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mat_the_cat

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  1. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Dave_Q in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  2. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from mercedade in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  3. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Tickman in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  4. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from theshadow in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  5. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Joey spud in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  6. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from The_Equalizer in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  7. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Talbot in Engineered like no other car. Not a single one like it. Thankfully.   
    Today's updatification:
    Didn't get a specific photo of it before doing other work, but I ended up cutting even more out of the floor of the car today.  The repair that had been done previously had rubberised seam sealer slathered all over it, which of course did nothing to actually protect the steel from rotting, if anything it served to hold onto the wet and rot it out faster, so having peeled back more of that ghastly "sealant" there was more steel to remove!
    Getting bored of cutting bits out, and beginning to have some real risk of the floor moving so much I can't line it all back up again, it was time to start glueing bits together again, so the inner sill was cut back to a sensible shape:

    and a repair section welded in:

    I was still getting to grips with the 0.6mm wire and getting the welding settings right on this.. 0.6 mm wire is definitely a game changer on thin steel.  I've always used 0.8 in the past as I had a massive free supply of it, but as I've now finished all that, I thought it time to get some 0.6mm wire, and treat myself to a new longer euro torch.  This one has a rotatable head and is superb.. I now just need a longer earth clamp cable, as the lovely long torch is twice the length of the earth cable now!
    Here's the section I discovered and cut out, mentioned above:

    Got a bit cut ready to go in, but it was getting late, so I've opted to do that tomorrow.  The other square patch is another area of rot that was found.  Had to peel back the outer sill to get to it, and then let in a repair section.  Did that one from inside the car as it was easier access:

    I'd not cleaned the steel up very well on that one, so the weld was a bit shit.  Kept blowing through too as I failed to reduce my welding current for working "normally" as opposed to overhead as I had been with the last weld.  Still, it's solid, and will be completely hidden with carpet on one side and zinc/bitumen paint on the other.  Best kind of repair.
    Still need to re-manufacture the jacking point, as there's some larger sections of steel missing from there, do the other little bits and pieces and then weld on the outer sill.  Then paint, and rustproof.  Urgh!
  8. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Sunny Jim in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  9. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Saabnut in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    As I keep mentioning, I was worried I'd snap another stud, especially this one:

    But in the end it came undone in a bit of an anticlimactic way! I just gave it a testing tap with a spanner, and it cracked loose straight away. So I figured I may as well start the job. A few minutes later it was all off, and new studs in.

    Then manifold back on, which took a bit of jiggling.

    I could then move on to the exhaust. Quality seems OK, not top notch but better than the old one. That didn't even fit particularly well, as the tailpipe was very close to the rear tyre.

    And the PO had to make up an additional bracket to fit it to the chassis mounts!

    But it still knocked on the chassis on startup and switching off, as I realised when taking the gearbox out.
    The new one went on pretty easily, with more clearance all round...



    ...and attached to the new manifold.

    Awaiting the first startup, but I need to cut out a new carb gasket, and I've come inside to warm up!
  10. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Tickman in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    This is the bodged manifold, which is attached to the downpipe with one stud, one bolt and a lot of hope! I've packed with paste and held it all in with a jubilee clip.

    My used manifold arrived, and the studs which join it to the inlet manifold were (accurately) described as showing signs of wear, but the seller included a new set of studs. I took that to mean they didn't want to risk shearing one off before selling it! Two came out reasonably easily, but they had necked down quite considerably to I was very wary of snapping them off, especially as the last two appeared at one with the manifold.

    I could have just left them, but with a packet of new studs in my hand the temptation was too strong. With plenty of heat and gentle persuasion they came out intact...phew!

    New studs were screwed in with the aid of copper grease, but I'm under no illusion that future removal will still be equally stubborn!

    The downpipe studs had already been replaced with stainless, although I've added brass nuts rather than stainless. I've had experience of stainless on stainless fasteners galling before, albeit at higher temperatures than I'd expect on an exhaust, so I'm playing it safe.

    I only hope that the manifold to head fixings all come out, as I don't really want to be taking the head off (even though it looks to be about as simple as they come).

