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mat_the_cat

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  1. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from BeEP in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Well bought sir! I almost ended up with one of these by accident, as we viewed a house in 2003 which had clearly been owned by someone elderly, and hadn't been touched decor-wise since the 80s. In the garage was a 25 Monaco, and I recall asking the estate agent whether we'd get the house as-is, or whether there was still some clearing out to be done. The answer was basically as we saw it, but sadly when we moved in they'd taken the car (and left us some rather questionable furniture!)


    Given that this was in Gloucestershire, I just wonder if it's the same car. Surely there can't have been huge numbers left in 2003.
  2. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from AnnoyingPentium in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Well bought sir! I almost ended up with one of these by accident, as we viewed a house in 2003 which had clearly been owned by someone elderly, and hadn't been touched decor-wise since the 80s. In the garage was a 25 Monaco, and I recall asking the estate agent whether we'd get the house as-is, or whether there was still some clearing out to be done. The answer was basically as we saw it, but sadly when we moved in they'd taken the car (and left us some rather questionable furniture!)


    Given that this was in Gloucestershire, I just wonder if it's the same car. Surely there can't have been huge numbers left in 2003.
  3. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to Mrs6C in Collection thread   
    Fantastic news! Visas are great cars and welcomed at over 44 million locations worldwide...
    Travel right!

     
  4. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Shite Ron in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Well bought sir! I almost ended up with one of these by accident, as we viewed a house in 2003 which had clearly been owned by someone elderly, and hadn't been touched decor-wise since the 80s. In the garage was a 25 Monaco, and I recall asking the estate agent whether we'd get the house as-is, or whether there was still some clearing out to be done. The answer was basically as we saw it, but sadly when we moved in they'd taken the car (and left us some rather questionable furniture!)


    Given that this was in Gloucestershire, I just wonder if it's the same car. Surely there can't have been huge numbers left in 2003.
  5. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from timolloyd in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Well bought sir! I almost ended up with one of these by accident, as we viewed a house in 2003 which had clearly been owned by someone elderly, and hadn't been touched decor-wise since the 80s. In the garage was a 25 Monaco, and I recall asking the estate agent whether we'd get the house as-is, or whether there was still some clearing out to be done. The answer was basically as we saw it, but sadly when we moved in they'd taken the car (and left us some rather questionable furniture!)


    Given that this was in Gloucestershire, I just wonder if it's the same car. Surely there can't have been huge numbers left in 2003.
  6. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Dick Longbridge in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Well bought sir! I almost ended up with one of these by accident, as we viewed a house in 2003 which had clearly been owned by someone elderly, and hadn't been touched decor-wise since the 80s. In the garage was a 25 Monaco, and I recall asking the estate agent whether we'd get the house as-is, or whether there was still some clearing out to be done. The answer was basically as we saw it, but sadly when we moved in they'd taken the car (and left us some rather questionable furniture!)


    Given that this was in Gloucestershire, I just wonder if it's the same car. Surely there can't have been huge numbers left in 2003.
  7. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Zelandeth in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Okay, have had a chance to sit down for more than two consecutive minutes now, so let's get a proper post written up.
    Back in 2003 I had a Saturday job at a little independent used car dealer out in the middle of nowhere in Aberdeenshire.  I quite often found myself pursuing their trade ins which they deemed to old to be worth cleaning up to sell themselves.  Which I used to be welcome to basically for scrap value - which in 2003 meant about 30p.
    I got a few pretty good bargains I reckoned.
    This Renault 11TC was £125 I think. 

    Sailed though the MOT and I got a decent year's motoring out of it.  I only really sold it on because it turned out that this straddled the line between the pre and post facelift car and had been assembled from whatever they found laying around the factory floor.  A lot of things didn't even vaguely match what either the phase 1 or 2 cars should have had.
    Plus by then it had done the main thing I wanted it to, which was keep the Metro out of the worst of the winter.
    This Saab was £60.

