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Found 219 results

  1. As you all may know, i own a beautiful 2005 picasso that was used and abused by my grandparents for the past 8 years. Now this is my thread dedicated to the restoration of this fine automobile. i mean look at the way the wheel trims glisten in the sun.........it's almost pornographic. So in short you probably already know most of the stuff i have done to this fine machine, however there is still a lot left to do. The next thing is to fit genuine citroen mud flaps and restore the slight scratching on those fine wheel trims, i have noticed one of them is becoming pretty flat from sun exposure which is a massive shame. So in short spending way more than the car is worth because i'm weird and what people would call "good cars" don't interest me at all
  2. Thought I should probably start a thread, given that a few people have suggested it. For my sins, my first car was a 1985 Hyundai Stellar. Bought back in 1997, when the sun still shone, I had more hair, and the world was generally a better place. This may be the earliest photo I have, I think from 1998: Anyway, I drove everywhere in it, and clocked up over 100k miles before I was given an Alfa Romeo 75. So I took the Stellar off the road for some much needed TLC. Made some progress on it - Rebuilt all the suspension, fitted a rebuilt Cortina* rear axle, Princess 4 pot front calipers and Capri vented discs etc - before a couple of house moves and renovations put it on the back burner. * before anyone says they are identical underneath, there are some differences. I fitted a replacement axle fairly early on in my ownership, only to fit that not only was the propshaft flange the wrong size, the UJ was totally different so I couldn't even fit a new yoke. Finding a company on the day before New Year's Eve who could cut off the end, weld a new UJ on and balance it wasn't too easy, especially one that was accessible by push bike! Anyway, late last year I found some renewed motivation, and have been working on it when time and money permit. Here is what it looked like in October: OMG barn find? Front suspension OK at first glance... ...but it has turned out the calipers had seized (so are away being rebuilt) and all the (brand new) ball joint boots had perished: Quite a bit of welding is needed too, but I had a setback just before Christmas when we were burgled and my welder stolen Crusty roof rail I've cleared some of the crap away from it now (it's not stored at mine - I'd love to own somewhere that big!) so might be able to get more photos. Currently working on the rear brakes, and disappointed to find that the shotblasted rear axle is now starting to rust after two coats of POR15 and 7 years storage under cover...
  3. I've had various threads on the go for different collections this year, but thought I'd condense my threads into one manageable thread to document my ham-fisted tinkering. At the turn of the year I was driving a nice, dependable, modern 2011 Peugeot 407 and no other vehicle. It was nice enough, but boring as feck. I'd bought it after a series of disastrous heaps in the awkward age bracket of being new and valuable enough to worry about but old enough to be fucked. The 407 was just too new, too bloated and dull. I had a hankering for old metal, my Mineral Oil withdrawal pangs were strong. From January I started looking, there were eBay bids, missed reserves, wasted trips from Gumtree and other such nonsense. I happened on an automatic Rover 216 GSI with one giffer owner from a year old. The chap was giving up driving at 93 years old and his grandson was moving it on. I bid, and failed. It was in London though, about 420 miles away so I wasn't all that bothered. Of course when he offered it to me for my losing bid after the winning buyer was a no show I said yes. I was on the Megabus down to that London overnight for about £15. I hung about in Liverpool Street station like a mad shivering jakey until my train out to the suburb for my first sight of the new steed. It was battered outside but had been well looked after. A frankly insulting amount of cash changed hands and I was away up the road. We had many adventures together, it was dependable and it whet my appetite for interesting old motors again and proved that the very bottom end of the market was navigable if I had the patience to wade through the sea of shit to find the odd pearl. The 407 was still on the fleet at this point but I was covering a lot of miles in the Rover, with a long commute though the fuel economy wasn't ideal. When a friend's mother was looking for a new diesel saloon to replace the faithful old Xsara she had a scheme was concocted. I sold the 407 to her and was on the hunt for an interesting replacement. When I was growing up my dad had a succession of hopeless shitters, indeed I was brought home from the hospital as a newborn in a brush painted Skoda Super Estelle. The best car he had was a red XUD Peugeot 405 with air conditioning and electric windows. So when I found a 1994 GTXD advertised by someone who could actually compose a car advert in the fashion you would expect of a human being educated to a Primary School level, I pounced. Of course I couldn't buy a car just down the road so it was on the train to Birmingham. First class no less. I stayed in an absolute flea pit of a hotel and drove up the road the next day. This was a proper bit of nostalgia and a really practical borderline classic car. It had been fastidiously maintained by the previous owner. Apart from there being a hole where there was once a stereo and the lack of working air con it was a pleasant drive home. Given their relative scarcity and how dependable this one has proven so far, it's a keeper, I'd struggle to part with it. Two cars just wasn't enough to worry about, so this Citroen C1 was acquired. Pure Aleppo spec. A camel can go for weeks, or months without stopping at a watering hole, the C1 has a similar thirst for Motor Spirit. Man maths were employed and worked out that it would easily* pay for itself. There have been further movements, I'll recap them shortly. I should probably do some work.
  4. Train tickets booked from a train station 30 miles away to save £9 on the recommendation of the Mrs Mrs booked and primed ready to drop me off at said train station. Mobile tool kit primed and ready, missing almost every vital component due to EU regulations about leccy tape and screwdrivers on trains (I left them all at my mums house yesterday). If I do break down, I should have something to listen to while I work out whether I'm with the AA or RAC or none of the above. Not pictured: pile of cash
  5. Well... that escalated quickly. Thank you to Autoshite for once again being the enablers that you are. Now, which one of you horrible lot wants to buy my BX to make up for what you made me do?
