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vulgalour

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  1. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from LightBulbFun in The new news 24 thread   
    Neighbour was continuing with his clear out so I ended up with a whole host of light bulbs, electrical connectors, metal drip trays, more tools (including a really neat old-fashioned torque wrench with the swing arm indicator on it), and a good sized bottle of welding gas that he no longer needs.  Even if the gas is only a little sniff in the bottom of the bottle that's fine by me, I've only got the tiniest bit to do on the Maestro and haven't been able to get a refill sorted due to other expenses lately.  He's warned me that there might be more stuff up for grabs as he continues the clear out and I have zero complaints, so much of the stuff has been genuinely useful odds and sods, some of which has been used quite regularly.
  2. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from wuvvum in The new news 24 thread   
    Neighbour was continuing with his clear out so I ended up with a whole host of light bulbs, electrical connectors, metal drip trays, more tools (including a really neat old-fashioned torque wrench with the swing arm indicator on it), and a good sized bottle of welding gas that he no longer needs.  Even if the gas is only a little sniff in the bottom of the bottle that's fine by me, I've only got the tiniest bit to do on the Maestro and haven't been able to get a refill sorted due to other expenses lately.  He's warned me that there might be more stuff up for grabs as he continues the clear out and I have zero complaints, so much of the stuff has been genuinely useful odds and sods, some of which has been used quite regularly.
  3. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from CaptainBoom in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Another update on this - there will be pictures and videos and stuff in the future, for now I just want to keep you abreast of progress - since Pat and I spent some time figuring some stuff out.
    Ignoring the Lanchester wiring diagrams and focusing instead on the RF95 regulator box wiring diagram and the PLC6 ignition switch wiring diagram, we managed to get quite a few systems operational and eliminate the weird light gremlin.  This is very good.  However, the starter motor doesn't want to engage properly now, it seems to be stuck so I'll have to pull that off and bench test it.  I'd also got the field and main wires on the dynamo the wrong way around and when trying to remove said wires to correct this, the eyelet sheared off the wire and instead of the nut coming undone, the post is now loose and spinning.  Additionally, there is literally no space to get at the stud to tighten it up and hold it while undoing the nut so the dynamo is going to have to be removed from the car to sort that out.
    The good thing is I now have all of these systems working:
    Headlight dip Headlight main Rear sidelights (no brake lights, the switch seems to be the culprit here) Rear number plate light Oil light Instrument panel lights I probably have the interior light circuit working but didn't test it with a bulb because I forgot.  It was working, so it should still be working.  Horns and semaphores aren't wired up yet, nor are the front sidelights, so I don't know if they work or not.  The Ignition light does work, but I'm not sure yet if it works exactly properly because as with the above, I haven't tested it properly yet so I'm ignoring it for now.  I do need to get a new pair of headlight bulbs, one of the dipped filaments has burned out (you can see it sat in the bottom of the bulb) but that's hardly surprising since they're the lights the car came to us with.
    The key to getting this working was to have Pat read out what circuit should be going where and then do that one bit at a time.  The previous work labelling and checking continuity helped enormously and while there was nothing massively amiss with what I'd done, it did help identify issues like the dynamo being wired incorrectly.  We also no longer have the issue of the headlights turning the rear lights off, I don't know what was causing that, but something we did today resolved it.
  4. Like
    vulgalour reacted to RayMK in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Well done!  That should turn down the frustration a notch or two.
  5. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from Dyslexic Viking in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Another update on this - there will be pictures and videos and stuff in the future, for now I just want to keep you abreast of progress - since Pat and I spent some time figuring some stuff out.
