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Joey spud

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  1. Like
    Joey spud reacted to worldofceri in Lazy spotters thread   
    Spotted today in Gibraltar.
    SEAT       
    (LICENCIA FIAT)



  2. Like
    Joey spud reacted to puddlethumper in Lazy spotters thread   
    I thought this Moggy was on a 4x4 chassis so I had a quick look underneath. Nope, not 4x4.

  3. Like
    Joey spud reacted to D.E in Lazy spotters thread   
    Could go in the abandoned cars thread as well...


  4. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from myglaren in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    I have had an old fluid extractor thing for years and its never held a vacuum so to drain anything you had to pump away like a demented person.
    So the other day i fitted a check valve in to the suction pipe so i could build up and hold vacuum in its reservoir and now it's working like a champ as ably demonstrated by removing half a litre of oily muck from of a mobile tyre vans little piston compressor.
    Happy days...

  5. Like
    Joey spud reacted to EmperorPigeon in EmperorPigeon's Enfield 8000 restoration project   
    Back in late March and early April thanks to a tip off from @Mrs6C, I negotiated a price for the pictured Enfield 8000 four seater (yes one of the two that exist ). I offered £800, seller countered with £850 and the man maths said "yes!" and it was still a discount over the £1k asking price.
    Since then it has been a bit of a slog getting updates. The seller would find himself busy with life and it did feel that the car and our deal was on the back burner. The chassis, as of April, was "solid" with just the front wishbone driver side suspension arm needing replacing which was finally completed a few days ago, thanks to having a real deadline with myself having arranged the courier (the seller had promised to sort out collection and delivery, but it was clear it wasn't happening). Still, in fairness, the work was completed at no extra cost to myself, and I look forward to taking delivery of the car Tuesday morning. When it arrives I'll be back here with a proper assessment and many a photo and/or video. I have also had a great deal of support and encouragement from @Will on Syrosbehind the scenes in PMs.
    I did make it clear when negotiating that my budget was not high, it would be my first car, everything was going to be done cheaply and on my driveway. That budget was £2000 and that is a budget that no longer exists at that amount, so expect to see some things of worth being placed in the appropriate thread from my good self to support the habit go into the battlechest. I don't expect a huge amount of work will be able to be done given the time of year, but I will keep you all apprised.
    Weather permitting come Tuesday morning, once the car has arrived I will give the car a clean inside and out as I like to have a clean and tidy working area. Otherwise it'll be moving the soft furnishings and vulnerable interior components inside, along with the spares (I have no idea what the spares will be, these will be documented in a later post). I already have a good idea on how I'm going to go about the restoration, however I'm holding off talking about most of that until I see the car for myself. One thing is the paint. I don't have the money for a professional respray, so I'm going the Not2grand DIY route. I've had a lot of experience with spray paints and with proper prep work, it'll look decent and far better than she does now. Verona BMW red is too expensive (it would be though wouldn't it?) so I'm going with Signal Red because Flame Red is too dark/doesn't feel right. Tubular steel and such is dirt cheap and I have a nearby supplier just 8 miles away and they do delivery - I can even get aluminium and tin from them which will be necessary.
    Most people will parrot "traction batteries!" but I'm not paying £1500. I'll take some measurements and go down the route of 8 12v 130-150ah batteries that will cost about £500. As an aside, the brochures/advertisements for the E8000 list the main battery pack as being 8 12v batteries, which I'll configure to be a 48v 260-300ah pack depending on the batteries I get and the space available.  Furthermore, each E8000 was different and various battery configurations were experimented with during production and later by the Electricity Council. I'll be making a cardboard mock-up first and buying replacement cabling and lugs so as to have everything properly measured and relatively straightforward. The onboard charger will be ignored in favour of a Mean Well 48v PSU going into a solar charge controller. That or a Meanwell charger, price permitting. It wouldn't be fast but then I wouldn't be driving every day or going beyond a 20-25 mile round trip. Taking into account the Peukhert effect with what the motor would demand at full power (150amps, or 7.2kw/6kw to the drive wheels at roughly 83.25% efficiency), such a battery pack (12.48kw to 14.4kw depending on what fits the physical space and that I can afford) it would probably be reduced to 9-12kw depending on the pack size. Noting that if I went with a 150ah battery pack it would be reduced to 75ah capacity at full draw, but the bigger the battery pack the less of an impact. I just need not to drive around like a lunatic.
    Also until its done, this is all theory and speculation and I look forward to finding out the real statistics for my particular setup.
    Lastly,  it should be clear as well  is that this isn't going to be the next Flux Capacitor, very little if any restomodding will occur (although I have a couple of subtle ideas), and I will be cutting corners where I can to get the car functional, relatively reasonable to look at, and roadworthy. As an aside to those that will be annoyed by my approach: the car had been up for sale back in late 2019 when the previous seller bought it, then up for sale since January 2021 until March when the advert was taken down and it was after that when I started my enquiries, so many a chance to make a deal before I did. That said, I know from the various threads I've been lurking in here that most of you are reasonable and understanding.

