mr Oleg Cassini tarted-up the interior.

It still lives on today, wearing its 1977 issue UK plates.  Was at Keswick, but since auctioned off almost ten years back, it can be seen at the Dezer Collection at Miami 

It was a AMC ‘Hornet X’ in the film, clue being the stripe on the flanks that the Matador does not have.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Datsuncog said:

It was also  made in Hong Kong rather than GB, which further muddies the waters.

I read somewhere that it was a bought-in model, which would explain.  Will have to dig further

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More BX stuff...

The axles I'd added were too long, so I'd trimmed them down. I didn't want to make them too short though and the track look too narrow. So I needed to make some spacers. 

Took a 1:76 car that had seen better days... 

IMG_20200601_172216.thumb.jpg.4e755ec9e9269e74823cf7677c0253ad.jpg

The wheels were about the right size/shape

IMG_20200601_172222.thumb.jpg.bdb97ca8b44433fca57a42961ff5fd79.jpg

Drilled to suit axle

IMG_20200601_172655.thumb.jpg.b72c8302a142a6477c2e47e6621d08a0.jpg

Trimmed off enough for the spacers

IMG_20200601_174712.thumb.jpg.b18fd48e753004a6a7d84ad1894a57ba.jpg

Different widths needed for each axle

IMG_20200601_182359.thumb.jpg.7638314d703cc785e7370f75e68ce04b.jpg

On the chassis, will glue them to the back face of the wheel once I'm ready to reassemble. 

IMG_20200601_182439.thumb.jpg.911741ba33d7cba062830af20acbab50.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/3/2019 at 12:06 PM, Datsuncog said:

20190703_014744.thumb.jpg.986242ad17e6bfc93685324e125d8b5f.jpg

Dinky Toys Pontiac Trans-Am - one of the notorious Hong Kong Dinkys

I found out something I didn't know.... I do already own a Hong Kong Dinky !

Bought this Chevrolet Camaro  - oooh - thirty years ago and thought it a rough diamond, even then

image.png.3dc2808e7c8ad7afdaf969f17c64c612.png

This one doesn't have the typical 'Z28' door sticker, but some (rare?) tampo striping.   Despite being 'sister cars' in real life and also having the T-bar roof, I can see that, surprisingly, nothing is shared!   The Camaro is a two-seater; has different bonnet (hood!) casting; there are side exhaust pipes as part of the plastic base; of course different body shell.  Seems an odd way of pooling resources.

image.png.23de10c058bd9de7b04e656d01324446.png

image.png.a85c8178ad7fc10b520ba8fef8360c0f.png Cars-8.jpg

It does have an opening bonnet, although the hinge is wonkied.  But look!  It has a V6 engine - never found in the Z28 spec, which wearing those fender extensions and air spoiler should imply

image.thumb.png.7dbe084f4803dde06f80f9b94d963add.png

To an American, this is a Kidco model as Dinky was a UK-only brand.  I wonder if, to an American collector, it could be valuable?

image.png.a1b98309b98b0ca9c2d5b05884080467.png

Thought not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've fallen way behind on matters of diecast tat; one of these days I'll get around to writing up the 1:76 Plaxton Panorama collection sponsored by the excellent Mr D Cog.

For now, though, I must share a bit of an obsession that I'm trying, and failing, to kerb.

20190630_195020-01.thumb.jpeg.61214502dd0033e3db2de574036f4ee9.jpeg

Many moons ago, I chanced upon a loose Corgi 1:36 Sierra 2.3 Ghia in frustratingly fictitious racing livery at a car boot sale. It wasn't very many quid, so I had to have it, because Ford Sierra Ghia. 

Now, my dad had an early Sierra Ghia, and I still consider it one of my very favourite cars in the whole world. While it's nice to have a decent-sized model of a Sierra Ghia for the first time in my life, the fact that it's decked out in silly racing car livery began to slowly eat away at me.