    Ignoring the Lanchester wiring diagrams and focusing instead on the RF95 regulator box wiring diagram and the PLC6 ignition switch wiring diagram, we managed to get quite a few systems operational and eliminate the weird light gremlin.  This is very good.  However, the starter motor doesn't want to engage properly now, it seems to be stuck so I'll have to pull that off and bench test it.  I'd also got the field and main wires on the dynamo the wrong way around and when trying to remove said wires to correct this, the eyelet sheared off the wire and instead of the nut coming undone, the post is now loose and spinning.  Additionally, there is literally no space to get at the stud to tighten it up and hold it while undoing the nut so the dynamo is going to have to be removed from the car to sort that out.
    The good thing is I now have all of these systems working:
    Headlight dip Headlight main Rear sidelights (no brake lights, the switch seems to be the culprit here) Rear number plate light Oil light Instrument panel lights I probably have the interior light circuit working but didn't test it with a bulb because I forgot.  It was working, so it should still be working.  Horns and semaphores aren't wired up yet, nor are the front sidelights, so I don't know if they work or not.  The Ignition light does work, but I'm not sure yet if it works exactly properly because as with the above, I haven't tested it properly yet so I'm ignoring it for now.  I do need to get a new pair of headlight bulbs, one of the dipped filaments has burned out (you can see it sat in the bottom of the bulb) but that's hardly surprising since they're the lights the car came to us with.
    The key to getting this working was to have Pat read out what circuit should be going where and then do that one bit at a time.  The previous work labelling and checking continuity helped enormously and while there was nothing massively amiss with what I'd done, it did help identify issues like the dynamo being wired incorrectly.  We also no longer have the issue of the headlights turning the rear lights off, I don't know what was causing that, but something we did today resolved it.
  6. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from LightBulbFun in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Another update on this - there will be pictures and videos and stuff in the future, for now I just want to keep you abreast of progress - since Pat and I spent some time figuring some stuff out.
    Ignoring the Lanchester wiring diagrams and focusing instead on the RF95 regulator box wiring diagram and the PLC6 ignition switch wiring diagram, we managed to get quite a few systems operational and eliminate the weird light gremlin.  This is very good.  However, the starter motor doesn't want to engage properly now, it seems to be stuck so I'll have to pull that off and bench test it.  I'd also got the field and main wires on the dynamo the wrong way around and when trying to remove said wires to correct this, the eyelet sheared off the wire and instead of the nut coming undone, the post is now loose and spinning.  Additionally, there is literally no space to get at the stud to tighten it up and hold it while undoing the nut so the dynamo is going to have to be removed from the car to sort that out.
    The good thing is I now have all of these systems working:
    Headlight dip Headlight main Rear sidelights (no brake lights, the switch seems to be the culprit here) Rear number plate light Oil light Instrument panel lights I probably have the interior light circuit working but didn't test it with a bulb because I forgot.  It was working, so it should still be working.  Horns and semaphores aren't wired up yet, nor are the front sidelights, so I don't know if they work or not.  The Ignition light does work, but I'm not sure yet if it works exactly properly because as with the above, I haven't tested it properly yet so I'm ignoring it for now.  I do need to get a new pair of headlight bulbs, one of the dipped filaments has burned out (you can see it sat in the bottom of the bulb) but that's hardly surprising since they're the lights the car came to us with.
    The key to getting this working was to have Pat read out what circuit should be going where and then do that one bit at a time.  The previous work labelling and checking continuity helped enormously and while there was nothing massively amiss with what I'd done, it did help identify issues like the dynamo being wired incorrectly.  We also no longer have the issue of the headlights turning the rear lights off, I don't know what was causing that, but something we did today resolved it.
  7. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from RayMK in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Another update on this - there will be pictures and videos and stuff in the future, for now I just want to keep you abreast of progress - since Pat and I spent some time figuring some stuff out.