    So here's to an enjoyable-as-possible restoration project!  

  6. Like
    Joey spud reacted to Dick Longbridge in EmperorPigeon's Enfield 8000 restoration project   
    Wow, another one! Great to see and kudos for biting the bullet with it. 
    Have you seen this photo of it in happier times? 
     

  7. Like
    Joey spud reacted to Dick Longbridge in Slang names for cars   
    Back in the 1990s I owned what transpired to be a unicorn poop rare RHD 2 door Mk1 Jetta. 
    Bored one day, I hacked up a couple of spare mk1 Golf badges I had lying around, along with the Jetta bootlid badge. When finished, my car proudly wore its GoGetta badge for the remainder of my ownership. It actually looked almost OEM too. 
  8. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from Remspoor in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    I have had an old fluid extractor thing for years and its never held a vacuum so to drain anything you had to pump away like a demented person.
    So the other day i fitted a check valve in to the suction pipe so i could build up and hold vacuum in its reservoir and now it's working like a champ as ably demonstrated by removing half a litre of oily muck from of a mobile tyre vans little piston compressor.
    Happy days...

  9. Like
  10. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from GrumpiusMaximus in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    I have had an old fluid extractor thing for years and its never held a vacuum so to drain anything you had to pump away like a demented person.
    So the other day i fitted a check valve in to the suction pipe so i could build up and hold vacuum in its reservoir and now it's working like a champ as ably demonstrated by removing half a litre of oily muck from of a mobile tyre vans little piston compressor.
    Happy days...

  11. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from LightBulbFun in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    I have had an old fluid extractor thing for years and its never held a vacuum so to drain anything you had to pump away like a demented person.
    So the other day i fitted a check valve in to the suction pipe so i could build up and hold vacuum in its reservoir and now it's working like a champ as ably demonstrated by removing half a litre of oily muck from of a mobile tyre vans little piston compressor.
    Happy days...

  12. Like
    Joey spud reacted to vulgalour in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Video time.  Words and pictures to follow when I get chance.
     
  13. Like
    Joey spud reacted to Minimad5 in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Thanks !
    No really, as I'm considering buying a loom for the P4, but wasn't sure what sort of quality etc it would be.
    Still think this is a brilliant looking motor. 
  14. Like
    Joey spud reacted to vulgalour in 1951 Lanchester LD10   
    Wiring part one, do check out the video above because it makes more sense of it than the words and pictures do.  This is a very three dimensional sort of a job.  We'd already identified that the only inoperative items on the car were the interior light and the horns.  The interior light was probably dirty contacts, the horns were because they were dead so replacements were acquired that work.  The decision had already been made to get a new harness which is available off the shelf from www.autosparks.co.uk to factory specification.  More on that later.  The trouble Pat and I were facing with the Lanchester is that the various electrical items on the car were becoming temperamental and, in some cases, totally inoperative.  We knew the wiring was bad and we now had a new wiring loom to go in.  What we didn't know for definite was the physical wiring route.  Much of this is a one-person job, unfortunately, by its nature.  I'd had more time free than Pat so I got the lion's share of all the grubby work getting the old wiring out.  To give you some idea of what we're working with, here's a look at the state of play.  The big knob to the left is the cowl fresh air vent, the round thing behind with the white handles is the heater box, and to the right is the steering column, this is all underneath the dashboard.