    The heat shield is now here too, but I'm obviously waiting till the manifold swap to fit it.

    One more minor job I've sorted is the seatbelt mountings. I'd assumed these were standard fixings, athough I was concerned they wouldn't be up to much in a crash.

    But @Talbotpointed out the proper mounts were fitted by the B pillar, which is a stronger area, as well as putting the belt in the correct orientation relative to the upper mount. The part number I required was MRC4692, which I found for sale at a mere £220 a pair! I made my own up with a pair of universal plates, at around £3 a side. You can see that the reel is now in a more natural position compared to the other side.

    Lastly a bit of smugness! I've been moving some firewood around on a small trailer, and have fitted a front hitch for maneuverability. Hitching up solo yesterday I was chuffed to get out and find I was 'close enough' at the second attempt

  11. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Talbot in Engineered like no other car. Not a single one like it. Thankfully.   
    Oh Balls.
    As mentioned on the grumpy thread, I managed to poke a hole in the sill of the Merc.  It's MOT is now out, so I need to get going with the welder to get it sorted.  This was what I did:

    Which doesn't look *that* bad.  But, as anyone who has done repair work knows, the rust is going to be worse than that.  I also knew that on the last time I jacked the car up on the jacking point, the sill crunched and compressed in quite a bit, so I was expecting rot.   Removal of the wing liner and the sill liner was needed, as the liner wraps around under the sill.  Theoretically that should give protection to the sill, but I have a feeling that actually it holds a fair bit of mud behind it:

    Arch liner off,  wing trim piece off, door outer seal off too.

    This is not looking good.  I can *feel* the crunchiness.
    Sill guard off now too.. and surprise surprise, there's a fairly large hole under it:

    And to be honest, that welded repair around the jacking point does not give me confidence.  This car has had a repair on this side floorpan before now, and I'm not hopeful for how well it was done..  The welding quality is good, but the fabrication and general quality of the repair isn't so clever.  There's going to be galloping rot in here...

    Yep, there it is.   That is not good at all.  It extends further up the sill too.
    Several hours later, 2 cutting discs later and half a Henry vacuum cleaner full of jacking corrosion later, I have this:

    I also found that I had a completely and utterly saturated foam sound deadening under the carpet, and had to remove the passenger seat to get access to everything.  I did wonder why I've been getting damp on the inside of windows that takes forever to get rid of.. that might be the explanation why!  The inner sill has been rotting away merrily for a few years now, and is in desperate need of actual repair.  It's quite a mess.
    From the inside of the car... this is the passenger footwell/inner sill, and quite a hole:

    Fuckitty fuck fuck fuck.
    Still, I now have a new welding torch, a fresh reel of 0.6mm welding wire and a complete sill pressing, so it's getting repaired.  See what tomorrow brings.
    For amusement value.. there is so much shite in my garage at the moment, I can't get the car in fully, so it looks like this:

    Single garages are crap.  I dream of a decent workshop.
  12. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from theshadow in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    This is the bodged manifold, which is attached to the downpipe with one stud, one bolt and a lot of hope! I've packed with paste and held it all in with a jubilee clip.

    My used manifold arrived, and the studs which join it to the inlet manifold were (accurately) described as showing signs of wear, but the seller included a new set of studs. I took that to mean they didn't want to risk shearing one off before selling it! Two came out reasonably easily, but they had necked down quite considerably to I was very wary of snapping them off, especially as the last two appeared at one with the manifold.

    I could have just left them, but with a packet of new studs in my hand the temptation was too strong. With plenty of heat and gentle persuasion they came out intact...phew!

    New studs were screwed in with the aid of copper grease, but I'm under no illusion that future removal will still be equally stubborn!

    The downpipe studs had already been replaced with stainless, although I've added brass nuts rather than stainless. I've had experience of stainless on stainless fasteners galling before, albeit at higher temperatures than I'd expect on an exhaust, so I'm playing it safe.

    I only hope that the manifold to head fixings all come out, as I don't really want to be taking the head off (even though it looks to be about as simple as they come).

    The heat shield is now here too, but I'm obviously waiting till the manifold swap to fit it.