  6. Edit: This is longer than initially anticipated. As some will have noticed, Mr cms206 of this parish reckons the death knell for the SVM is close with his recent purchase of a Saab. Going with the fact I still have a 100% Volvo fleet, as does Mr rml2345 of this parish I would personally say it's just diversification. Especially considering the amount of non Volvos cms206 has had these days. This aforementioned diversification continues a pace. Although the paperwork still needs to be done, I have some non Volvo incoming. Background: My aunt got the above pictured 205 back in about 2002 and ran it for about 3 years. By her accounts she put it in the lockup, got a Nissan Almera for whatever reason and basically put the 205 in to the long term deal with pile. It was initially SORN on the blue log book. Back when there was a theft of blue V5s at Swansea and everyone in the country got sent one of the new red ones, one never arrived for the 205 and after that it was properly forgetten about. Well she did. I've been keeping it in my mind every day since then. During a discussion over my birthday dinner a few weeks ago, she mentioned that she was going to pay the gardener she gets in to trim the trees to break in to the lockup because the padlock had rusted solid and she was desperate to use the space in the lockup. I said I'd do it free if I could assess the car. If it was completely fucked, it would have to get dragged out and put on a truck to go to the scrap heap. If I could get it moving, I would make it a project. Next day - 18th January: Time to break open the padlock then. Big screwdriver through the hasp and burst it within 3 seconds. Now to have a look at the car. It's dirty, 3 tyres are flat, one of them creased and the 4th is still at about 10psi. After FIFTEEN YEARS! A gentle rock confirms suspicions that all the wheels are locked so time to get all the wheels off and set about the brakes with a big swing press. The back wheels moved eventually. Judicious use the big hammer, two wheel bolts reinserted and a breaker bar as a lever got the back wheels turning. While the wheels were off I thought I'd see if they held air. All 4 tyres held 35psi. None of them appear to be cracked and the rubber is still "soft" to the scrape of a finger nail. Lack of sunlight attacking them I suppose but it'll get 4 new ones if it becomes roadworthy. After doing the back wheels, the front wheels quickly proved they could be a major problem. I took the calipers, pads and discs completely off the car and even with 2 wheel studs inserted and using the 3/4 drive breaker bar with an extra foot of length over the 1/2 bar, neither wheel / shaft would turn. So either the bearings had seized, the CV joints in the driveshafts had seized or something very sinister was happening inside the gearbox. By this time it was getting dark and cold so time to put it all away for another day. Another day - 24th January: Various discussions were had on the Scotoshite WhatsApp chat and the end result being Mr 320Touring of this parish agreed to come round for a shufty. He was wanting to check up on another car in a lockup only a mile or so away so it was a no brainer. As before, front wheels off, bar on the wheel bolts... nothing. What to do next? We need to use the car's own power to try to free off whatever is seized on the front wheels but the car is nose in to the lockup so we can't get jump leads to it. We need to drag it out but we don't have a tow rope however we manage to find what appears to be a self tightening dog collar / leash in the car and decide to cue MAXIMUM SKETCHINESS!!! A gentle tug from the ML of doom proved the NSF wheel is tight but not seized however the OSF is not moving. Fuck it... drag it while pushing from the front. If we need to shove it back in there's an old tyre in a pile of rubbish waiting to get uplifted by the council that can act as a cushion and the ML will do the job no bother. We also took the front brake discs off to minimise any drag from those. We decided to drag it out just enough to get my jump leads on to the battery. We had already taken the battery out to try it on the leads outside the car. Surprise surprise* it was so dead it had gone open circuit so there was absolutely no magic pixies flowing in to it. Luckily I had an old battery from the 740 that was the same size so that was obtained, inserted and then put to work. Time to leave it to charge for a wee bit. Now that we've got some electricity going from the ML in to the 205 it's time to see what will happen. Thanks to Mr Touring for providing the videos... At one point we were vexed by the daft French screw on battery terminals We were getting a bit desperate by this point. We used quite a lot of "easy start" and the amount of electricity was causing problems. We took a break at this point for 10 mins or so. Mainly to make sure we didn't get too frustrated but also to make sure the maximum possible amount of electricity was in the actual battery so that the leads were just there as a boost. This was clearly a good idea... Learning from all the antics of the last 15 mins or so we left it for another 5 mins. Using a clamp meter we let it get to the point that almost no electricity was flowing in the leads and therefore an almost complete charge and spraying the "easy start" ahead of time, results were finally had... YAY! MUCH ELATION! Oh and that old diesel stinks. Time to get the leads off, move the ML and let the 205 tick over for a few minutes to let the engine settle. Next we found out why the front wheels were not for turning... So yeah. All the CV Joints were completely solid. But anyways it was mission accomplished for the day. We got it moving and a general once over suggests that it should be easily salvageable therefore if auntie wants the space in the lockup, it's going to have to go somewhere. Time to put it back in and wrap up for the day. Thanks to 320 Touring in assistance. The list of work is substantial but not insurmountable. It needs - a battery, front discs, front pads, front calipers, front lower arms, front driveshafts, possibly bearings, rear drums, rear shoes, rear fitting kit, probably handbrake cables, flexi hoses all round, 4 new tyres, 3 of the 4 doors don't work properly, a water leak at the water pump but that can get done with a new cam belt, probably a thermostat, engine oil, filters all round, fresh fuel, a good clean, handbrake light, oil pressure light and a rear screenwash leak inside the tailgate. Oh and a sidelight bulb... Interim time: Lockup secured in Cumbernauld. Car transporter trailer booked for Wed 12th Feb to move it. The V70 will do the honours. Another bit of tinkering - 4th February So it has been agreed the V5 will be transferred in to my name. With an impending trailer move, I thought I'd go back and have another look at things and reassemble the front brakes. I've already installed a new battery so it can be started without the need for leads and it does so quite happily even though the fuel coming from the tank smells like paint. I drove it about in circles for 5 - 10 mins to free up the CV joints and scrape the rust off the brake discs. I also did some straight line tests pulling away in 2nd which seemed to free up the turbo actuator. I also found the radio code so I got that working but you'll have to take my word on it 'cos YouTube will just give me a copyright flag. I shall leave this one here just now. Not much will happen for a while. There will of course be the drama of the trailer move but once it's in the lockup a plan of action will need to be drawn up. A sensible first course will be, I think, to find someone who will give it a once over for MoT viability before any new parts are obtained. All the obvious stuff should be easily DIYable but I don't know what lurks underneath. Some things like the timing belt and water pump will be paid for but the rest will just get picked away at in due course. I also found some period souvenir parking tickets... ---ENDS---
  7. Well I've been meaning to sign up here in forever, but kept forgetting. Thanks to someone over on another forum I frequent poking me about it recently the subject was forced back into my very brief attention span for long enough to get me to act on the instruction. I figure that my little varied fleet might bring you lot some amusement... So...we've got: 1993 Lada Riva 1.5E Estate (now fuel injected, as I reckon the later cars should have been from the factory...). 1989 Saab 900i Automatic. 1987 Skoda 120LX 21st Anniversary Special Edition. 1985 Sinclair C5. 2009 Peugeot 107 Verve. Now getting the photos together has taken me far longer than I'd expected...so you're gonna get a couple of photos of each car for now, and I'll come back with some more information tomorrow when I've got a bit more time... Firstly...The Lada. Before anyone asks - in response to the single question I get asked about this car: No, it is not for sale. Took me 13 years and my father's inheritance to find the thing. Yes, it's got the usual rusty wings...Hoping that will be resolved in the next couple of months. Next, a proper old Saab. One of the very last 8 valve cars apparently, and all the better for it. I've driven two 16v autos and they were horrible - the auto box works sooooo much better with the torque curve of the 8 valve engine. Just wish it had an overdrive for motorway cruising... Next up a *real* Skoda...back when they put the engine where it belongs, right out the back. In the best possible colour of course...eye-searingly bright orange. Seat covers have been added since that photo was taken as it suffers from the usual rotting seat cloth problem that affects virtually all Estelles. Then we have possibly the world's scruffiest Sinclair C5... Realised when looking for this that I really need to get some more photos of the thing...I use it often enough after all! We have a dog who's half husky, so this is a really good way of getting him some exercise. Finally - again, I really need to take more photos of - we have the little Pug 107. Included for the sake of variety even if it's a bit mainstream! First (and probably to be the only) new car I've bought, and has been a cracking little motor and has asked for very little in return for putting up with nearly three years of Oxford-Milton Keynes commuter traffic, before finally escaping that fate when my housemate moved to a new job. Now it doesn't do many miles and is my default car for "when I've managed to break everything else." I'll fill in some more details tomorrow - I warn you though that I do tend to ramble...