What I needed, what I really needed, was one that actually reflected the spec of my dad's car (putting aside the fact that his was a 2.0 rather than a 2.3, and that Corgi elected to cast the impression of window winders into the doors, despite the Ghia having leccy efforts as standard.

EDYEB43XkAAgWHP.thumb.jpg.3bfdf27b0ae0fdcba84d9e9db05dd5e6.jpg

Anyway. At 39 years of age, I'm now allowed to spend my pocket money on anything that takes my fancy, and I knew that I just wouldn't be satisfied until I had a model of My Dad's Sierra.

So, to eBay I went. Not immediately, but over the course of several months. I wanted a blue one, boxed, and in the best condition I could find, but not at a stratospheric price.

Naturally, because "I know what I've got here", everything was stratospherically priced.

Until, one evening, a chance visit to eBay suddenly threw forth an example that didn't cost any arms, legs or less vital appendages.

20200601_175640.thumb.jpg.ee741bd8f1a63c1a5e14109aed5cc945.jpg

Complete with yellowing plastic packaging that prevents the camera from properly focussing on its target, I'm guessing that this was among the final releases for the Sierra, packaged with a strange clip-on badge sort of thing that I'm not entirely sure of the purpose of. Incidentally, my Rolls Royce Corniche would have arrived in a similar package; I still have the Rolls Royce badge, whose very existence baffled me even when I received it at age 12 or so. (Incidentally this was from Chas and Dora, our next-door neighbours, now sadly deceased. Dora would later donate her Triumph Acclaim to my mum when she learnt to drive in 1993, and that would later become my first car. Cheers, Dora).

So. I now had a blue Ford Sierra Ghia, so that's good.

Except, the blue is really a bit too dark to be properly representative of my dad's car, which was a far lighter, slightly greenier shade called Glacier Blue.

Also, this model wears the generic wheels that would grace so many others in the 1:36 lineup, including the Rolls Corniche. They're almost get-away-withable, slightly resembling as they do the wheel trims you got on a Mk 3 Escort Ghia: 

69cba8c454004d12fe7384984d784646.jpg.c96af92ff1fbcea095a30755e554b9a2.jpg

As it happens, my dad's Sierra Ghia had a set of trims that actually should have belonged to a Sierra Laser, and I reckon they're among the most apt trimz that the Sierra ever did wear. They're all curvy and smooth and perfectly in kinship with the old jellymould's flowing lines.

bb7b374e-e660-40c6-9e80-99e9c8f9b52e.jpg.c0bb4dfeb8b436e9c92d2061460ccb88.jpg

Anyway. I digress again. One thing that is quite cool about this release is the natty SIERRA number plates that it has in the appropriately spacey font that Ford used in the 80s.

20200601_175917.thumb.jpg.2fc63ecb7d8d1ae09314fedfababeaae.jpg

The 80s really were spectacular, weren't they?

 

20200601_175702.thumb.jpg.6252823e610283c6fde73c6221b93106.jpg

Looking at the above, the Sierra really does seem a bit of a poor relation compared to much of that lot, doesn't it? Consider that the Fezza 308 had its working pop-up headlights, the 325i (and Merc 190?) had its sliding sunroof, and the Bond Aston did all its gadgety things. The Peugeot 205 had a working engine, I believe.

No I don't.

Anyway, so there I was, finally possessing a 1:36 scale Corgi Ford Sierra Ghia, in almost the right colour, and with wheels that looked no less alike the ones on Dad's car than any other set that Corgi modelled. I was satisfied. 

Or was I?

Nope, of course not. While it's nice, very nice, it somehow feels NO GOOD AT ALL to represent my dads car with a model that was built and packaged long after the subject it depicts went out of production.

What I really needed was an example from the very beginning of the production run.

And now I have one.

20200601_175347.thumb.jpg.2dd1820e3dbef89643a2db88bf725024.jpg

Now, the more observant among you will notice that it very definitely isn't blue, even if you squint. But, for me, right now, that's okay; especially given the context of this incredible packaging, of which I offer the following pictures.