    Ignoring the Lanchester wiring diagrams and focusing instead on the RF95 regulator box wiring diagram and the PLC6 ignition switch wiring diagram, we managed to get quite a few systems operational and eliminate the weird light gremlin.  This is very good.  However, the starter motor doesn't want to engage properly now, it seems to be stuck so I'll have to pull that off and bench test it.  I'd also got the field and main wires on the dynamo the wrong way around and when trying to remove said wires to correct this, the eyelet sheared off the wire and instead of the nut coming undone, the post is now loose and spinning.  Additionally, there is literally no space to get at the stud to tighten it up and hold it while undoing the nut so the dynamo is going to have to be removed from the car to sort that out.
    The good thing is I now have all of these systems working:
    Headlight dip Headlight main Rear sidelights (no brake lights, the switch seems to be the culprit here) Rear number plate light Oil light Instrument panel lights I probably have the interior light circuit working but didn't test it with a bulb because I forgot.  It was working, so it should still be working.  Horns and semaphores aren't wired up yet, nor are the front sidelights, so I don't know if they work or not.  The Ignition light does work, but I'm not sure yet if it works exactly properly because as with the above, I haven't tested it properly yet so I'm ignoring it for now.  I do need to get a new pair of headlight bulbs, one of the dipped filaments has burned out (you can see it sat in the bottom of the bulb) but that's hardly surprising since they're the lights the car came to us with.
    The key to getting this working was to have Pat read out what circuit should be going where and then do that one bit at a time.  The previous work labelling and checking continuity helped enormously and while there was nothing massively amiss with what I'd done, it did help identify issues like the dynamo being wired incorrectly.  We also no longer have the issue of the headlights turning the rear lights off, I don't know what was causing that, but something we did today resolved it.
  8. Like
    vulgalour reacted to 3VOM in The new news 24 thread   
    Just to add my experience. When I first got them, I found it difficult to get use to things like the edge of stair treads, steps and the like. Just be careful when you first start wearing them.
  9. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from auntiemaryscanary in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Had another attempt at this today.  I followed what seems to be the correct instructions for the RF95 regulator box and the PLC6 ignition switch.  However, something is still wrong.
    As soon as I turned the ignition on, the wiper motor was running.  It seems the switch (the knobs on the dashboard) is reluctant to disengage, so I just unwired the wiper motor for testing purposes.
    Headlights work normally and don't turn off the rear lights now.
    Rear side and brake lights don't work at all.  Bulbs are good, wiring seems correct and good, but I can't get anything out of them at all.
    Number plate light glows dimly when ignition is turned on, which is shouldn't do.  It otherwise operates normally when side/head lights are turned on.  What's weird about this is the number plate wiring piggybacks off the rear lights so if it's coming on with sidelights the rear lights should be too.  Couldn't find any connections or earth points amiss on this.
    Haven't tested anything else, I was just trying to get the lights working today.  I think I'm going to have to get someone else in to sort this out because I feel like I'm just going around in circles at this point.  It's likely I've wired something incorrectly.  It's also likely there's a faulty component, intermittent or otherwise, that's manifesting problems that aren't actually of my making.  I haven't the experience to know what's causing the problems that are happening.  I do have information, but again my lack of experience is making it difficult for me to understand the information.
    If it hadn't been for the wiring, the car would probably be driving by now, it's really held everything up.  If you are, or know of, someone in the Maidstone area that would be interested in trying to help me figure out what on earth is wrong with this job, please let me know.  I'm a bit skint as I type this unfortunately, which is why I'm not bothering a business with the request for help.  I suspect someone with experience will take one look at it, move two wires, and it'll all be sorted.
  10. Like
    vulgalour reacted to Popsicle in The new news 24 thread   
    Take it easy when you first use them, it makes the world a strange looking place, things that you no are dead straight start to become curved in your periphery vision. Worth persevering with though, I still automatically look over my specs for close up things after 10 years of the varifocals!
  11. Like
    vulgalour reacted to morrisoxide in Classic car show Tadcaster   
    This Cortina Crusader is owned by the chap at my local parts store.