  8. Hullo, I'm a masochist from Leeds who is running two rusty, worn out Triumph Dolomites as my only transport in rural Aberdeenshire. You might recognise me from various other forums and Facebook groups. Realistically I need to buy a modern car of some sort, but instead I find myself looking at £300 Citroen BXs and Triumph Acclaims on Gumtree and thinking "yeah, that'd fit right in with the rest of the broken cars I can't afford". On to the cars, the main attraction being my 1976 1850HL "50 Shades of Yellow" that I bought for £850 and is currently my daily driver, here is a picture of it before I sanded off some surface rust and sprayed it badly in the wrong shade of yellow with rattle cans: Within a month of purchase I managed to plant it in to a steel fence backwards after a botched gear change on a wet roundabout and ruined the N/S rear wing, although judging by the other dent that's packed with filler it looks like somebody had already done the same. I also managed to destroy a halfshaft and one of my Sprint alloys (good for an extra 15hp) in the incident, so now it's sitting on it's original steelies but painted black (good for an extra 5hp). It's only broken down on me twice. once with some sort of fuel delivery related problem which may or may not have been an empty fuel tank and once when the thermostat jammed shut and it overheated and blew out some O-rings for the cooling system. It has recently developed a taste for coolant and oil which is rather annoying, although it's done 89,300 miles which is about 80,000 more miles than BL engineering is designed to last, I'm keeping my eye on eBay for replacement engines... I tried to keep ahead of the rust a bit by rubbing down the arches and re-painting them, but apparently rattle can paint isn't great when you are spraying it at -5C, it also highlighted how although my car might have been Inca Yellow in 1976 it's now more of a "cat piss" sort of shade. So I ended up with the wrong shade of yellow which has rust coming back through after 5 weeks. Did I mention I'm incompetent? The other car is the first "classic" car I bought, so I can't bear to sell it. It's a '77 Dolomite 1300 and it cost £1400 (about £400 too much) and has been nothing but a pain in the arse: It looks much prettier (from 100 yards) but that's most due to the darker paintwork hiding the rust. It lives a mollycoddled life in my garage, where it somehow still manages to rust, and is utterly rubbish. 0-60 is measured on a calendar, top speed is 80ish but at that point it uses more oil than petrol, it rarely ventures over 50mph and if you encounter an incline of any sort you can kiss that sort of speed goodbye, along with about £20 of 20W50 as it vanishes out of the exhaust in the form of blue smoke. One of the PO's had clearly never heard of the term "oil change" so it developed into brown sludge that coated everything internally with the next owner(s) blissfully pouring fresh oil on top of it. This lasted until about 600 miles into my ownership when there was muffled "pop" from the engine bay and the car became a 3-cylinder. The cause was catastrophic wear to the top end causing a rocker arm to snap: As this was my first classic car I'd assumed it was supposed to sound like the engine was full of marbles, it wasn't. I put the engine back together with second hand bits declared it utterly fucked and promptly did another 5000 miles with it. After about 3500 of those miles the oil burning started, valve seals have gone so it's been relegated to my parent's garage as a backup car and something to take to local car shows as the 1850 is now embarrassingly ugly. I'm keeping my eye on eBay for replacement engines (deja vu, anybody?) Oh, I also recently reversed it into a parked Ford Fiesta and royally fucked up the rear bumper, rear panel and bootlid. Did I mention I'm incompetent? There have been two other cars in my life. My first car, a 2008 Toyota Yaris 1.0 an it's replacement a 2012 Corsa 1.4T. I didn't really want either of them, but it's a long story involving my parents and poor life choices. Ask if you want to hear it! So that's a brief summary of my current shite. If you want more pictures or details of anything do say as I've got photos of almost everything I'd done with the cars.
  9. Ive been waiting to run a project thread, but as it seems i do so many projects at once picking one is a night mare, plus my plans change faster than the wind, i thought id create a random project thread and id just update it with whatever i was working on at the time. The current list of candidates is as follows.... Vanden Plas 1300 - parked 1993 Mini SPI - finish stripping engine for MG 1300 MGF 75th Edition - NEW - working Rover 75 - dead Ausitn 1300 GT - Sold Purple Morris 1100 - NEXT! - now blue Blue MG 1300 - repaint and rebuild Red 1985 mini - engine rebuilt Green 1971 mini - winter hibernation White MG 1300 repaint and rebuild Blue mk1 Ausitn 1100 welding and paint Blue mk1 wolesley - decide on future Baby Blue mk2 morris 1300 - now dry! Clubman estate - a one day project - more parts sourced Magenta kit car x2 ....chassis one now in my garage to be painted White Vanden Plas 1300 - breaker Ford KA X2 - projects Volvo v70 - going for sale Golf GTE - new daily Mg 1100 - 1963 - new project Mg 1100 - 1965 - poss scrap Other projects Brothers classic mini - engine rebuild an mechanical overhaul But first ive got my parents kitchen to swap.....update....wife now wants a kitchen too - sorted she had a house rabbit
  10. Car : y reg Omega 3.2 MV6 196K Rocker Gaskets replaced last summer at about 183K with genuine parts. Proper cleaned out breather tubes on top of engine. . Oil changed at 193K with genuine GM Fully Syth and Filter. (Cast Housing) No leaks until 3 weeks ago. Started small, I always check the oil before a long journey (and I do a lot of them) and I've been adding a bit more often but now on Thursday I had to top up after 100 miles into a Journey, and Then again 80 Miles later (on Sunday) and again this morning at 70 miles into a Journey, AND then another 70 miles this afternoon, and now 70 miles on it needs more. I calculate about 6 litres for about 450 miles. That's a lot of rust proofing on the exhaust and lots of it on the floor. I've not had it up on the ramps, (as Snow and rain and doesn't fit in my garage) but had it running and had a look at the filter housing area, and seems to be pouring down the back of the engine. At first I wondered if the little wiring plug next to the Oil Filter Housing is likely to leak? but seems to be above that. (Car is too low to see without ramps) When the Rocker gaskets were leaking before it was all very slow. Yes there was an advisory on the MOT, but nothing like this. And it hasn't been leaking in at least 12K since I did them. So what are we thinking ? I blame JohnK !!!!! There is oil on the rocker cover because Spillage