20200601_175357.thumb.jpg.bf562c18fa8f9dd47bc2c03556f3a195.jpg

20200601_175415.thumb.jpg.ab648f27962db10dc85fa274c84c9ef8.jpg

20200601_175438.thumb.jpg.2ea3f0e22b9d64d29626388d66eb76c6.jpg

All of this, to me, is unspeakably gorgeous. The packaging, with its proud 2.3 Sierra Ghia emblems, is just perfect. Somehow, by using the very same graphic design that actually appeared on the car itself and the publicity materials that I spent so much of my childhood poring over, lends the model a tangible connection to the car itself. This model, in this box, feels like it's an integral part of the Sierra Story.

It has immediately become one of my very favourite model cars, and its bright yellow hue gels perfectly with the orange of its promotional packaging. It's just wonderful.

Would be even better if it was light metallic blue, though....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RoadworkUK said:

I've fallen way behind on matters of diecast tat; one of these days I'll get around to writing up the 1:76 Plaxton Panorama collection sponsored by the excellent Mr D Cog.

For now, though, I must share a bit of an obsession that I'm trying, and failing, to kerb.

20190630_195020-01.thumb.jpeg.61214502dd0033e3db2de574036f4ee9.jpeg

Many moons ago, I chanced upon a loose Corgi 1:36 Sierra 2.3 Ghia in frustratingly fictitious racing livery at a car boot sale. It wasn't very many quid, so I had to have it, because Ford Sierra Ghia. 

Now, my dad had an early Sierra Ghia, and I still consider it one of my very favourite cars in the whole world. While it's nice to have a decent-sized model of a Sierra Ghia for the first time in my life, the fact that it's decked out in silly racing car livery began to slowly eat away at me.

What I needed, what I really needed, was one that actually reflected the spec of my dad's car (putting aside the fact that his was a 2.0 rather than a 2.3, and that Corgi elected to cast the impression of window winders into the doors, despite the Ghia having leccy efforts as standard.

EDYEB43XkAAgWHP.thumb.jpg.3bfdf27b0ae0fdcba84d9e9db05dd5e6.jpg

Anyway. At 39 years of age, I'm now allowed to spend my pocket money on anything that takes my fancy, and I knew that I just wouldn't be satisfied until I had a model of My Dad's Sierra.

So, to eBay I went. Not immediately, but over the course of several months. I wanted a blue one, boxed, and in the best condition I could find, but not at a stratospheric price.

Naturally, because "I know what I've got here", everything was stratospherically priced.

Until, one evening, a chance visit to eBay suddenly threw forth an example that didn't cost any arms, legs or less vital appendages.

20200601_175640.thumb.jpg.ee741bd8f1a63c1a5e14109aed5cc945.jpg

Complete with yellowing plastic packaging that prevents the camera from properly focussing on its target, I'm guessing that this was among the final releases for the Sierra, packaged with a strange clip-on badge sort of thing that I'm not entirely sure of the purpose of. Incidentally, my Rolls Royce Corniche would have arrived in a similar package; I still have the Rolls Royce badge, whose very existence baffled me even when I received it at age 12 or so. (Incidentally this was from Chas and Dora, our next-door neighbours, now sadly deceased. Dora would later donate her Triumph Acclaim to my mum when she learnt to drive in 1993, and that would later become my first car. Cheers, Dora).

So. I now had a blue Ford Sierra Ghia, so that's good.

Except, the blue is really a bit too dark to be properly representative of my dad's car, which was a far lighter, slightly greenier shade called Glacier Blue.

Also, this model wears the generic wheels that would grace so many others in the 1:36 lineup, including the Rolls Corniche. They're almost get-away-withable, slightly resembling as they do the wheel trims you got on a Mk 3 Escort Ghia: 

69cba8c454004d12fe7384984d784646.jpg.c96af92ff1fbcea095a30755e554b9a2.jpg

As it happens, my dad's Sierra Ghia had a set of trims that actually should have belonged to a Sierra Laser, and I reckon they're among the most apt trimz that the Sierra ever did wear. They're all curvy and smooth and perfectly in kinship with the old jellymould's flowing lines.

bb7b374e-e660-40c6-9e80-99e9c8f9b52e.jpg.c0bb4dfeb8b436e9c92d2061460ccb88.jpg

Anyway. I digress again. One thing that is quite cool about this release is the natty SIERRA number plates that it has in the appropriately spacey font that Ford used in the 80s.