    One more minor job I've sorted is the seatbelt mountings. I'd assumed these were standard fixings, athough I was concerned they wouldn't be up to much in a crash.

    But @Talbotpointed out the proper mounts were fitted by the B pillar, which is a stronger area, as well as putting the belt in the correct orientation relative to the upper mount. The part number I required was MRC4692, which I found for sale at a mere £220 a pair! I made my own up with a pair of universal plates, at around £3 a side. You can see that the reel is now in a more natural position compared to the other side.

    Lastly a bit of smugness! I've been moving some firewood around on a small trailer, and have fitted a front hitch for maneuverability. Hitching up solo yesterday I was chuffed to get out and find I was 'close enough' at the second attempt

  13. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from N Dentressangle in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    This is the bodged manifold, which is attached to the downpipe with one stud, one bolt and a lot of hope! I've packed with paste and held it all in with a jubilee clip.

    My used manifold arrived, and the studs which join it to the inlet manifold were (accurately) described as showing signs of wear, but the seller included a new set of studs. I took that to mean they didn't want to risk shearing one off before selling it! Two came out reasonably easily, but they had necked down quite considerably to I was very wary of snapping them off, especially as the last two appeared at one with the manifold.

    I could have just left them, but with a packet of new studs in my hand the temptation was too strong. With plenty of heat and gentle persuasion they came out intact...phew!

    New studs were screwed in with the aid of copper grease, but I'm under no illusion that future removal will still be equally stubborn!

    The downpipe studs had already been replaced with stainless, although I've added brass nuts rather than stainless. I've had experience of stainless on stainless fasteners galling before, albeit at higher temperatures than I'd expect on an exhaust, so I'm playing it safe.

    I only hope that the manifold to head fixings all come out, as I don't really want to be taking the head off (even though it looks to be about as simple as they come).

    The heat shield is now here too, but I'm obviously waiting till the manifold swap to fit it.

    One more minor job I've sorted is the seatbelt mountings. I'd assumed these were standard fixings, athough I was concerned they wouldn't be up to much in a crash.

    But @Talbotpointed out the proper mounts were fitted by the B pillar, which is a stronger area, as well as putting the belt in the correct orientation relative to the upper mount. The part number I required was MRC4692, which I found for sale at a mere £220 a pair! I made my own up with a pair of universal plates, at around £3 a side. You can see that the reel is now in a more natural position compared to the other side.

    Lastly a bit of smugness! I've been moving some firewood around on a small trailer, and have fitted a front hitch for maneuverability. Hitching up solo yesterday I was chuffed to get out and find I was 'close enough' at the second attempt

  14. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Crackers in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - cutting holes in the roof!   
    This is the bodged manifold, which is attached to the downpipe with one stud, one bolt and a lot of hope! I've packed with paste and held it all in with a jubilee clip.

    My used manifold arrived, and the studs which join it to the inlet manifold were (accurately) described as showing signs of wear, but the seller included a new set of studs. I took that to mean they didn't want to risk shearing one off before selling it! Two came out reasonably easily, but they had necked down quite considerably to I was very wary of snapping them off, especially as the last two appeared at one with the manifold.

    I could have just left them, but with a packet of new studs in my hand the temptation was too strong. With plenty of heat and gentle persuasion they came out intact...phew!

    New studs were screwed in with the aid of copper grease, but I'm under no illusion that future removal will still be equally stubborn!

    The downpipe studs had already been replaced with stainless, although I've added brass nuts rather than stainless. I've had experience of stainless on stainless fasteners galling before, albeit at higher temperatures than I'd expect on an exhaust, so I'm playing it safe.

    I only hope that the manifold to head fixings all come out, as I don't really want to be taking the head off (even though it looks to be about as simple as they come).

    The heat shield is now here too, but I'm obviously waiting till the manifold swap to fit it.

    One more minor job I've sorted is the seatbelt mountings. I'd assumed these were standard fixings, athough I was concerned they wouldn't be up to much in a crash.