  11. I’ve been considering making a topic for progress with my Felicia for a little while, I want to reflect on what’s been done in a more organised fashion compared to flicking through photos on my phone. I’ve had a keen interest on older generation Skoda for quite some time (100series-Facelift Felicia), I bought this 1999 T reg Skoda Felicia mid April. Would of loved to buy the pre-facelift model but sadly most seem to have been scrapped, however mine does come with the 1.3 OHC engine -the same used in Rapid 136’s, albeit slightly modernised and with Bosch fuel injection producing a whopping 67bhp. First pic after a wash. Missing headlight trim, dinged rear OS door, NS fender is a bit bashed in as the original owner must of had a bit of a bash, the whole bumper sits a little lopsided. Hopefully can get the bodywork pulled at some point. This is my first car that I’ve bought with my own money, so naturally wanted to put in the effort to get her running smoothly with some maintenance: new oil & filter, air filter, coolant flush, wipers, bulbs, spark plugs, valve cover gasket etc. Engine bay needed multiple washes to clean up, looked a right bombsite when I bought it, some neglect was evident from past owner! Three and a half months later and my Felly is now road legal (due to issues with DVLA and V62), what a jolly little car to drive though! The exhaust blows like a wet fart when you press the accelerator but it’s very comical. (Obviously will fix this when I’ve the money, haha.) Driving around aimlessly I’ve covered around 160 miles in a couple of days. I decided to drain the gearbox and refreshed it with some 75W90 SS Gl4, after a few embarrasing car park CRUNCHES into reverse gear enough was enough, definitely was well overdue a change and now it’s silky smooth. Blue Lagoon Metallic is the colour for anyone wondering. (Removed the faded Skoda badge and sprayed the 3D Favorit badge and grill black - perhaps not to everyone’s taste but it’s my car 😄) Next to do is fit new brake discs & yellowstuff pads which have been sat in the boot for a couple months, need to file the edge of the pads down a tad and find a way to remove the locking pin screw from the disc- I can’t seem to get them to turn using an impact screwdriver but perhaps I just need to hit harder! The goal is to fit a few unnecessary modifications, just some stiffer lowering springs and alloy wheels with good tyres. Nothing too crazy. The ride is pretty good, very little body roll, the strut brace seems to work well. A very throwable and responsive supermini, town and rural road driving is an awful lot of fun. If anyone has some Favorit "Skoda" mudflaps let me know as I really would like to replace the ones that are fitted! Updates to come. All welcome to share thoughts and stories alike 🙂
  12. After many a long year of occasional contribution on here I've probably got enough old shite on fleet now to do something I should have done yonks ago and start a project thread. The story so far......... I had an 02 CRV for 6 years and it performed faultlessly as an car taking everything in it's stride. The only issue with it was the 25mpg it returned but as I worked close to home that wasn't an issue. Cue December last year and a new job saw my commute go up from 4 miles a day to 32 miles a day. By March I was drowning in green shield stamps so bought the mighty diesel disAstra from Davehedgehog of this here parish. Shown here on the only off-road parking and only second car parking space I have. The garage contains a few motorbikes so I've always stubbornly stuck to a single car rule so I don't have to move motors to get bikes in and out. More on this detail in a bit..... A combination of broken motorcycles needing worked on, a bike trip around the Baltic and work meant that I soon realised that I had no time to prep the disAstra for its MOT at the start of this month. It wasn't worth enough to pay to have the work done so I decided that the poor old thing would be scrapped in favour of a replacement motor......... The mighty Volvo (V70 D5) was purchased from Ma & Pa forddeliveryboy of this parish and migrated north of the border back to it's natural home. Three days after being pressed into commuting service the mighty volvo suffered a (badly) sticking caliper and much burning brake smells that had to be stripped and rebuilt before work the next day. Sticking piston at that so the whole thing was off and the brakes had to be bled afterwards. Two and a half hours in the pissing rain was a bit character building especially as the still MOT'd (by 3 days) and taxed (but not insured) astra was sitting on the drive. Decision made, insurance checked and a soon to be taken out Admiral multi-car policy will see me with two cars on the fleet again. I could have used one of the bikes but motorway commuting in the pissing rain on two wheels is no fun. The volvo needs an MOT in december so having the astra back on the road will take the pressure off getting that done if it needs work and the weather is bad. And so as the volvo continues to provide daily service, project astra revival starts. Known MOT work needed is frilly arches, broken number plate and front discs and pads so nothing major. Thus far the arches have been sorted without resort to duct tape. After a bit of prodding....... And after the angle grinder was let loose surprisingly it was only the return lip that was rotten so the welder was broken out to lash on some roughly cut fresh metal. Linished off filled, sanded and primed. Note the use of a farmfoods brochure pulled out the bin being used as masking paper for extra shite points. Followed by a near perfect colour matched (*) top coat.... Well I had black on the shelf and it's good enough to stop the primer soaking up the water so that'll do for now. Hoping to get brakes and MOT sorted in the coming week so more to follow soon (hopefully).