    A lot of the wiring uses bullet connectors for the various sections.  Some are in reasonable health, many aren't, and some of the new wiring goes into old bullet connectors to join up to the old wiring.  The new stuff is the plain colour, the old is the one with the neat zigzag patterning.


    It's not pretty.  What's worse, there's been a lot of confusion for Pat and I due to a previous owner's modification to the wiring and with very little in the way of photographs to compare with what's on our car it has taken a while to figure out what's going on.  When the video was recorded we had a rough idea, now that we're a lot further on in this job we have a much better idea of what's going on.  What we can't make sense of is why it was done this way when there was a far simpler solution.  I digress.  The little white choc-bloc thing isn't original and what the wires are doing going in and out of it isn't original either.  That also means that up at the voltage regulator where the two fuses for the wiring live, connections there aren't exactly as they ought to be either.  This is in the engine bay on the driver's side, just above the steering column.


    That mass of wiring goes through the bulkhead to join up with the spaghetti in the cabin. Here you can see it draped over the steering column.  Pat and I suspect this is an unfinished job and it may be that whoever started it planned to remove all of the wiring and were working through a section at a time.  We'll likely never actually know.

    Luckily, much of our guess work is taken out by the new harness.  Unluckily quite a lot of new guess work is put in because the new harness doesn't come with labelling or instructions, diagrams, or any indication of what section is for what beyond a wire colour decoder on Autosparks' website.  We're told this is normal because it's OEM replacement and since this is our first venture into this sort of thing we have no experience to tell us otherwise.  If we were replacing an original harness this likely would have been less of a problem, as it is it created quite a headache.

    We have opted to have wiring added for flasher relays and a power outlet, our only concessions to modernity.  The front sidelights will become combination sidelight-indicators since there are magic bulbs that do that now, and we'll have some hidden brake and indicator lights at the back, probably in the rear window so it's at eye height for the modern driver.  We'll be retaining the functionality of the semaphores and the car will look exactly as it does now, it will just be that little bit safer in modern traffic.  These additions are the only labelled items on the new harness, but at least that removes a little confusion for us.

    After an embarrassingly long time of laying out the new harness and trying to figure out what went where I had to admit defeat.  I couldn't figure out what exactly was supposed to go where physically on the car and, not knowing the actual route of the wiring, the lengths of the new harness weren't really giving me any clues.  Best bet, I decided, was to just start removing the old harness and go from there, it would be easier with both harnesses side by side and if I labelled as I went confusion should be minimised.

    In the engine bay again, the other area of the bulkhead where the wiring pops out is on the passenger side.  The lower wiring nips out alongside the washer bottle a previous owner fitted to our car, it didn't have one of those when new.  Nor did it have the fuel filter.  This wire I'm pointing at feeds the oil pressure sender and the coil.



    I had to clip off the connectors on the wires to get it through the P-clip that holds the wire and pull it through into the cabin.

    This is because the P-clip bolt is obscured by the fuel filter and the fuel filter is a two-person job to remove unless you've got longer arms than I have.  When the filter was fitted, the fitter didn't make the nuts captive in any way and I don't have a long enough spanner or ratchet combo in the relevant size to wedge and use as a second pair of hands.  Also, Pat wasn't available and I don't need the connectors on the old harness anyway since we're replacing it all.  Work smarter, not harder.  Next then was to figure out how to safely and carefully remove the wiring.  I don't know how to draw proper wiring diagrams (yet) so I just drew what I saw as reference.  This actually worked out really well for me later when making more accurate diagrams.  I used what colours I saw and labelled as I went, removing one wire at a time.

    This then left the voltage regulator connector thingy looking a lot more empty.

    After pulling the wires through into the cabin that needed to go that way, and leaving the others in the engine bay, I had a colourful selection of tagged wires.  I then bundled the wires together that had been together previously to keep some semblance of order to the harness to hopefully help in decyphering later.  This is what you might call painstaking and I'm sure some folks would have just happily pulled everything out and thrown it away.  Because Pat and I are doing this basically for the first time, we thought more caution was better, especially since we haven't a deadline to meet. "VR" for Voltage Regulator and the number to indicate which location it is on the block, 1 being at the top.  The wiring diagram labels it differently to this, I did it this way so I could understand it and kept the same labelling throughout all my diagrams, at least that way my diagrams wouldn't confuse me.


