Jump to content
Felly Magic

Bus Shite

Recommended Posts

Those Japanese buses all have massive displacement engines and manual gearboxes. Been on some out there, very clunky riding experience.

 

That AD I posted before reminded me of the pre-CCTV period where the driver would have a periscope and series of mirrors and lenses to keep an eye on the upper deck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Japanese buses all have massive displacement engines and manual gearboxes. Been on some out there, very clunky riding experience.

 

That AD I posted before reminded me of the pre-CCTV period where the driver would have a periscope and series of mirrors and lenses to keep an eye on the upper deck.

 

I used to get told off for peering down the periscope and into the drivers cabin  :mrgreen:

 

ahh memories LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hybrid buses are not faring (sorry for the pun) well, battery life is very short, and the batteries are proving too expensive to replace, and the Borismasters are having opening windows fitted due to the HVAC putting extra strain on the hybrid powertrain

The company I work for bought 10 hybrids in 2011 and partly due to battery replacement cost and partly due to reliability they were converted to conventional diesel power in 2016-2017. Reliability improved but they are now gutless as hell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nottingham Park and Ride (operated by the city council) has a fleet of BYD electric buses. I thought they were quite good - a bit noisy, but quick enough. Build quality seems a bit iffy, the drivers have started swerving around certain potholes that they know will twist the emergency door and set the buzzer off (they're 18 plate I think). But they did the job and were quite a brave use of full electric rather than hybrid.

 

Can't have been making a profit though as the council has just passed the P&R sites over to Nottingham City Transport as part of 2019/2020 cost savings who are bringing in some Biogas buses. The electric buses will be "saved for use elsewhere". The press release is full of fluff about how "NCC have set up a profitable scheme and now it's time to let NCT build on it" but clearly if there was money in it they'd still be running it.

 

(Edit: just remembered that two massive charging sites were built at the P&R stop we use, that doesn't look good financially if they're going to biogas! Perhaps they'll install a shitload of electric car charging points to use the infrastructure, they currently only have 4 for a 600-ish space carpark)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s strange how the hybrids have been unreliable given they are so reliable as a car.

Both Stagecoach in Sheffield and Manchester had batches of identical hybrids. The Manchester ones were far more reliable than the Sheffield ones. Sensibility they swoped them, the most reliable of Manchester's was suddenly a bag of shite in Sheffield whilst Sheffield's worse one was pretty reliable in Manchester. Difference, bfo hills in Sheffield, pretty flat in Manchester.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both Stagecoach in Sheffield and Manchester had batches of identical hybrids. The Manchester ones were far more reliable than the Sheffield ones. Sensibility they swoped them, the most reliable of Manchester's was suddenly a bag of shite in Sheffield whilst Sheffield's worse one was pretty reliable in Manchester. Difference, bfo hills in Sheffield, pretty flat in Manchester.

 

this sort of reminds me of London Transports, XF and XA trials

 

and in the end the production XF, the DMS turned out to be a bag of shite LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those Japanese buses all have massive displacement engines and manual gearboxes. Been on some out there, very clunky riding experience.

 

That AD I posted before reminded me of the pre-CCTV period where the driver would have a periscope and series of mirrors and lenses to keep an eye on the upper deck.

 

Ailsas had that.

 

There used to be a mirror at the front top right of upper deck and a slot under the window with 2 angled mirrors pointing up at it and a further couple in the drivers cab the worked like a rear view mirror periscope for the upper deck.

 

Took me longer than it should of as a kid to realise where there were so many mirrors up there haha.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this sort of reminds me of London Transports, XF and XA trials

 

and in the end the production XF, the DMS turned out to be a bag of shite LOL

 

The DMS was actually a very good bus, the problem was LT, and their "if it wasn't designed / built in London it's a bag of shite " mentality (that still applies).

 

Operators who bought them off LT got a very good bus for peanuts (apart from LT's stuipid electrical changes). I remember chatting with one local municipal operators engineer about the 'scrap' ones they had bought. "What's wrong with that one" I asked, "looks OK to me"?. "LT sold it us as parts for the working ones we bought, actually the only thing wrong is the half shaft is broken. We'll be getting one out of the stores next week".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ailsas had that.

 

There used to be a mirror at the front top right of upper deck and a slot under the window with 2 angled mirrors pointing up at it and a further couple in the drivers cab the worked like a rear view mirror periscope for the upper deck.

 

Took me longer than it should of as a kid to realise where there were so many mirrors up there haha.

First ones in Sheffield were back in the late 60's. Every so often you found one where the glass on the top deck was missing for some reason. Obviously, you didn't* drop things down there knowing it would annoy the driver when it him....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn’t Andrews buses in Sheffield run Daimler DMS?

They were ex SYPTE ones, but were part of a batch of 30 bought at short notice where Daimler could supply chassisis and MCW could fit bodies but only if they had them to LT design. Only difference externally to a DMS was the destination blind design, the entrance / exit doors were single fold and they didn't have the extra bodywork above the engine bustle.

Internally they were trimmed in SYPTE brown. One survives in preservation.

 

 

http://www.sytt.org.uk/history-of-1515

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One rough and ready scanner session later....

 

Andrews 1.jpg

Andrews 3.jpg

Andrews 4.jpg

Andrews 5.jpg

Andrews 6.jpg

Andrews 7.jpg

Andrews 8 .jpg

Andrews 10.jpg

 

And lastly, added not for the quality of shot but for the levels of chod around

 

Andrews 9.jpg

Top photo, second from left is one of the ex SYT ECW bodied Fleetlines, another rare breed, one surviving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how many GM or Mayne of Manchester have survived?