  13. This week, for the first time ever, I felt old. I have sciatica which swaps from one side to the other, arthritis in one hand and what I think is the beginnings of IBS. On top of that it took me 2 weeks to remember a registration number that once would take me 2 seconds, and I forgot my parent's wedding anniversary. I'm only 32. Shit. No I'm not. I'm 33. I forgot that too. (Genuinely) So, it's about time I committed some of my tales to paper. Well, a shonky server... but that's the best you can do in 2016. First up, a list of the cars I've owned (as best as I can remember) in chronological order. Main Cars 1985 VW Polo Formel E. C158 TRT. This was given to me even before I passed my test. 1991 Rover Metro S. J801 TAC. Bought about 3 months after I passed my test as I was convinced the Polo was about to shit its gearbox. 1987 Volvo 360 GLT. D899 CBJ ___ Managed three months in a Metro before the small car and smaller petrol tank became a bore. Ford Mondeo and Honda Civic Coupe by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1999 Ford Mondeo Zetec. V384 DBJ. Still the most I've ever spent on a car. It was 3 years old and cost, from memory, about £8,000. Just think of the Rover R8s you could buy with that now! 1987 Volkswagen Golf GTI 8v by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1987 Volkswagen Golf GTI D79 CVV. I very nearly bought a MK1 Golf 1.1 but was persuaded, by my father amusingly, to buy this one from a different friend. From memory I gave about £500 for it, and sold it to some racers later that year for about £300. Amusingly, 16 year later I'd sell the Hartge wheels that came with the car for £530. 1999 Toyota Avensis CDX by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1999 Toyota Avensis CDX. V781 GDP. By far the best car I've ever had. Bought in 2002 for £5300, it had previously been a company car at British Telecom. I ran it from 62,000 to 174,000 before it became surplus to requirements. A German chap bought it on ebay for about £500 and drove over to collect it. Hero. 2001 Ford Mondeo Zetec by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 2001 Ford Mondeo Zetec. Y821 EEB. I should have loved this car. I gave £500 for it in 2008 which was stupidly cheap by anybody's standards. It needed 4 tyres (which actually was nice to pick good ones for once) and a coil spring. Sadly, it was just bill after bill after bill. I sold it and promised to never own another Ford. I nearly succeeded. 1998 Nissan Almera by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1998 Nissan Almera GX Auto. S58 NLO. My late Grandfather's car and, upon reflection, my first proper attempt at bangernomics. I bought it for £500 in 2008 from the estate and ran it for well over a year and 30,000 miles. It was also my first automatic which, whilst a bit dumb, did lock up into overdrive and give a good 36 mpg no matter how it was driven. 2004 Ford Fiesta 1.25 LX and 2006 Ford Focus 2.0 Ghia by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 2004 Ford Fiesta Zetec. AG53 BWL. My wife's car which I ran for a couple of years when I bought her a Focus as a wedding gift. 2003 Rover 75 by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 2003 Rover 75 Club SE. AX53 BFA. This is where my career as a serial car buyer really began. Ignoring all of the warning signs I decided to press a K Series into a daily 100 mile commute, which it did with aplomb. This wasn't actually the car I set out to buy, the one I'd agreed to buy OVERHEATED ON THE FORECOURT whilst I was doing the paperwork. Consequently I couldn't leave fast enough and bought a different car later that day. 2004 Toyota Avensis T30-X by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 2004 Toyota Avensis T3-X. KT53 DWZ. Sensible head back on, I decided to get back into something I trusted when my 3rd son was born. This was a lovely car, but not without its problems. The VVTi oil burning issues are well documented and do frequently occur. Ironically, this was less reliable than the Rover it replaced! Despite fearing the worst and 3 months off the road, the new owner has just MOTd it. 1999 Toyota Avensis SR by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1999 Toyota Avensis SR. V263 GDP. Back into bangernomics territory again. The last MK1 Avensis I had was the best car I'd ever had, so I hoped to replicate it with another T22 Avensis. This one came up for sale in my favourite (and rare) colour with a numberplate sequential to my previous car - so it was meant to be. I still have this now, and tomorrow it will tick around to 185,000 miles having been bought by me at 100,500. Side Bitches 1974 Morris Mini 1000 by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1974 Morris Mini 1000. GEL 517N. Well, I always wanted one - and was young, free, single and well off at the time (2003). A memorable trip to buy it when I called my new girlfriend by my ex girlfriend's name 20 miles into a 200 mile weekend away. She's never forgiven or forgotten but we're still friends. Oh - and married. 1977 Ford Capri II GL by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1977 Ford Capri II 1600 GL. SMY 675R. I can't remember why I bought this, other than I thought it'd be amusing. It was bought from Norwich for £350 and was perfectly well behaved for the 8 months that I had it (other than a flasher unit expiring). I remember being shocked just how much the windscreen would ice up inside, and duly sold it in November to a guy who was going to drive it daily! It's still alive and now, apparently, black! (Update - it's now silver!!!) 1989 Volvo 340 DL by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1989 Volvo 340 DL. G67 AVN. I bought this for £80. Unbelievable. It was utterly bloody perfect. I wanted to do a banger rally which is why the guy gave it to me so cheap. I'm still yet to do that rally, but no longer have the car. I sold it for about £300 to a family who were clearly down on their luck who, I hope, still have the car. 1996 Toyota Granvia by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1996 Toyota Granvia. N775 JEV. My wife and I decided to increase our numbers further and, with our 4th son on the way, larger transport was required. We quickly realised you can either have 4 children and no apparel, or apparel and no children. After trying a very tired Mercedes Viano, the Granvia was found for 1/4 of the price and it's still here 2 years later. I can safely say that we'll never sell it - it really is another member of the family. 1993 Mercedes 190e by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1993 Mercedes 190e. L795 COJ. I've admired these cars since I was a child. In fact, one of the very few toy cars I still have from my childhood is a Mercedes 190e. Regular readers of "Memoirs from the Hard Shoulder" will know what a PITA this car has been since day 1, but I get the feeling it's a keeper. We'll see! 1983 Ford Sierra Base 1.6 by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1983 Ford Sierra Base. GVG 510Y. Not explicitly my car, but it should be documented here for reference. Oh - and the V5 is in my name. The story is online for all to read as to how five of us acquired what is believed to be the only remaining Ford Sierra Base. Make a brew and read it, it's a fantastic story. 1982 Ford Sierra L by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1982 Ford Sierra L. LCR 503Y. I accidentally won this on ebay for £520. Upon reflection, I shouldn't have sold it - but short stop of saying I regret it. I could never get truly comfortable driving it and, in fairness, I could scratch my Sierra itch with the base if I wanted. Sold it at a stupid profit of £1250. It is believed to be the oldest remaining Ford Sierra in the UK. 1979 Volvo 343 DL by Bornite Identity, on Flickr 1979 Volvo 343 DL. DBY 466T As you'll see above, I'd had a 360GLT as a younger lad and fancied one of these earlier cars. The variomatic is, frankly, terrible but amusing. This car has just 8000 miles on the clock and inside was absolutely timewarp. Sadly, the huge bill for the Mercedes 190e cylinder head rebuild meant I had to sell this car shortly after acquiring it. Since then I've had a bit of money luck, and now realise I didn't need to sell it after all. Typical. I think that's it. My arthritis is playing up even more now. I've left out a few cars that were actually my wife's, but if I find pictures will add them in at a later date. I'll run this as an ongoing thread on cars and what's happening. Current SitRep: Purple Avensis: Just about to click over 185,000. Minor drama this week when an HT lead split but otherwise utterly fantastic, fantastically boring and boringly reliable. Granvia: Just done 1000 miles in a month around Norfolk, 6 up with suitcases. 31mpg achieved on the way up which is good for an old tub with a 3.0 Turbo Diesel on board. ODO displaying 175,000 which is a mix of miles and kilometers. Say 130,000 miles for argument's sake. Mercedes: Being a PITA. It's had the top end completely rebuilt after the chain came off. Now needs welding to pass another MOT and the gearbox bearings are on strike. It's about to go into the garage for winter until I can stomach it again. 151,000 miles on the clock. Sierra bASe: Still on sabbatical with AngryDicky who only took it bloody camping in cornwall! Legend.
  14. I thought I'd start a thread for this as I'll probably end up asking all sorts of questions, given that this is my first 'proper' Citroën. So... the ground clearance lever won't go all the way to the highest setting (all others work), which is bad 'cos the book says I need it to do that in order to check the LHM level. It feels like something's seized, so I don't want to force it. Any ideas for a plan of attack would be much appreciated. Next up are the wheels. I now have a set of 205 pepperpots that have just gone off for powder coating & I need to get some tyres for them. The handbook says the car should have 165/70R14s on, the wheels came with 185/65R14 on. Any thoughts about what size I should get please? Cheers.