    Back inside the cabin again (there was a lot of getting in and out of the car to do this job) I could now look for more of the wiring and see how it should be routed better.  Some of the original wiring was still in place and I could see it should be secured tidily under the dashboard in more P-clips.  I do show the route a bit more clearly in the video, it's difficult to capture here in static photos.  I am also building a physical layout diagram for the wiring which will be freely available to help other Lanchester owners decypher the job on their cars since it was pretty much impossible to find that information when trying to do it on ours.

    That bit of the harness I'm pointing at above is behind the passenger glovebox, it branches off and exits the bulkhead into the engine bay again for the wiper motor.  What I didn't know is that you can disconnect these wires without removing the wiper motor, but it looks like someone has had the motor off before and when it was reinstalled the wires were tucked in such a way that it wasn't clear whether or not the motor had to be removed.  The motor comes out by undoing just two nuts inside the car, or in our case one nut because one was missing and looks to have been missing for quite some time.

    I then basically had the whole of the dashboard wiring disconnected as well as any of the wiring that went from the dashboard to the outside of the car.  It was looking considerably tidier. Having the wiring out of the car highlighted how bad some of the connections really were.  The old wiring is very brittle and the insulation quite fragile in a lot of places.

    The heater box was also removed, on our car that meant disconnecting the two water pipes in the engine bay, and undoing the three nuts.  We could then disconnect the two wires and remove the whole unit.  The core of the heater has failed so it needs repairing which we'll get done when we finally get the radiator done, probably at Bryans since they're local-ish and highly recommended.

    The interior was looking considerably tidier now.  I should mention at this point I had removed the front seats which made access a lot easier and I was incredibly glad of the carpetting I'd installed, my back thanked me very much for not being jabbed by random bits of floor during some of the fiddlier bits of wire extraction.

    With the front of the cabin basically dealt with, I turned my attention back to the engine bay.  The horn wiring was already removed, this runs up the sides of the radiator support normally to where the horns live on either side.  I wanted to remove the wiring for the lights since they were the furthest items from the bulkhead and would allow me to work my way back.  First of all, I had to figure out the route.  Starting from the bulkhead, the wiring runs down the outside of the steering column and is usually held on with some pear shaped clamps which are long gone on our car and replaced by plastic cable ties instead.  It then snakes around the steering box and into a box section that forms part of the front wing support.  You can just see it looking like a brake flexi hose above the lever arm damper with the shiny bolt here.  That shiny bolt is an incongruous thing too, the car came to us with that in there so we don't know if just the bolt or something else was replaced.

    Some of the wiring goes another route.  For the headlights on the driver's side, a spur should branch off and go up into the wing support bracket and to the headlight.  Another spur goes above the support bracket, through a clip, and to the sidelight unit.

    For the passenger side, the wiring loom runs under the radiator support bracket and repeats the wing support bracket route.  However, on our car there's been some chicanery and the route is a little more complicated for the headlight wiring which goes in and out of the original harness, and alongside it, and has a weird meeting of spade connectors and a switchback. It's a mess.  The route is fundamentally original, while also being overcomplicated for no good reason.

    The side light wiring goes up through the base of the stalk and into the bowl on the top of the wing.  To access it, unscrew the screw, pop off the lens, and then twist-release the bulb holder. Once the bulb is out you can see the phenolic disc that the wiring is soldered to. In our case, new wiring has been crimp-connected to old wiring and enough solder has been used that the phenolic disc can't be removed without desoldering it.  The little copper wire ring is an improvised earth which works when it feels like it, originally there's a copper or brass tang inside the base of the sidelight that does the same job, it's long since fatigued and snapped off on our car on both sides.


    For the headlight, pull the sprung tab on the bottom of the bezel and then prise the bezel off.  We don't have a tab on the driver's side, only the passenger side, and both bezels are so tight you probably don't need the extra security of the tab anyway.