Not that many. Some of the earlier stuff survives (at least one of their Regent V) but with the modern stuff they were mostly second hand so those that still exist have been restored in their original owners colours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what the resonating cooked cow between 2 bits of bread said :)

 

I thoroughly enjoyed the video :) to quote busmansholiday, will it do smiths MPH?  :mrgreen:

 

is the reasoning for pausing between gear shifts, is to let air pressure build back up in the system or is it something else?

 

also out of curiosity if you dont mind me asking, how did insurance work out?

 

from what iv read (in this very thread I think :) ), while you can drive a 30+ year old buses on a normal licence etc, practically no one will insure you

 

or does this just fall under your "can drive other peoples "cars" 3rd party only" thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I didn't know Ian was an 'influencer'! I remember almost ten years ago on the BX Forum or maybe here when you were discussing trying to break into indy-journalism, looks like it's worked out. Top job.

 

In more boring news I think Reading have de-hybridised some of their Dennis doublet deckers as they've removed all the fancy green branding and they sound very different. In the BAE system I think it's a fairly simple job, as their hybridrive was packaged as a gearbox anyway, so kept the angle drive to the axle etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just been catching up on this thread...

 

First off: Ian. Driven like an absolute professional, perfect timing on the gear changes. While a pause IS necessary it's needs be no longer than it takes to rev match. One of the three Nationals I owned more or less demanded flat changes 'cos the exhausters in the gearbox were fucked and another slipped like a bastard if you were too quick 3rd>4th and 4th>5th.

 

 

Secondly: It is well known of my dislike of Routemasters but on the other side of that coin I absolutely adore DM and DMS Fleetlines; I've driven probably a dozen Fleetlines and the one thing that a DM/DMS does REALLY well is not drive like a Fleetline. They're a really beautiful bus to drive.

 

Thirdly: The National 2 Ian refers to in his video was one of mine back in the days when I dabbled in such things. Sadly joint ownership didn't work out (it rarely does - don't do buses, kids) but there are plenty videos of it on YouTube. Here is one of them, a drivepast with me at the helm.

 

https://youtu.be/m-Qp51rEb5I

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just been catching up on this thread...

 

First off: Ian. Driven like an absolute professional, perfect timing on the gear changes. While a pause IS necessary it's needs be no longer than it takes to rev match. One of the three Nationals I owned more or less demanded flat changes 'cos the exhausters in the gearbox were fucked and another slipped like a bastard if you were too quick 3rd>4th and 4th>5th.

 

 

Secondly: It is well known of my dislike of Routemasters but on the other side of that coin I absolutely adore DM and DMS Fleetlines; I've driven probably a dozen Fleetlines and the one thing that a DM/DMS does REALLY well is not drive like a Fleetline. They're a really beautiful bus to drive.

 

Thirdly: The National 2 Ian refers to in his video was one of mine back in the days when I dabbled in such things. Sadly joint ownership didn't work out (it rarely does - don't do buses, kids) but there are plenty videos of it on YouTube. Here is one of them, a drivepast with me at the helm.

 

https://youtu.be/m-Qp51rEb5I

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

 

 

Ooh, that is a proper noise. I rather regret not getting any drive-past footage of the one I drove. Thanks for the gear compliments. It was a real head-messer with the right-hand change, and having to take time and driving a friggin' bus AND trying to record a video. I don't think I'd anticipated just how tricky all of that would be, even though I've driven buses (on private land) before. Guess with the gearchange, years of studying drivers as a child paid off! In Birmingham at least, most drivers did seem to use the 'pause' rather than 'slam' method.

 

 

is the reasoning for pausing between gear shifts, is to let air pressure build back up in the system or is it something else?

 

also out of curiosity if you dont mind me asking, how did insurance work out?

 

from what iv read (in this very thread I think :) ), while you can drive a 30+ year old buses on a normal licence etc, practically no one will insure you

 

or does this just fall under your "can drive other peoples "cars" 3rd party only" thing?

 

The pause is to make life easier for the gearbox. The closer the rev matching, the easier it is for the gearbox. 

 

His insurer seems ok with non-PSV drivers. As you say, many are not. Don't think my third party cover would stretch to a bus!

 

I should also add that the the National I drove was very HubNut. It was a bit of a shed! I really liked it though. It drove well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Ooh, that is a proper noise. I rather regret not getting any drive-past footage of the one I drove. Thanks for the gear compliments. It was a real head-messer with the right-hand change, and having to take time and driving a friggin' bus AND trying to record a video. I don't think I'd anticipated just how tricky all of that would be, even though I've driven buses (on private land) before. Guess with the gearchange, years of studying drivers as a child paid off! In Birmingham at least, most drivers did seem to use the 'pause' rather than 'slam' method.

 

 

The pause is to make life easier for the gearbox. The closer the rev matching, the easier it is for the gearbox.

 

His insurer seems ok with non-PSV drivers. As you say, many are not. Don't think my third party cover would stretch to a bus!

 

I should also add that the the National I drove was very HubNut. It was a bit of a shed! I really liked it though. It drove well.

Mr FPB7 will be no doubt be along shortly with the finer points of the National, but it was all done in the name of ergonomics; not that it always worked on buses, for example when Western Scottish acquired a number of National 2s they were converted to left hand gearchange mounted on a pedestal in the cab as that is what drivers preferred on a predominantly Leopard fleet.

 

Also a real mindfuck is the first time you drive a Y-type Leopard as the controls are quite literally everywhere. Handbrake by your right buttock, door controls at your left buttock, gearchange on a column by your left knee, indicators mounted by the drivers window, the rest of the controls wherever they fitted in.

 

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...