  15. First some background: I was brought up with no car interest, a car was transport and nothing more which resulted in a selection of poor cheap cars being the cars of my youth. Fast forward many years (just over 9 years ago) and I have a wonderful* Vauxhall Vectra estate to carry us about. Unfortunately it is crap and throws fault codes at us with nothing being there when it is checked (even at Vauxhall) As Mrs T is the main pilot of this chariot with the two little miss T's on board, it has to go. The hunt is on for the new steed to safely and comfortably carry the family around. I have a company car at the time so big journeys are not an issue. ebay is my weapon of choice to find the new family car. It has to be good value cheap for no other reason than I am tight. Weeks of research with lots of cars that are too expensive and too far away for easy collection end up in my watch list. Finally a possible is spotted in Fife. I go and have a look and find a poor looking but solid car. One previous owner and lots of history. The auction was to end on the Saturday at midday, we were going to be out! I decided on how much I was willing to gamble on it and on the Saturday morning I put in my max bid but straight away it went to my max bid, I was winning but it had three hours to go with no room for me to go up! We went out anyway. I spent the next three hours kicking myself for not bidding more while we were out as it was the first car I had seen that fitted my criteria. Fate was in charge. On returning home I go straight on ebay to find 'Congratulations.............' For the grand total of £500 I had just won this fine vehicle! It has 5 months MOT and after fitting seat belts in the rear for the girls car seats it is pushed into daily service. My gamble and subsequent use results in a perfectly reliable car that actually does what it is supposed to do. Even more importantly Mrs T loves it so a win all round. All my cars have names (most are earned over a bit of time) and this one is called 'Gwendolen' ( G reg car and from Wales originally. I hate the name but I am not going to argue) That sums up part one, more will be along later (probably much later)
  16. So to recap. After a painfully long time (well a month) I finally bought a MGB GT. I've always fancied one and after seeing one at a local garage (which turned out to be a bit shit) the urge sprang up again. Anyway after a lot of searching I ended up with this. Seems pretty straight and underneath don't appear to not been welded too much. Worst point that I've found in the leaf spring mount. I'm not going to cover all the different things and stuff just yet as its already in the thread, so I shouldn't make this too long! I've not owned a car this old and never something with a carburettor. So I don't quite know what I'm doing with a lot of this, and will have plenty of questions! Part of the reason why I bought it was so I had something that I could fiddle with and learn on. As the other thread got a bit long, I thought it would be a better idea to split and start here.
  17. Morning chaps, long time no see. I've not had much in the way of shite to share on this forum of late but I have now gone some way to redeeming myself with this glorious old heap, an eBay purchase which I won last night. Fortunately the seller seems decent and isn't in any rush for it to leave so there won't be much happening for a few weeks until collection can be arranged, leaves me plenty of time to clear the decks in preparation. The essential stats are that it's a 1977 Princess 1.8, I think it's a base model and a Series 1 given it's not got a 1.7/2.0 O-series engine which I would have preferred. Not sure how rubbish the B-Series is in this thing but I guess we'll see. It's got an MOT and has been woken from many years of slumber fairly recently, I think it was on eBay last year prior to the current owner obtaining it but I don't have any details. I think it's a base model and lacks power steering or indeed any equipment to speak of. It's apparently very solid and has been undersealed, there's some rot above the bootlid and in the doors and the bonnet looks awful but is mostly surface corrosion I think. It'll be getting a proper going over once I get my hands on it, a full service and brake refurb is likely the first port of call, plus finding someone local who can pump up the hydragas. My sole experience of these is driving Philibusmo's utterly ruined example (OKK if anyone remembers the ex-Vulgalour one) a few years back and I was so impressed at how well it drove considering the state it was in, I've wanted one for years so this is a slightly weird dream come true. Feel free to chip in with anecdotes, advice and mockery. More details will probably surface in a few weeks once it lands. It has MOT but it's on ancient tyres and has electrical issues (I know, who'd have thought?) meaning the lights and cooling fan don't work. Given that it's in Kent and I'm in Devon, I am probably going to take the easy way out and Shiply it home. Plenty of time yet to make some arrangements for that. Watch this space.
  18. Take note of the poor things that ended up with my lazy arse. This is going to be a dull disaster but welcome to a random list of the poor unfortunate souls that come into my possession. Currently - '88 Peugeot 205 1.1 GL - '07 Suzuki EN125 2A (TWO WHEELS!?) That's it I told you it would be boring. I'll just not mention the previous 1.2 Clio's since one is perpetually SORN'd as a donor Clio (RIP SLOP FOREVER IN OUR HEARTS AND TATTOOED ON MY LEG) and the other one was moved on to some other 19 year old to probably crash (YOU WERE A GOOD FREN) Previous - SL04PKE - '04 1.2 Clio - Crashed it, now in Valhalla - V36FRN - '99 1.2 Clio - L38WLD - '94 1.9 Xantia
  19. Payment sent. V5 filled in. @worldofceri has loaded and left the sellers compound. Expected ETA around 1pm. Edit: Interesting bit of the thread starts here:
  20. For as long as I can remember I have been aware of a dead K-prefix Mondeo saloon languishing on the drive of a house about two streets away from here. It had obviously been sat there for many years without moving. I kept meaning to drop a note through the door enquiring about it, but as always I never got round to it. Until now. With Bob the Renault 6 currently on hold pending a possible sale after lockdown and the Maxi mothballed due to lack of places to take it to I was getting bored, so last Friday I did just that. Things moved on very rapidly from there. Timeline: Saturday morning. I received a phone call from the owner's daughter, who informed me that her father had owned the car since it was 18 months old and cherished it for years, doing about 2 or 3 thousand miles a year in it until 2013, when it failed the MoT: Date tested 17 September 2013 Fail Mileage 70,926 miles Reason(s) for failure Service brake: efficiency below requirements (3.7.B.7) Brakes imbalanced across an axle (3.7.B.5b) He was told by the local garage he used that it would cost about £1000 to fix even if they could get the parts, which they said was doubtful. How can inefficient and unbalanced rear brakes cost that much to fix? And can Mondeo parts be unobtainium already? Maybe I will find out in due course. Anyway, he decided that was more than the car was worth but, being very attached to it, he simply parked it on the drive and left it there. Apparently he died about 3 years ago but his wife couldn't bear to see it go, so there it stayed until now. Coincidentally his wife died a few weeks ago, so I