    This was the good side, the other one had a huge poor accident repair on which had been painted with what appeared to be red telephone box paint.  It was also absolutely rotten around the driveshaft tunnels and boot floor.  The gearbox had serious issues and the engine hadn't had an oil change in about ten years and made some truly interesting noises.  This was bought as a "run it on nothing unnecessary till the MOT runs out" basis.  It did then yeild a good number of useful spares.
    The front wheel looks odd in that photo because I was in the middle of replacing the wheel bearing so things are just sitting there - which I think was about the only thing beyond a service I really did to it.  Think I maybe changed the thermostat.
    It basically expired about a week before the MOT ran out when a missing manhole cover in Aberdeen ripped out the lower nearside ball joint.
    There was a free Astra 1.3 Merit (in beige) which I don't think I have a photo of, and a £20 Proton 1.5GL which I basically did my last learning how to do driving test relevant things like reversing around a corner on a local private road (we literally had a mostly paved mile plus long farm road 100 yards from the house which I was allowed to use with permission from the land owner).
    However probably my favourite of all the random stuff that followed me home was this.

    Which cost me either £20 or £60, I can't remember.  It had a couple of days MOT left, so shortly after I got it home my father took it down to the local car guy in the nearest village to see what it might need for a test.
    Sadly it was condemned as the rear suspension arms were rotten.  Bearing in mind the car was worth...well...I'd just paid that for it it wasn't worth repairing.  Now I'd have kept it around just as a lounge to listen to my music on the epic sound system in - but as my father was the one making the calls because I was at college, it turned out that I never saw the car again.  I drove it about 3 miles in total I think.  Which also means that the above is the only photo I have of it save for a horribly grainy underexposed one of the interior.
    We were always a family who tended to forgive and forget, but that was one thing which I really did hold a grudge about for many years, just saying to bin it without even consulting me.
    I always vowed that one day I'd properly own another one.
    Fast forward to ~2010 when I was more a master of my own fate and had some usable disposable income, they'd basically gone extinct.  So I stopped looking.
    Until someone in a Telegram chat posted a link to the C&C classified as for this a couple of days ago.

    Is was clearly somewhat scruffy, the photos weren't great but the ad sounded like it was written by someone who was into cars.  Plus it was actually written in real English which in 2022 feels like a real rarity.

    Initially I sat firmly on the "I absolutely do not need another project" idea.  However having then looked up how many were left and realising it was pretty local I decided it had to be worth a look.  If I didn't I'd forever question if I'd made the right call, and am not expecting to find another pop up.
    This is despite the fact that the car I'd already got on my driveway for the spring 2023 project was parked on what used to be my front lawn because I'm already out of space.  So if I bought it something would absolutely need to move on - one in, one out and it isn't optional.
    So I sent a message to the seller.  What followed was an entirely pleasant E-mail conversation back and forth completely out of character with any experience buying or selling a car to the general public that I've had in the last ten years.  It was arranged that I'd pop over this weekend to have a look at it.
    I was going into this with the expectation of finding it to be quite rotten on account of a somewhat colourful MOT history, and knowing there were a bunch of little other things off the bat in need of sorting.  So my expectation was to view it and probably walk away.  
    I'm greatly appreciative of @Six-cylinder and @AnthonyG (I think - correct me if I've tagged the wrong person) for ferrying me over there today and to assist in sorting out some further logistics I'd fouled up.  
    I got there and found the car...pretty much exactly as described.  I didn't obviously have it up on a ramp and there's only so much you can do trying to lay on the ground on an active public road, but while there have been some patches here and there, it looks by and large pretty clean.  I think the suspension arms (which wrote my original one off) have been replaced as they look far newer than the rest of the car.  
    The only rust I immediately found which will want attention sooner than later is some on the inner wings where some seam sealant has blown out.  The outer wings bolt on and I don't think it will be the end of the world to sort once they're off.  Might actually be far enough away from the strut tops because of how far back they're set not to be an MOT issue - but it wants sorting either way.
    Interior was in decent shape, leather desperately want drowning in leather feed, but everything's there and looks in decent shape.  Bit of obvious wear here and there not no splits I've noticed yet.  Especially glad the Monaco specific door cappings are okay as they'd be an absolute nightmare to find replacements for I imagine.
    We had a quick trundle around the estate and the car seemed to drive fine enough.  There's a drop-linky sort of rattle from the offside front and it's got the usual horribly baggy 80s Renault gear change that needs it's bushings replaced, but from the driver's seat that was about it.  Temperature gauge sits higher than I'd like, but I'm positive I've seen that on these before, and the highly technical "how long can I hold onto the hoses for?" Test and "Can I smell coolant?" Tests say it's running at a perfectly sane temperature.  Most importantly though the gauge got to that spot then stayed steadily there rather than jumping around all over the shop.  
    I was prepared for the brakes to be in a bit of a sorry state given she's only done a few hundred miles in the last five years, but they actually seem absolutely fine.
    Despite having basically told myself it was going to be too much of a project before we got there, I had to admit it was actually a pretty good candidate for a rolling project to tinker with and fettle.  To be absolutely honest with myself, much more in line with my abilities than some of the stuff on the Cavalier.  Particularly that one bit of welding on the offside inner sill which I would almost definitely wind up needing to get someone in to do.  Chassis leg I reckon I can manage, but the sill is a bit more complicated.  
    So a deal was done and we headed for home.  I'd originally expected to take Six-Cylinder along to drive it back as I'd generally found short term insurance (I'll get it transferred to mine on Monday) to be really steep lately.  So when it came back at £19 I was surprised - and just set that up there and then and off we went.
    No petrol station shot as the seller had already filled it up for us!  So have one in a random Waitrose car park instead.