    But @Talbotpointed out the proper mounts were fitted by the B pillar, which is a stronger area, as well as putting the belt in the correct orientation relative to the upper mount. The part number I required was MRC4692, which I found for sale at a mere £220 a pair! I made my own up with a pair of universal plates, at around £3 a side. You can see that the reel is now in a more natural position compared to the other side.

    Lastly a bit of smugness! I've been moving some firewood around on a small trailer, and have fitted a front hitch for maneuverability. Hitching up solo yesterday I was chuffed to get out and find I was 'close enough' at the second attempt

  15. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to sierraman in Brutal decision from the DVLA   
    Fitting the electric motor to the mini was definitely the work of a complete philistine nonetheless I think effort would be better spent on giving out hefty crippling penalties to those driving round with rolling smoke maps or the wheels sitting at an acute camber - ‘stancing’ it whatever the fuck it is they call it. That’s going to be something that impacts road safety, not some idiot that thinks a mini is too noisy and wants some token gesture to show he’s saving the environment. 
  16. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from MorrisItalSLX in Shite Down Under - Elderly Motors For Elderly People - Milestone Achieved!   
    I'm so jealous. For three months of the year nothing dries out around here - almost constant rain, near 100% humidity and next to no sun. Even stuff inside gets covered in condensation. Roll on spring!
  17. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Cavcraft in Cavcraft's cavalcade of crap. Local honey.   
    That there London, today...

    The fella who owned this was a proper nice bloke, had a brief chat with him in a petrol station somewhere near East Molesey

  18. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Cavcraft in Cavcraft's cavalcade of crap. Local honey.   
    GAME OVER, INSERT COIN.
     


     
    Owner says 'O' series petrol (so I assume 1.7) and that he uses it as a day van for the odd run out to places with his wife.
  19. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to MorrisItalSLX in Shite Down Under - Elderly Motors For Elderly People - Milestone Achieved!   
    The only rust concerns I have are where the paint has been baked by the sun to such a degree that surface rust is coming through.
    No road salt and minimal lingering dampness is a major plus point for the connoisseur of the crap motor car.
  20. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to wuvvum in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    This video made me grin.
    I've never been a huge fan of the Daytona - for one thing the styling is blatantly ripped off from the Rover SD1 - but it's still great to see one being driven as Enzo intended.
  21. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to cobblers in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    The accounts dept of one of our customers (A leading bus manufacturer) has sent out an end of year accounts message to all their (350+?) suppliers asking for a statement.
    They haven't used BCC.
    Plenty of people woke up to a very interesting list of email addresses that they'll be using to bypass a few tiers in the supply chain at the very least. GDPR? Never met her.
    Many people are doing a "reply all" to argue about other people doing a "reply all". 🍿🍿🍿
  22. Like
  23. Like
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  25. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to Zelandeth in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Renault, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 29/01 - I need a new door latch...   
    Spot the difference?

    Not really obvious I know.  There's a new set of HT leads, new distributor cap and rotor arm installed.

    New cap and rotor are both Ducellier branded - ones on there bear no maker markings whatsoever which never exactly gives a great deal of confidence.
    This looks like it's been in there for a day or two.

    I rather get the impression that's been on there for more than a couple of thousand miles.
    The leads definitely have seen better days...I'm pretty sure these are meant to be flexible...

    Given I know the insulation on these is compromised (I've managed to get a right belt off them while in the vicinity) there's only one place for these and that will be the bin.

    Haven't found an obvious date code yet, but I suspect they may well be the originals.
    My next challenge is to track down the correct drop links.
    This is what Autodoc sent, and what a few places seem to be trying to send.

    These are 152mm and have a little bend to them.
    These do not match the car.

    Which someone helpfully gave me the original Renault part number for over on the French Car Forums: 7700766869.  Which has allowed me to find that they should in fact be 131mm.  Found plenty of places listing them...nowhere with stock.  Well not quite true.  Found three places so far which have.  One in Italy, one in Turkey neither of which ship to the UK.  Last one is in Russia, which obviously isn't much use right now.
    If anyone knows of someone who might have a couple sitting on a shelf somewhere feel free to let me know.  I suspect that re-bushing the originals may well wind up being the way forward though.
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