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meshking

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  1. Like
    meshking reacted to worldofceri in The World. As seen by Ceri.   
    Just over two years ago (at the time of writing) I left my job.  I was working for DHL, driving a lorry on a distribution contract for Network Rail. It was reasonably well paid, reasonably unstressful work and I enjoyed it;  But working for a large company, as most of us know, has it’s frustrations.  You get to know what is right with the job, and you know what is wrong with it.  But all those little things that are wrong will never change, and they irk after a while.  So you can either be philosophical about it and crack on, or you can become belligerent and moan incessantly about it to anyone who will listen.  Many lorry drivers are great at this.
    Or, you can move on and do something else.  I’d been daydreaming for months, probably years, about going it alone and working for myself.  One day my wife said to me – not unreasonably – that it was about time I either got on and did it, or stopped banging on about it.  Around the same time someone offered to lend me a little bit of money, and I found myself running out of excuses to procrastinate.
    This is the story of what I did next.  Part shite-spotting thread, part shameless advertisement feature and part indulgent personal blog.
    Or that’s the intention.  Hopefully I’ll be able to keep it up, and may even catch up with myself one day.
    World of Ceri.  June 2020.
  2. Like
    meshking reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    It's been a while. I've not done a huge amount since the lurgey got out because I've been working/home schooling/trying to finish houses/trying to be Capability Sodding Brown. However, someone else has been working largely interupted by having to do any proper work so progress has been brisk.
    We left the hubs somewhere near machined. However, there is a lot of things to get inthe right place around these so here is a hub sitting on a dummy axle trying to work out what will go where. It should be pretty clear now what goes where. The straight edge is giving the line of the chain. The brake drum/sprocket bolts to the inside flange and the wheel to the out flange.
     

    And if the wheel is to be bolted on then you need some wheel studs. So someone had to stand in front of the lathe making 20 of the buggers.

    And you also need a brake drum. These were cast originally but mainly because machining the sprocket on would be expensive we have fabricated our ones. You won't be able to see them when they are on. Here is the rolled drum with the flame cut mounting flange.

    Then I missed a load of photos as the drum was bored out, the mounting flange machined and fitted then a mountain of weld piled in joining the two together. So here is a big jump to a welded up and partially machined drum being fitted to the hub.

    But the drum also needs some spikey bits for the chain to snag on. These were water jet cut a couple of years back but they needed popped in the big lathe to bore them out to size.

    Then once it is at the right size it can be slipped onto the drum ready for welding. This amount of welding tends to pull things all over the shop so there is plenty of machining allowance should anything not end up in the right place. The bit of pipe is temporary. It comes out once everything is welded. The reason that the drum overhangs the sprocket is to form a groove to catch the oil off the chain. Without this the oil runs onto the brake drum and doesn't help slow you down.

    Then you need an axle. Here is the second axle. The first bit of bar that was ordered as about 8" to short. You have to laugh, eh? We have to machine it like this because the big Swift is very big but the spindle bore is not big enough to take the axle.

    Another view of a long and heavy bit of bar.

    And once you have it turned down you can put it all together like this. Surprisingly it slipped together very easily so something must have gone right. A brand new Super Sentinel rear axle. Not too many people built one of these.
     
    In all this progress someone got bored and painted a lathe. They aren't DSG's but these Swifts are really nice to work with.

    And here is a front hub cap all machined and milled so your feet don't slip off them.

    Oh, and while we are at the front axle, what's missing?

    That's right. It's these bloody things which are going back for the second time because they are still not right. However, it was our fault they were wrong this time. I thought the front axle was very close to the ground.

    As well as front hub caps you need some for the rear. We had a pattern made for these because it was going to be too much of a pain to fabricate them.

    And the other cap sitting where it is meant to be. This assembly is very, very heavy.

    A pair of boiler clack valves (non-return valves) machined with their seats, valves and spindles in place. These let water from the feed pump and injector pass into the boiler.

    And this is the bottle that smooths out the flow from the water pump. This had one or two cracks in it from frost damage so it was brazed up and made to look pretty. It will be painted black.

    And Vintage Wings and Radiators made a pair of rear wings for us.

    With the correct swoopy trailing edge so they look all fast and high performance.

    And finally here is the S4 all back together and ready to go again.