    It's always a little unnerving driving a car back when you've bought it - especially a 34 year old French barge which even when it was new had something of a reputation for flaky electronics.  Double that when it's barely turned a wheel in the last five years.
    However she wafted the 40 miles or so home without missing a beat and in utter comfort.


    Did I mention, comfort?
    I kind of expected that my 19 year old memory of the levels of comfort were very rose tinted.  Nope, I was spot on.
    So...issues.

    Initially I thought someone had stuck a silly rear exhaust section on.  I recall these being annoyingly expensive even back in the early 00s, so that wouldn't have surprised me.  However a bit of quick investigation...

    Figured out it was just a trim...so that's now gone.  Much better.
    She needs a clean.  Like really, really needs a good deep clean.

    Exactly as per the advert, the paint does indeed need help in several areas.  There's some pretty epic clear coat peel.


    The radiator grill is peeling particularly badly too.
    Plus a nasty scrape running a good portion of the way along the driver's side.


    The passenger's door catch clearly needs adjustment as it requires an unreasonably heavy slam to latch fully.
    The LCD display for the clock/stereo/outside temperature display clearly needs either a cleaned zebra strip or replacement ribbon cable.

    The warning light for the washer fluid level is lit...

    That may be as simple as it actually just needing to be filled, haven't even had a chance to look yet.
    Heater blower is a bit squeaky.  
    Nearside front door speaker grill likes to eject itself from the door when you close it.
    Few lamps out in the dash/switches, but nowhere near as many as I expected.

    Does look good at night.

    I do remember thinking that the style of lights they used on the central cluster in the dash with the brightly lit symbol on a dimmer field looked really smart.  Still do.

    Though speaking of the dash, it's hard not to mention this strangeness which wouldn't have been out of place in a Citroen to be honest.

    I haven't tried the windows yet, nor the sunroof - which I didn't really notice until we were underway - that will definitely not be getting touched until spring!
    Central locking does try to work, though it doesn't quite manage to actually get all the doors locked.  Sure a clean and grease of things will sort that.  I do only have one set of keys (and no remote sadly), which I'll need to resolve sooner than later - though it remains to be seen how much of a pain that weird door key is to get cut.
    Overall, seems a reasonably solid base to work from.  Hopefully will get a bit more of a chance to look at it further in the daylight tomorrow.
    Did it make *sense* to buy?  Probably not.  However I have literally been after one for the last 19 years - so logic be damned.
  8. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to Zelandeth in Zel's Motoring Adventures...Merc, Vauxhall, VW, AC Model 70 & A Sinclair C5 - 03/12 - I have done something very silly...   
    Oops.

    Well I've just A - Made a load of work for myself.  B - Ensured my imminent demise. C - Made a load of work for myself.
  9. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to Shite Ron in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    Very considerate of you not to park near any nice cars.
  10. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Talbot in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I measured the length of the new bush, then gave it a light rub with 240 grit wet and dry on a flat surface. I did this in a figure of 8 pattern, to try and avoid putting any tilt into it. After only 3 passes it was down to size, so the next stage was to check the end float between bush and thrust washer (you'll have to imagine the snap ring holding down the thrust washer in this photo!)