     


     


  12. Like
    vulgalour reacted to morrisoxide in Classic car show Tadcaster   
    Then this Panhard turned up.




     

  13. Like
    vulgalour reacted to morrisoxide in Classic car show Tadcaster   
    This Railton was ace.





    As was this Armstrong Siddeley.




  14. Like
    vulgalour reacted to morrisoxide in Classic car show Tadcaster   
    Yes that Tadcaster of John Smiths & Sam Smiths fame.
    It was my Dad's birthday so we took a nice scenic route in the Oxford Traveller.
    Some Pics.


    A Mini in 1970's guise 



    Pretty car



  15. Like
    vulgalour reacted to Blake's Den in 1975 Turner Ranger BL parts bin 'tractor'   
    I've posted this previously on the 'cars that you never knew existed' thread and also on the 'ambitious towbars' thread but I think that it is time it got its own thread.
    Introducing my 1975 Turner Ranger tractor! Four wheel drive, four wheel steer, mid mounted 1098 A series in longitudinal configuration (gearbox in sump) but mounted transversely driving the front and rear axles through a Triumph differential. Steering box from an A30/35, hydraulics from a Leyland 154 tractor, drum brakes and rubber cone suspension from a mini. Very small, very unusual and very fun 😀


    I saw this on ebay a few years back and being a mini nut I had to get it. I've used it for light duties since, namely moving trailers and a caravan. Road registered thanks to the Friends of Ferguson Heritage club and absolutely scary to drive on the highway. 

    The history of this design is quite odd. It started off as a Harry Ferguson design through his Ferguson Research company. They were originally designed to run on Calor gas and were sold as Calor Ranger's. Turner Engineering (who made the Calor Ranger's) also started selling the petrol versions badged as Turner Ranger's.
    The rumours are that about 250 were made. Since acquiring one I have become obsessed and have done plenty of searches to find as many survivors as possible. I've found 26 examples (including mine) including one of the original prototypes which has a shorter wheelbase than the production models. I've also found various brochures and literature related to these odd machines.

    Having seen his success on the Invacar thread and the '93 Mondeo thread then I might have to employ the services of @LightBulbFun to work his DVLA magic to find some more examples 🙂
    Also, a few videos of this on my YouTube channel. Just one link below as I don't want to spam you!
     
  16. Like
    vulgalour reacted to D.E in The new news 24 thread   
    Been reading through another early 20th century book on car mechanics I've bought. This one, which has a title that can roughly be translated to "The automobile, handbook for motorists, mechanics and repairmen" is excellent, with lots of advice regarding makeshift roadside repairs, which were often needed 100-odd years ago.
    DIY wheel alignment, 1910s style:

     
  17. Like
    vulgalour reacted to puddlethumper in The new news 24 thread   
    Back in the early 60's there was a young boy, about 9 years old, and every time his parents pissed him off, by not letting him do what he wanted to do, he always said that he would run away and join the circus. Little did this young lad know, that 60 years later, as a pensioner, he would. Yes folks, I'VE JOINED THE CIRCUS. Well, I will actually join on the 29th of this month. 
    This all came about because a mate from daarn saaf visited in his rig and then had brake probs. Took him to a RV specialist I know and arranged to get his rig towed over there. While he was there somebody turned up in a big RV with a traffic on the back. Had a chat with my mate and asked him if he wanted a job. Mate couldn't do it because of health reasons, but he got me a number which I rang a couple of weeks ago. Ivor the boss fella was away for 2 weeks and would give me a ring when he got back. Had almost forgotten about it to be honest, when he rang.
    It's called Circus Vegas and I had the interview this morning at the NEC where Job entails mostly driving, crew minibus, small trucks with trailers, etc from one site to the next and also doing maintenance work when not. I think it's right up my street. Go all over the country, always got lekky and water on site and get paid. It just goes to show, you never know what's round the corner.
     I may have to do a circus shite thread. I'm thinking it might  be a first on the much venerated Autoshite, although I could be wrong. There are those on here who have done some odd stuff.
  18. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from Yoss in The new news 24 thread   
    Back in the paint stripper with this one.  Third coat didn't level out properly and reacted all over.  Didn't do this coat any differently to the second coat, same flatting back, same paint, etc. so I can only assume there's something on this panel that the paint doesn't like.  Bit of a bugger.  I've never had this much trouble with brush-on paint before.  Can't afford to replace it all with the premium stuff and I've got so much of this stuff that I'm just going to persist until it behaves.

    I'm going to do a sample on the car to see if I get a different result.  The pink I've already done didn't react, even when thinned with the same thinner.  The one known difference is that I primed this fuel flap with different paint to what's on the car and I suspect it's that which is causing the reactions.  Sometimes with paint you just have to start again.
    I know, I should just spray the car.  Thing is, the neighbours are too close, I have no clean and covered space I can use to paint in, and I haven't got anywhere to keep even a small compressor.  So brush painting it is.  I've never had this much trouble with it before, the only reason I'm persisting is I know I'm capable of getting really good results with a brush and some time.
  19. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from 320touring in 320touring's major Morris manoeuvrings   
    On the plus side, if you saved the bit of wing that fell off you've already got some plastic to do your own surgery with.
     