hope my approach didn't seem like grave robbing. Their daughter was planning to have the car taken away for scrap, so I was intending to offer her scrap value for it and see if it could be saved. However, she was so pleased at the prospect of her dad's beloved motor being revived that, without me making an offer, she immediately offered it to me for the princely sum of zero pounds. She also agreed that quicksilver and myself could work on it where it sat until such time as we could move it. She said that she would endeavour to find the V5 and the keys. Timeline: Saturday afternoon. Checking the registration online showed it to be a 2.0i Ghia, built in Belgium in May 1993 and registered in the UK on 15th June 1993. K prefix registrations ran from August 1992 to July 1993 but the Mondeo was not launched in the UK until 22nd March 1993, so had been in production less than three months, making this a very early Mark 1. Has been on SORN since September 2013. Let's go and see what we have. It's walking distance so that counts as exercise doesn't it 😃. Didn't even know if it was a manual or an automatic. Turns out it's a 5-speed manual. Apart from flat tyres it doesn't look to bad from a distance. But what about the blind side next to the fence. Fortunately it had been parked far enough away to see it. Urgh! It's green instead of blue. Back of the roof has bloomed badly, but laquer doesn't appear to have peeled. We took a cordless tyre inflator so the first job was to attempt to pump the tyres up. We weren't very hopeful as it had been sitting here for 7 years. The two nearside tyres had 0psi in them, the offside front had about 7psi in it and the offside rear had about 12psi in it. They were all pumped up to a nominal 30psi and appeared to stay up. Timeline: Sunday afternoon. Let's take a bucket of soapy water round and give it a quick swill. Three tyres still up. Nearside rear flat again. 75% success rate. Not bad. Pumped the flat one back up again. Throw bucket of water over car and apply sponge and nylon brush. While washing it we noticed bubbles issuing from from a tiny pinhole in the bottom of the sidewall of the nearside rear tyre. That will be why it went flat again then. It looks like there may have been a thorn or a sharp piece of stone on the drive next to the bottom of the tyre and when it went completely flat the weight of the car pushed it through the sidewall. That's looking better. Not much more we can do without the keys as it's all locked up. Timeline: Monday morning. Another phone call from the daughter. She is at the house and has found the V5 and one key. Also handbook and service record. Thinks there may be another key somewhere. We wander round there and do the necessary paper work. It is now offically ours! Timeline: Monday afternoon. Send off new keeper slip and SORN declaration. This time we have to take the Zafira full of tools in an attempt to get it moving. It has been left with the handbrake on and the front discs look well rusty, so I bet the brakes have seized on. Takes 2 hands to lift the handbrake lever, then 2 hands to press the button and release the ratchet. Rock the car gently and, wonder of wonders, all four wheels appear to rotate. First hurdle overcome. Don't want to bore you guys but some of you might like to know our technique for attempting to revive a long-dead engine, honed at various Field of Dreams chod-tinkerings. Check oil and water levels. Oil looks pretty clean so probably serviced not long before it was laid up. Remove spark plugs. These all look in good condition. Pour a spoonful of engine oil into each cylinder just to give some extra bore lubrication on initial turn over. Engine compartment is so cramped that can't see an easy way to try and turn the engine with a spanner, so drop a long screwdriver into one of the spark plug holes so that it rests on top the piston, engage fourth gear and attempt to push the car down the drive, which fortunately has a reasonable downward slope. Watch the screwdriver and, sure enough, we see it rising. The engine isn't seized, thank goodness we don't have another Bob on our hands. Because the owner's other car was parked alongside we could not get the Zafira in to jump the battery so we connected up one of the two knackered old batteries we had brought round. Didn't want to risk connecting across a totally dead battery and shorting out the other one, so left the positive terminal connected to the original battery but disconnected the earth wires from the original battery and connected the negative jump lead to the isolated leads, thus removing the original battery from the system. Doing it this way ensures that the positive connections are still kept clear of any metalwork that could cause a short and the negative connection is earthed anyway, so doesn't matter if that touches any other metal. Turned on the ignition and, lo and behold, we have assorted dashboard warning lights. Hit the starter. Click. We were right, this battery is knackered. Try the other one. Whirr, whirr, the engine spins over. Let it spin until the oil pressure light goes out. Clean the plugs with a wire brush (not that they appeared to need it) and replace them. Reconnect the HT leads, making sure they are in the right order. Chug, chug, chug. Engine reluctantly turns over but not fast enough to fire. Remember we have a the tiny but powerful Chinese jump pack in the glove box of the Zafira, so this is deployed. Chug, chug, cough, splutter, BLOODY HELL IT'S ONLY RUNNING! Remove jump pack and it is still running on the alternator output. Leave it running while we check the condition of the spare wheel. Full size alloy, not one of these horrible space-saver things. Appears to have some air in it. Pump it up and fit it to the nearside rear. Try driving it up and down the drive to test the brakes. As we expected they were not great, but worked well enough to stop it eventually. Unfortunately the handbrake would also stop the car but the ratchet would not re-engage so having freed off the brakes it now insisted on rolling down the drive. So we took a deep breath and, leaving everything behind, we set off for home. No collection thread as the distance involved was about 500 yards, but target achieved with no problems, except for the power-assisted steering, which apparently now isn't. Have a cup of tea then walk back round to pile all the detritus back into the Zafira and drive it home. Gone. Mossy piece of tarmac blinking in the sunlight for the first time in 7 years. In its new home. Bob is not impressed by this non-French interloper and turns his back on it. Let's see what we have. Nicely mouldy steering wheel. Oh look, footwell lights. I say, how posh, did I mention it's a Ghia. Illuminated vanity mirrors. Can this get any posher? Optional giffer pack included. Lots of damp and mouldy boot trim now basking in the sunshine. So, what is the overall assessment. On cursory inspection it appears to have zero rot on the bodywork or the underside. Haven't tried everything yet. A few of the lights don't work (hopefully just bulbs or mouldy connections). Nor do the screenwashers. The two main problems seem to be the non-working power steering and the ABS warning light being on. But haven't had time for in-depth investigations yet, so here's hoping an MoT can be passed eventually. No rush, it is a lockdown project after all. By now I am sure you are all bored to death so I will stop rambling. Bloody hell these threads take a long time to compile. Stay tuned for more developments. Or not.