    Incidentally I know I tend to rush through these things but I assume that most people don't give much of a toss about the finer points of lining up the drive sprockets. If there is anything you want to know more about just ask. Do understand that the answer might start to get a bit dull.
  3. Like
    meshking reacted to Zelandeth in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Jag, Citroen, Mercedes & AC Model 70 - 06/08 - Minor Invacar Bodywork Fettling & A Proper Test Drive   
    I may well go down that road, just feels kind of like cheating given getting rid of flexible lines was one of my main targets!  I know it's not the same thing, but it's the principle of the thing!  I'll get it sorted one way or another...it's a relatively low priority right now as what's there works...it just isn't ideal.
     
    Yesterday I had a few things turn up in the post.

    In here we have:
    [] 1/4" EPDM hose to replace the leaky brake fluid reservoir to master cylinder lines on the Jag.
    [] Afterburner Heater Control kit for the van.
    [] A Series 1 Ford Ka dash clock just because I've always liked the design and I stumbled across one on eBay for £0.99 and fancy sticking one in a nice little case to put on my desk.
     
    Our first task was to do the brake feed line on the Jag as it seemed a pretty simple job.
    This is the overcomplicated mess that was on the Jag when I started out.

    Small stubs of hose coming off the reservoir (I don't imagine the orange hoses are original), which then feed onto steel lines, before jumping to fabric braided hoses (which do look original) which connect on to the stubs on the master cylinder itself.
    Looking closer the hose ends being the source of the leak was evidenced by the fact there was brake fluid running down the cable ties which I'd used to help stem the leaks a few days ago.

    My intention was to do away with the metal lines entirely here...There are eight potential points of failure here rather than four.  So this lot came out.

    With that destined for the bin (figuratively speaking...those metal lines will be cleaned up and definitely stuffed into the "box of potentially useful things" for future use), this is what replaced it.


    I've sleeved the one where it's just sitting on the air cleaner housing since the photo was taken,  I don't think it's likely to be a problem, but best to be sure.
    Why Jaguar didn't just do this originally rather than messing about with those metal lines I've no idea.  So far "because Jaguar" is the best I've got!  While it's obviously not, I think this looks a lot more "stock" than it did.
    Interestingly given that this didn't involve actually interfering with the brake system (I had the pedal held down while the hoses were changed), suddenly the car brakes a lot more evenly!  It's always had quite a pull to the left on braking since I picked it up...but now it does it far less!  So yeah...a full system bleed through definitely needs to happen sooner rather than later.
    The Afterburner, in case you haven't heard of it is a replacement for the ones that these Chinese diesel heaters ship with.  While the heaters themselves aren't actually bad the controllers are...sub par.  This came to the attention of an engineer over in Australia who decided that this was a ridiculous situation, and took it upon himself to "build a better mousetrap" as it were.  He reverse-engineered the communication protocol used by the heater and the stock controller and basically built a better one.  In doing so (the design has been refined over a few years) has allowed in addition to far better basic control of the heater, addition of a far richer feature set including wi-fi connectivity, timers, frost protection modes, several GPIO channels which you can access, a humidistat, and a proper high quality temperature monitoring head.
    The details can be found over on the designer/maker's page here.
    Looking at the back of the PCB it's immediately obvious that an engineer is behind this thing...Immediately obvious and labelled programming/debugging headers and a plethora of status lights blinking away at you.

    When you initially hook it up you need to attach it along with the original controller (there's a socket on the harness for that purpose) to download the unit specific fuel tuning data from the original controllers.  This is clearly documented in the instructions that came with the unit and took all of about 30 seconds.  After this is done and the power is turned off the original controller can be unplugged and removed.  I gave the system a good test with the controller just lashed up to make sure everything was behaving, got the network set up etc.

    In these days where more and more devices hide away as much data from the end user as possible the data this little screen is willing to show you with one button press is refreshing...and has that look of "yeah, an engineer has put this together."

    Quite a bit of data here...so here's the run down.
    Doing this left-to-right unless otherwise stated.
    Top row: Wi-Fi signal strength (it also shows additional network status messages there when relevant).  Current time.  System voltage & battery charge state.
    Middle: Current running mode.
    Bottom row: Current room temperature.  Target room temperature (also shown by the arrow on the thermometer graphic on the left).  Fan speed.  Fuel pump rate in Hz.  Fuel used since last reset.  Current burner case temperature.
    In recognition of the fact that everyone doesn't want to see all of this all the time, the home screen can be set to show either the current room temperature or the current time as shown below.


    In addition to the data which the main system display can show in person...having this hooked up to your Wi-Fi network means that there's the ability to get data out of it that way.  There is actually a web server running on there which you can access from anywhere on your network.

    This gives you the ability to turn the heater on/off, change modes, adjust the thermostat etc remotely...which is pretty cool.  You can access all the stuff from the GPIO ports as well, so the ability exists to turn things on and off in the van remotely as well if hooked up to this.