     
    In all seriousness, hope you're on the mend and back to fighting form soon.  Also, why do the dampers have fins?  It can't be for cooling, surely.
  20. Like
    vulgalour reacted to 320touring in 320touring's major Morris manoeuvrings   
    Time for an update on this:
    The rebuilt fuel pump from @blackboilersuit was attached the other day, and the bloody thing now fires up sweetly and promptly. Many thanks again to him for his efforts!
    Bouyed by this success, I decided to splash out..

    Behold, a plethora of Oxford parts.
    A plan was formed. Many thanks to @jaypee and @Supernaut for their help today.
     
    GSA into the corner of the unit, Oxford into the centre.
    We decided to start at the back
     
    First up - tighten the rearmost exhaust mount - a blasphemous 10mm fitting..
    Next. Try to see if we could get the spring shackle bushes out. That would be a no.  First one we tried unbolted fine, but the threaded pin would not come out. Discretion being the better part of valour, we put it back together.
    Then onto brakes.
    I'd ordered cylinders and adjusters plus fitting springs, expecting the worst.
    On pulling the first drum off, I was pleasantly surprised:

    Plenty of meat on the shoes, wheel cylinder was dry and the adjuster was free.
    Everything was cleaned down, the drum sanded on the inside (no noticeable lip) then reassembled.
    Footbrake pressed to centre the shoes and the adjuster set so the drum was locked at 3 clicks.
    The other side was exactly the same - so nice to work on well designed drum brakes.
     
    Then it was time to look at the rear hydraulics:
    The rear hard lines and the "T-piece" are all in good condition - no major rust and the unions themselves are clean.
    This flexi, however, was not. Luckily a new one had been procured and was duly fitted


    We topped up the master cylinder in the drivers footwell and hit the bleed nipples with remonstrating fluid.
    Both responded positively to the application of a spanner, and the rear brakes bled up easily.
     
    Having spent some time crawling about under the car, it was obvious the rear end would benefit greatly from some cleaning, rust treatment and underseal.
    @Supernaut deployed the wire brush of truth and did an excellent job getting the loose underseal off.
    I then became enamored with the idea of removing the dampers to clean and paint them.
    @jaypee's patience was key here as the top nuts were quite difficult to access.
    Once off, it was obvious they were in need of some love

    The lump at the right are actually fins.. so much gear oil and grease had filled them in.

    You can see them clearly here
     
    Once cleaned and wire brushed, they were treated with Vactan, then primed.

    I don't know what colour they will be once painted🤣
    The rest of the afternoon was spent cleaning the rear end. The task was mountainous in its size..

    Still more to do!
  21. Like
    vulgalour got a reaction from puddlethumper in The new news 24 thread   
    Back in the paint stripper with this one.  Third coat didn't level out properly and reacted all over.  Didn't do this coat any differently to the second coat, same flatting back, same paint, etc. so I can only assume there's something on this panel that the paint doesn't like.  Bit of a bugger.  I've never had this much trouble with brush-on paint before.  Can't afford to replace it all with the premium stuff and I've got so much of this stuff that I'm just going to persist until it behaves.