    Spec for this is 1 to 8 thou, and I'm measuring 10. If I'd left the bush as-is, it'd have been (just about) OK, but right at the limit of acceptability. To reduce this down you have to change the upper and lower thrust washers, which are available in a range of thicknesses for selective assembly.
    So I'm waiting for these to arrive, but what has arrived is a new 3rd/4th gear synchro assembly. This is quite pricy from Land Rover suppliers, so I did a bit of research and found that it was also fitted to Rover P4 gearboxes, under a now superceded part number. It turned out that JR Wadhams had a few of these as new old stock parts rather than modern reproductions (which may be perfectly OK, I've certainly not read of problems with them). But these were half the typical price of those listed under the LR part number, and don't come in a blue box 

    I can't fit any more until the main shaft is finished, so it's currently sat on the coffee table looking pretty!
    Less good news is the engine. It looks like I need to change the rear main seal, but on the earlier 3 main bearing engines this is a bit of a ballache. Instead of a conventional lip seal pressed in from the rear, this is a split seal which you have to drop the sump and rear bearing cap to change. And I'm thinking unless the bearing shell looks pristine, I can hardly put a worn bearing back in place...
    Did someone say mission creep?
  11. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from mjrose78 in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I measured the length of the new bush, then gave it a light rub with 240 grit wet and dry on a flat surface. I did this in a figure of 8 pattern, to try and avoid putting any tilt into it. After only 3 passes it was down to size, so the next stage was to check the end float between bush and thrust washer (you'll have to imagine the snap ring holding down the thrust washer in this photo!)

    Spec for this is 1 to 8 thou, and I'm measuring 10. If I'd left the bush as-is, it'd have been (just about) OK, but right at the limit of acceptability. To reduce this down you have to change the upper and lower thrust washers, which are available in a range of thicknesses for selective assembly.
    So I'm waiting for these to arrive, but what has arrived is a new 3rd/4th gear synchro assembly. This is quite pricy from Land Rover suppliers, so I did a bit of research and found that it was also fitted to Rover P4 gearboxes, under a now superceded part number. It turned out that JR Wadhams had a few of these as new old stock parts rather than modern reproductions (which may be perfectly OK, I've certainly not read of problems with them). But these were half the typical price of those listed under the LR part number, and don't come in a blue box 

    I can't fit any more until the main shaft is finished, so it's currently sat on the coffee table looking pretty!
    Less good news is the engine. It looks like I need to change the rear main seal, but on the earlier 3 main bearing engines this is a bit of a ballache. Instead of a conventional lip seal pressed in from the rear, this is a split seal which you have to drop the sump and rear bearing cap to change. And I'm thinking unless the bearing shell looks pristine, I can hardly put a worn bearing back in place...
    Did someone say mission creep?
  12. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from mjrose78 in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I had a small package of parts arrive, so set about changing the rear output seal. Greased it up to help it slide in.

    Then used a 52mm socket, bolt and piece of plywood to draw it into place.


    This done I could fit it to the back of the transfer box - first are the shims to preload the output shaft bearings, massive taper roller jobs.

    Then the housing can go on.

    Also arrived was a new shim and circlip for the input shaft. Zero play was achieved, but not too tight that I couldn't move the shim by hand.

    Another arrival was the layshaft distance piece, next to the old one which wasn't thick enough with the new bearing.

    I temporarily refitted the layshaft into the gearbox...

    ...and attached the bellhousing. The idea is that there should be minimal end float of the layshaft, but more than none. If there is zero movement, it means the rear layshaft roller bearing has bound up. You can't check this with the mainshaft in place, hence the temporary partial reassembly.

    Next step is the mainshaft, specifically the bastard lockring,  tucked down below 3rd gear synchro.

    I bought some flat lockring pliers, and modified them to fit in the gap.

    Now although they would fit, they wouldn't open wide enough to get the ring out of the grooves. So I managed to tease it open a little with a screwdriver, and hold it open with drill bits down the splines.

    And it's off, finally!

    Notice that this has obviously been apart before, and clamped in a vice It's not damaged the friction surface, but still...
    With the gears removed, this is the bush which supports them. It often breaks up and/or shears off the pin locking it to the shaft, but the only problem in my case is some light wear.