  21. Well, here we go again. I bit the bullet and bought me this. It's still up at the lot right now, there will be a miniature Collection Thread embedded in this thread when I go fetch it. Hopefully if the weather's good, that'll be this weekend. So, what is it? As the title suggests, it's a 1951 Pontiac Chieftain. It's got a flat-head straight eight hiding in the engine bay, 4.4 litres of it. It's bolted to a 4-speed Hydra-Matic Drive gearbox. No torque converter on this one, just a fluid coupling. 116 horses at a screaming 3700 RPM, 240lb/ft at 2000. It idles at 375 RPM. Redline just shy of 4k. Did I mention it's quite big? Sixteen foot eight from end to end and it seats six people in comfort. Every door has a quarter-light, too. Comfort is provided by properly sized tyres and (quite surprisingly for the age of it) double independent wishbone front suspension. Steering is via worm/wheel steering box so is moderately direct and the brakes are hydraulic drums all round. Modern and scientific! It's an honest example; looks to have had a "restoration" about 15-20 years back and the rust is coming through the seams and filler. The bottoms of the door skins have gone, the bottom of the A-pillars have gone (the front doors, on a single hinge a piece still open and close with one finger!) And it's got a couple holes and blebs in all the places you would expect. Not much electrical works. It needs to be completely rewired because someone has "converted" it to 12V. Thankfully it was originally negative ground so that's a good start. Gauges and such can be driven from a 6V bucking converter. Engine has had some work done on it- starts and runs nicely with very little greb coming out of the exhaust. It's got a few gaskets that need replacing and the tappets need some major adjustment, the gearbox engages gears correctly, the steering is okay but has a lot of slack in the center and the brakes work well, dont sink or feel spongy but need adjustment. More to come. I'll post up more pictures when I get it home. --Phil
  22. That bit hiding up behind the air filter and infront of the turret made a prolonged, loud, farty vibratey noise (loud enough to be clearly audible in the cabin with the radio on) twice today, both times it did it the nose was pointing down a steep hill and we had just parked and turned off the engine. It goes on for best part of a minute, so managed to track it down. Initial impressions are fuck knows what it is but it's clearly been bodged in the past. The yellow hose has clearly been disconnected sometime, by someone, for some reason, somewhere. Thats the blighter. Does someone want to tell me why it's blowing raspberries at me?
  23. Decided its about time to lump all my vehicles in one post, so i have a diary of progress, or more likely disasters! First one on the fleet is Shonky, a bx 17tgd. My favourite out the lot, and has taken me to France numerous times. All time best I've managed on a run is 65mpg taking it easy. He was a bit of a mess when I bought him, hence the name. However he was remarkable solid, just needing the usual inner wing repairs doing. He also had cambelt, new rear arm bearings, alloys and new tyres, replacement drivers seat, and next year I'll be replacing his rear quarter panel as its been bashed numerous times in the past. Next came the Xsara enterprise van, nicely run in at 278k now with a massive history file. It had one company owner from new until I bought it two years ago. Cambelt just changed and now showing an engine management light, something to do with the maf sensor. I've just bought a Lexia and trying to get my head round it so diagnostics might become easier. really need a better laptop on Xp than the one I'm using to install it on. Then there's the bargain Xm I bought for £200 which came with a full tank of petrol! Known as the Gaffer due to his reg plate, he had a full exhaust and flew through his Mot. Did about 2000 miles in him but then he blotted his copy book by bursting a main hydraulic pipe. Currently sat on the drive awaiting repairs. He's pretty solid underneath but suffering laquer peel on the roof and a few other little places. Gaffer is a 2 litre 16v petrol automatic so likes a drink. A little c2 was bought as i needed to put my car no claims on something before I lost them. Somehow got the nickname of Project Pinky, mainly due to his manly colour. Just finished giving him a full service, cambelt, front shocks, strut mounts and bearings, brake discs and pads, and bottom ball joints. Changed his rotten aftermarket replacement front wing for a temporary black one to I can either find a replacement in the correct colur or get rattle can a panel up. Also got a replacement interior in the original funky orange colour of Ebay for 10p, yes 10p. This has been fitted to replace the ones which had some nasty fag burns. Aircon even works too, a bonus in the summer. Finally theres is Bleriot, my problem child. Purchased for the sum of £215, he's a 1.7d, so epic ally slow, and suffers really loud intake noise. He will never be a show car, he's had some poor quality repairs in the past but he's fun to drive with no pas and a very short first gear. Currently just gone round the back to start replacement of the front to rear hydraulic pipes, as one burst. Pipes are a bit rusty! After a clean up with the pressure washer. surprisingly all the usual rot points at the back are solid. I'll rust treat any little bits and wax oil before he goes back on the road. Found a little more welding needed on the sill. He needs all his front inner wings doing too, but i'm trying to ignore this lol Oh and yes, this little beauty is getting delivered tomorrow, care of WorldofCeri. Its a 1,4 petrol St tropez. Needs some welding doing, a good valet, and service before a mot. Its completely poverty spec, with no central locking and keep fit windows. It does however have a factory fitted glass tilt sunroof and funky seats. I'll try my best to remember to keep this thread updated with fleet updates and repairs.
  24. So many broken picture links! I'll fix it one day. I feel I can finally unlurk properly now that I have something worthy of Autoshite to post about. Day One In the cold light of Day Two Came with some great features. The best thing about vinyl is that you *can* scrub it clean and with this old boat that was needed; everything was sticky and left a black residue on the hands. I've only been able to bring myself to spend an hour on the driver's door, the rest will have to wait for now. Doesn't look as big as it feels, weirdly. This is going to be my new daily in a few months, just got to get through a lot of cleaning and a bit of fettling. She's actually not that bad overall and only cost me £450 (plus £25 day insurance to collect her). The problems? >Quite a few rust blebs, but nothing serious or structural >Handbrake needs adjusting, I have to chock the wheels when parked on the drive >Driver's door window doesn't work >Probably decades of hand grease and silicone spray, built up in alternating layers. The engine bay is cleaner than the cabin. >Bonnet rams don't hold up the bonnet. >Neither do the boot rams. >Garage fitted electric fuel pump has no supressor, interferes with the LW/MW radio >PYE tape deck needs new belts, music played on it sounds like it's underwater >Bad previous respray with water contamination. But you know what, none of that matters. She's supremely comfortable and with some TLC over the summer should be in fine fettle. I'm not sure whether or not the people that look with face agog and jaw slack as I drive past are impressed, worried or amazed that a beige Princess with a brown roof still exists and is out on the road with someone a long way from pensionable age driving it.
  25. Hi all, new to the forum. Thought you might be interested in what I've got myself into I'd been after my first classic car for a while. If it's big and made in the 70s I'm interested. Looked at few things like P6s, Zodiacs, Victors, SD1s and various other things. Problem was I didn't want to spend a boatload of money on something that looked alright but underneath was actually a total heap. The solution was to buy a complete heap in the first place and spend the money fixing it. So in January I went ahead and bought this from a colleague at work who was moving away and needed to get shot of it. It's a part finished restoration (I prefer not started) and it needs a whole load of help if it's going to stand any chance of using a road again. Pros It's right up my street. Granada Coupes are quite odd and certainly stand out from the norm. It still has the original engine, box, interior and most trim. It came with loads of panels I need to repair it (mostly original Ford stock). It came with so many spares I could probably build a few Granadas and still have stuff left over. It was cheap. Cons Most of the front end has been cut off. Most of the body structure is quite rotten. It's going to take me ages. I work at a restoration company and my boss kindly allows me to keep the car there. So I've got access to all the gear I need to restore it. I've been busy on the car for a while now so will post more pics over the coming days. Cheers
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