20200601_175917.thumb.jpg.2fc63ecb7d8d1ae09314fedfababeaae.jpg

The 80s really were spectacular, weren't they?

 

20200601_175702.thumb.jpg.6252823e610283c6fde73c6221b93106.jpg

Looking at the above, the Sierra really does seem a bit of a poor relation compared to much of that lot, doesn't it? Consider that the Fezza 308 had its working pop-up headlights, the 325i (and Merc 190?) had its sliding sunroof, and the Bond Aston did all its gadgety things. The Peugeot 205 had a working engine, I believe.

No I don't.

Anyway, so there I was, finally possessing a 1:36 scale Corgi Ford Sierra Ghia, in almost the right colour, and with wheels that looked no less alike the ones on Dad's car than any other set that Corgi modelled. I was satisfied. 

Or was I?

Nope, of course not. While it's nice, very nice, it somehow feels NO GOOD AT ALL to represent my dads car with a model that was built and packaged long after the subject it depicts went out of production.

What I really needed was an example from the very beginning of the production run.

And now I have one.

20200601_175347.thumb.jpg.2dd1820e3dbef89643a2db88bf725024.jpg

Now, the more observant among you will notice that it very definitely isn't blue, even if you squint. But, for me, right now, that's okay; especially given the context of this incredible packaging, of which I offer the following pictures.

20200601_175357.thumb.jpg.bf562c18fa8f9dd47bc2c03556f3a195.jpg

20200601_175415.thumb.jpg.ab648f27962db10dc85fa274c84c9ef8.jpg

20200601_175438.thumb.jpg.2ea3f0e22b9d64d29626388d66eb76c6.jpg

All of this, to me, is unspeakably gorgeous. The packaging, with its proud 2.3 Sierra Ghia emblems, is just perfect. Somehow, by using the very same graphic design that actually appeared on the car itself and the publicity materials that I spent so much of my childhood poring over, lends the model a tangible connection to the car itself. This model, in this box, feels like it's an integral part of the Sierra Story.

It has immediately become one of my very favourite model cars, and its bright yellow hue gels perfectly with the orange of its promotional packaging. It's just wonderful.

Would be even better if it was light metallic blue, though....

I have that very same model, albeit with a slightly less good box. The script is pure 'Autoshite', if you remember the original site's 'Cafe Pan-Am'. I'm not sure the yellow isn't a fictitious colour for the Sierra which is a surprise as all their other Ford models of the time came in authentic colours. 

It's an excellent model, right down to the bands on the front seat trim and the wheel covers.

Great purchase!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Corgi Sierra came in this tatty box:

30074190265_621e82a4a2_c.jpg

Corgi Ford Sierra and Renault 11 by Spottedlaurel, on Flickr

I now have a little one that matches it, also with the original logo on the box.

I didn't have the 1:36 example when I was young, I suppose I was getting a bit too old for them back then (but now?!). Pleasingly captures the feel of the rea thing to me, except for the Subaru-esque frameless doors....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Datsuncog said:

From last year's musings... I'm pretty unclear about the origins of this one too, but I've managed to track down nearly all the 1970s Corgi catalogues and still haven't seen this one mentioned yet.

The Bill Manzke book on Corgi Juniors reckons it was made from 1976-78, and also advises "Believed to have been intended as a tie-in to a James Bond movie, but rejected by the licence owner".

It was also  made in Hong Kong rather than GB, which further muddies the waters.

Here's the Aerocar in the 1977 Collectors Catalogue:

Aerocar.thumb.jpg.ced0664f1de9705dca5d0a103ecb266a.jpg

Hidden at the back amongst the randoms in the Super range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...