    I'm going to do a sample on the car to see if I get a different result.  The pink I've already done didn't react, even when thinned with the same thinner.  The one known difference is that I primed this fuel flap with different paint to what's on the car and I suspect it's that which is causing the reactions.  Sometimes with paint you just have to start again.
    I know, I should just spray the car.  Thing is, the neighbours are too close, I have no clean and covered space I can use to paint in, and I haven't got anywhere to keep even a small compressor.  So brush painting it is.  I've never had this much trouble with it before, the only reason I'm persisting is I know I'm capable of getting really good results with a brush and some time.
  22. Thanks
    vulgalour reacted to Zelandeth in The new news 24 thread   
    This is what happened to me and is why the paint finish on 2/3rds of TPA is so awful.  Switched primer between two jobs (because the stuff I'd used before was no longer stocked locally), and it reacted horribly.  It also proved to be immune to thinners or paint stripper...and mechanically removing it from a fibreglass base proved basically impossible as it had a stronger bond to the fibreglass than the fibreglass did to itself.  It also turned out to immediately clog sanding discs/paper etc as soon as you so much as walked near to it.
    Still kicking myself for not just leaving it alone as I wound up with a far worse result than I started out with.
  23. Like
    vulgalour reacted to puddlethumper in The new news 24 thread   
    Yay! New mot.  A couple of piddly advisories. Another year on the road for the old heap. 
  24. Like
    vulgalour reacted to Schaefft in Schaefft's Bargain Barge Extravaganza - NEW CAR - It's already screwed   
    Yeah, it's incredible what a few years of practically abondoning a car can do to it.
    To quickly finish the green E38 interior mission: Backseat went back in, better condition and no broken center armrest lid. Sold the backrest pieces for 10 quid. Believe it or not, the cupholder in the old bottom cushion is worth 60 quid on its own, so basically a free repair.

    I've also replaced the center console trim as the old one was cracked. It comes apart fairly easily if you know how:
    #
    Plenty of filrth inside that I had to clean out...

    Major improvement, the cracked shifter was replaced at the same time. Once again I can sell the old ashtray, armrest and cubby hole to make my money back.

    The passenger side dash trim was replaced to have a fully matching set as well (see the difference in the first pic). 


    That only leaves the door trim and cupholder left to replace for now. I paid 200 quid for all interior pieces, I should be able to get most of that back by selling what can be reused.
    On the Toyota Celsior side: It runs again!🎉
    After reinstalling the valve covers with new gaskets and sealant I've installed the starter and tested it just to make sure that I wouldn't spent hours reassembling things without actually working. Fortunately the car now started to crank over, thank god, anything else would have meant complete misery really. I've replaced the knock sensors while in there, each of which was obscenely priced despite being aftermarket and coming from Rockauto...

    I've used this gasket kit specifically provided to dealers for a starter repair on an LS400, I got lucky and somehow found it on Ebay after reading the dealer instructions for doing the job in a random pdf I've dug up online, it had the part number in it, a part number that I don't think was ever made available to the public. To anyone finding this thread via google in 10 years time: 04007-06350 . You are welcome.

    It came with everything I needed, plus a few extra gaskets for the EGR tube that (as it turns out) was not a thing on early Japanese market Celsiors. Which is a blessing as the EGR tubes are an absolute pain to replace, running down the back of the engine. I still have all the holes for the port drilled into the intake manifold but all of them are sealed off internally, pretty interesting.

    Slowly putting it all back together, it's certainly an unusual intake manifold design.

    And done (minus all the beauty covers). I refilled the coolant, checked for coolant and fuel leaks, couldn't find any so I thought it was safe to start the car.

    Unfortunately I didn't take a video but the car started up almost instantly.🥳 Huge relief there as it meant that I can finally move it out of the way. However, since things went too well oil started pouring out from underneath the passenger side valve cover. Turns out one of the half moon shaped blanking caps Toyota also liked to use on their V8s (instead of a second camshaft coming out of the head) somehow got misaligned, causing the mating surface of the gasket to be slightly uneven. It's pretty interesting how much oil can pour out of a non-pressurized part of the engine...

    Removed the valve cover again, spent an hour cleaning the sealant off everything, reinstalled it, hoping that it will all be sorted tomorrow when dry and I can move the car. Photo above was from the first try, it looks perfectly even there... On a side note, the replacement sparkplug tube seals were so tight that it shaved the rubber off of them while pressing them in:

    At this point I replaced almost every component that would ever realistically break on this engine, minus the waterpump and timing belt. I sure hope that this means that this is the end of my engine woes and the car will behave from now on... I'll probably get it on my multi-car policy and book it in for an MOT soon then...
    New arrival from Glasgow next week! It will only stay for a short time as I think it really is too far gone this time...
  25. Haha
    vulgalour got a reaction from wuvvum in The new news 24 thread   
    That's the most Scottish thing I've seen in quite some time.
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