    The Afterburner runs an access point as well, so if you're away from home you can still hook up to it with your phone etc to get into this interface - probably the most useful item there is the priming option as that's a bit buried in the menus on the actual unit, and is something that you might want to access while standing on your head wherever the heater itself is buried in your van.  In mine it's quite a ways from the controller.
    Quite cool.
    Having it working hanging out of the spot where I'd had the original controller was one thing...however I wanted to actually get it neatly integrated, ideally where the original heater control for the gas fired heater was.  That looked like this by the way, why I chose the black and red enclosure for the new one as a nod to originality.

    Getting this in was always going to be a bit of a pig of a job. 
    I need to get the cable from the hole down in the locker under the bed to the hole in the wall behind the driver's head.

    This sadly wasn't as simple as dropping something in there and fishing it out.  Firstly the plug I needed to get through was bigger than the holes, so they were always going to need to be enlarged a bit...secondly it had to come up from the bottom as the other end is tethered to the heater body.
    This was made far more difficult I discovered because there is hollow fibre insulation material in the wall so even if you drop something in there it won't fall all the way down.  I was able to with a bit of swearing and attaching a weight to the end of a bit of wire to get it about 3/4 of the way down but that was the best I could do.  So I had to cut an access hole to get my hand in there.

    You can see here the red wire going in the top and out the bottom - I wedged a bit of pipe I found laying around in the locker on there as a weight.

    I wasn't too bothered about this...it's in the locker so a functional cover doesn't need to be too pretty.  Plus this is where I'll have a junction box fitted to break out the GPIO connections in the future anyway.
    I was then able to hook the heater loom onto this wire and drag it back up through the wall cavity (after enlarging the hole very slightly so it will fit).

    Bingo!
    Then it was a simple matter of attaching the new controller to the wall.  Oh...and figuring out where to put the room thermostat.  I had a brainwave at this point, remembering that when I upgraded the thermostats in the house to wireless programmable ones I kept hold of the housings that the sensor heads used to live in.  Being made to house a temperature probe they would obviously be designed to handle airflow correctly etc...and being from 1981 when our house was built, would look at home in the van.
    Temperature probe fitted nicely across it lengthways.

    With the cover refitted I think this looks absolutely like it could be original to the van.

    The base could do with a splash of black paint at some point, but I'll worry about that at some point down the line.  It looks smart enough I think.  Especially from a distance I think that I've achieved the sort of "it could be stock" look I was aiming for.

    One of the GPIO inputs I will be wiring to a switch in the cab as a simple override to turn the heater on, the other I will probably hook up to a float switch as a low fuel cut off.  Not major features, but "nice to haves" I'll look to add down the road.
    I've probably waffled on about the Afterburner more than enough here already, but if you've got and questions about it please feel free to ask.  I think this will be a really nice addition to the van.
     
    Last little project for the evening was to track down the connector wiring for that Ford clock.  Didn't take long to find, so I'll look at getting a case made up for that somewhere down the road.  For now...here's an example of one of the worst examples of backlighting of instrumentation in a modern car.

    Trying to read this while driving at night is like trying to do a crossword while riding a unicycle.  I still like it though, and look forward to it living on my desk.  The dim backlighting there will work well as it won't be annoying at night.
    Lordy that turned into a bit of a long post!
  4. Like
    meshking reacted to RobT in The new news 24 thread   
    Yet again, I've been proved wrong.  Yesterday I found a NOS condenser in the Metro's glove box which I'd forgotten about.  Lobbed it in the Morris today and whoosh!  Running like clockwork again.  No missing under load and feels more eager too.  Hopefully that's sorted now and I can move on to other jobs.  Quite fancy getting the tyres fitted next.
    I celebrated with a photo.

  5. Thanks
    meshking reacted to RobT in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    This will be so good when finished.  Mind you, looks great already.
  6. Thanks
    meshking reacted to 320touring in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Love the updates on this - good job!
  7. Thanks
    meshking reacted to brownnova in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Excellent colour choice! It’s going to be really lovely when it’s done! 
  8. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Joey spud in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  9. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Mr Laurence in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  10. Like
    meshking reacted to RobT in The new news 24 thread   
    The fleet have been fighting me lately.  Some habitual incompetence on my part hasn't helped the situation.
    The Morris is still running weird, so I've bought a NOS Lucas distributor in case the old one is knackered.  There's only so many times I can blame points and condensers.  It'll benefit from having the timing set no doubt, so I'll get myself a timing light rather than rely on random tweaks of the dizzy.
    The 11 has carb problems, which I'm hoping to sort with a used replacement.  Bigger issue is this appeared.