    This then gives you access to the wiring, in this case three bullet connectors.  Two go from the harness to the bulb holder, a third serves as a ground from the bulb holder to the inside of the headlight bowl.  The wiring goes through the threaded stem of the headlight and exits into the inner wing.




    That was as far as we got in the video, so that's where I'll end this wiring update.  It's one of those jobs that takes a lot of time and leaves you with very little to show for it.  As you can see from the condition of what we're starting with, the rewire is absolutely essential on this car to make it safe and, as much as possible, reliable.
  15. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from Agila in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  16. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from rainagain in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  17. Haha
    Joey spud got a reaction from Austat in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    Papped at a fast fit in Essex.

  18. Like
    Joey spud reacted to HMC in HMC motors- New aluminium purchase   
    I’m having a bit of a revisit of first loves. The minor was one, and I’ve got my radar out for others. I’m having a bit of a reminisce about cars I lusted after in my teens. I did like the idea of a TVR cerebra, but a bigger part of me wanted an Austin Somerset, an a60 Cambridge or maybe a bmc 1100/1300 or triumph vitesse.
    As I’m wired up differently I joined the triumph sport six club aged 14 for a year, and asked rimmer bros for a herald/ vitesse catalogue (by phone in those pre www days) and feel I’m gravitating back to 50/60s porridge. Porridge is highly nutritious dontya know!
  19. Like
    Joey spud reacted to HMC in HMC motors- New aluminium purchase   
    Where to begin? 
    I’ve always liked them, even as a small child. Plus there’s that noise. Mind you the few where I grew up were rotting on driveways , as cast off daily drivers waiting to be scrapped. At university in Leeds there were about 5 that were used by students, including a girl i unsuccessfully tried to chat up, who had a peat brown one.
    I had a few once I was able to run a car. Always fun, and over time the good and not so good ones informed be of my ideal age and spec, and in particular where they like to dissolve.
    So I like the 4 doors. I like the later engines, but I also like clap hands wipers and if possible an original old style reg. SO unless it’s a modded one, your looking about 62-64ish. Moon on a stick.
    Anyway one came up in Cornwall, in basically my ideal spec. It’s a ‘63 and a deluxe - I think- as it has a heater (!) The luxury! 
     
    Anyway here it is; I bought it off a lovely elderly couple who took a shine to me as their son and I share the same first name…

    I felt like I was buying a family pet





  20. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from 808 Estate in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  21. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from cort1977 in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  22. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from privatewire in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  23. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from 108 in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  24. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from Remspoor in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    A few years back i found a dumped Chinese Generator on the floor next to some recyling bins and took it home only to find it had no compression.
    Long story short the inlet valve was tight in its guide and when it got hot it got stuck,i cleaned/polished the valve and guide but it still jammed up when hot so i then got a friend with a lathe to take a bit off the valves stem.
    This time it ran ok for a couple of hours before stopping so i had the hump with it and pushed it under the bench and forgot about it for a couple of years until today when i dragged it out and had another look at it.
    It still wouldn't run and the compression seemed low but i doubt it needs much anyway so i pulled the spark plug out a straight away found a big lump of oily clag stuck between its electode and earth tag,which when removed it fired up and has ran perfect all day.
    Happy days...

     
  25. Like
    Joey spud got a reaction from Shite Ron in Hiace project Day van leaving these shores.   
    This old girl walked another mot a couple of weeks back without me even lifting the bonnet or checking the lights (there was a dodgy wiper blade though).
    I have no need for it anymore now i have the Granvia but have no idea what it's worth,as its cosmetically challenged,cat N and this year i had to bypass the leaking heater matrix.
    Then out of the blue i had a call from a guy i sold my L200 to eighteen months back who remembered the Hiace and asked if it was for sale as he had a van sized gap in a shipping container that urgently needed filling.
    I asked what was he offering and he came straight back with a £1000 if i can take it this weekend.
    So i cleared out my junk swapped the new wiper blades on to the Granvia and it's off to Africa (i assume) tomorrow.
    It's been a good van and i've even made a small profit after three years ownership but i feel bad about the fate that awaits it.
    Bye bye Hiace.

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