    I'd taken the carb off previously and replaced the broken choke rod (£12.81 fix FTW) but now the auto 'box warning light of doom has appeared, and the two must be related.  Too much of a coincidence I reckon, and it was fine beforehand.  Done loads of checks on wiring etc but still ongoing.  Bloody typical too as I'd decided to sell it, as I've no room for it sadly.  Or rather no undercover storage which ideally it needs.  I also think the bonnet hinges are suffering from fatigue, but seeing these two together perked me up.

    The Cavalier boiled over on me today. This one was pure incompetence as I forgot to put the expansion cap back on after topping up the water.  Conveniently placed so it jammed the bonnet shut.

    Got there in the end.  Phew!  Normal service resumed.
    Taxed the Metro today, but on reflection I daren't even touch that at the moment...
  11. Like
    meshking got a reaction from LightBulbFun in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  12. Like
    meshking got a reaction from brownnova in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  13. Like
    meshking reacted to 320touring in 320Touring's 1993 SEAT Toledo- Clutch cable change05/08/2020   
    Today, I decided to try and do some bodywork and undersealing on the Toledo:

    Supplies gathered, I started with the drivers front wing:

    Sandpaper and a screwdriver got the loose stuff off


    whilst that vactan was drying, it was onto the drivers door:


    Drivers rear door and rear arch:


    This hole is right in the middle of the door:(

     
    I turned it round - literally nothing to do!

    Then it was onto the sills:
    Drivers side

    happily it's very solid, bar the small rough section in the above picture.
    Usual Vactan and Underseal approach applied


    Then the passenger's side:

    Despite this looking a little rough, it's solid so I was most pleased

    I wirebrushed the hell out it (and my arm)

    Vactan and Underseal added as per the other side.
    Pleased with what I got done, and glad it seems really solid:)
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  14. Thanks
    meshking reacted to Skizzer in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Cracking progress on this and love the colour - 736/10.
  15. Like
    meshking got a reaction from 320touring in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  16. Like
    meshking got a reaction from RobT in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  17. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Tickman in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    My finger injury has recovered enough now to wear gloves.
    Earlier I had cut a plate to fit

    Got busy with the welder this morning:

    It'll do.  Also bought some vactan alternative and went to work on the goal posts:



    Time will tell how good it is I suppose
  18. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Saabnut in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  19. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Tickman in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  20. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Skizzer in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    My finger injury has recovered enough now to wear gloves.
    Earlier I had cut a plate to fit

    Got busy with the welder this morning:

    It'll do.  Also bought some vactan alternative and went to work on the goal posts:



    Time will tell how good it is I suppose
  21. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Ian_Fearn in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
  22. Like
    meshking got a reaction from egg in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    My finger injury has recovered enough now to wear gloves.
    Earlier I had cut a plate to fit

    Got busy with the welder this morning:

    It'll do.  Also bought some vactan alternative and went to work on the goal posts:



    Time will tell how good it is I suppose
  23. Like
    meshking got a reaction from egg in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Having recovered, slightly, from my finger injury I took another look at the bulkhead. I had noticed this plate before, doesn't look particularly factory:

     
    So I unclipped the accelerator cable to find the tension of the cable was holding in two pieces of steel either side of a rusty hole
     

     
    Not too keen on rusty holes, and definitely not keen on just painting over it. Look alike the welder is coming out again tomorrow....
  24. Like
    meshking got a reaction from anonymous user in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    My finger injury has recovered enough now to wear gloves.
    Earlier I had cut a plate to fit

    Got busy with the welder this morning:

    It'll do.  Also bought some vactan alternative and went to work on the goal posts:



    Time will tell how good it is I suppose
  25. Like
    meshking got a reaction from Skizzer in 1980 Citroën acadiane   
    Snuck in some time on the van this weekend. Decided it was about time to start painting and accepting that it's never going to be show quality. 

    First up, sort the bonnet. The final prime the van side:

    Now get the rustoleum out and paint!

    fairly happy. It was a new gun and I don't think I thinned the paint sufficiently. Hopefully it'll buff up nicely.
    On Saturday I also got fed up with the dirty seats. I had pulled these out of the van when I replaced the floor and left them in my dumping ground (or conservatory as it is known elsewhere). This meant that my cats had become rather partial to sleeping on them and they were then shoved into the garage when building works started last year. 
    Hoovered and used some upholstery cleaner gave this half way through:

    Both seats are now done, making the interior hopefully a much nice place to be!
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