    Now comes the fettling of the new bush. It's put into place with 2nd and 3rd gears, and weighted down with some old bearings (using the old bush as a spacer) so I can check the clearance. 

    Spec. is 4 to 7 thou, and I'm measuring between 5 and 6. I could assemble as is, but I'd prefer to get it as tight as possible. So I'll take the new bush out and remove a bit of material until it's at the lower end.
  13. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from RayMK in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I measured the length of the new bush, then gave it a light rub with 240 grit wet and dry on a flat surface. I did this in a figure of 8 pattern, to try and avoid putting any tilt into it. After only 3 passes it was down to size, so the next stage was to check the end float between bush and thrust washer (you'll have to imagine the snap ring holding down the thrust washer in this photo!)

    Spec for this is 1 to 8 thou, and I'm measuring 10. If I'd left the bush as-is, it'd have been (just about) OK, but right at the limit of acceptability. To reduce this down you have to change the upper and lower thrust washers, which are available in a range of thicknesses for selective assembly.
    So I'm waiting for these to arrive, but what has arrived is a new 3rd/4th gear synchro assembly. This is quite pricy from Land Rover suppliers, so I did a bit of research and found that it was also fitted to Rover P4 gearboxes, under a now superceded part number. It turned out that JR Wadhams had a few of these as new old stock parts rather than modern reproductions (which may be perfectly OK, I've certainly not read of problems with them). But these were half the typical price of those listed under the LR part number, and don't come in a blue box 

    I can't fit any more until the main shaft is finished, so it's currently sat on the coffee table looking pretty!
    Less good news is the engine. It looks like I need to change the rear main seal, but on the earlier 3 main bearing engines this is a bit of a ballache. Instead of a conventional lip seal pressed in from the rear, this is a split seal which you have to drop the sump and rear bearing cap to change. And I'm thinking unless the bearing shell looks pristine, I can hardly put a worn bearing back in place...
    Did someone say mission creep?
  14. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from warch in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I had a small package of parts arrive, so set about changing the rear output seal. Greased it up to help it slide in.

    Then used a 52mm socket, bolt and piece of plywood to draw it into place.


    This done I could fit it to the back of the transfer box - first are the shims to preload the output shaft bearings, massive taper roller jobs.

    Then the housing can go on.

    Also arrived was a new shim and circlip for the input shaft. Zero play was achieved, but not too tight that I couldn't move the shim by hand.

    Another arrival was the layshaft distance piece, next to the old one which wasn't thick enough with the new bearing.

    I temporarily refitted the layshaft into the gearbox...

    ...and attached the bellhousing. The idea is that there should be minimal end float of the layshaft, but more than none. If there is zero movement, it means the rear layshaft roller bearing has bound up. You can't check this with the mainshaft in place, hence the temporary partial reassembly.

    Next step is the mainshaft, specifically the bastard lockring,  tucked down below 3rd gear synchro.

    I bought some flat lockring pliers, and modified them to fit in the gap.

    Now although they would fit, they wouldn't open wide enough to get the ring out of the grooves. So I managed to tease it open a little with a screwdriver, and hold it open with drill bits down the splines.

    And it's off, finally!

    Notice that this has obviously been apart before, and clamped in a vice It's not damaged the friction surface, but still...
    With the gears removed, this is the bush which supports them. It often breaks up and/or shears off the pin locking it to the shaft, but the only problem in my case is some light wear.

    Now comes the fettling of the new bush. It's put into place with 2nd and 3rd gears, and weighted down with some old bearings (using the old bush as a spacer) so I can check the clearance. 

    Spec. is 4 to 7 thou, and I'm measuring between 5 and 6. I could assemble as is, but I'd prefer to get it as tight as possible. So I'll take the new bush out and remove a bit of material until it's at the lower end.
  15. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from mk2_craig in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I measured the length of the new bush, then gave it a light rub with 240 grit wet and dry on a flat surface. I did this in a figure of 8 pattern, to try and avoid putting any tilt into it. After only 3 passes it was down to size, so the next stage was to check the end float between bush and thrust washer (you'll have to imagine the snap ring holding down the thrust washer in this photo!)

    Spec for this is 1 to 8 thou, and I'm measuring 10. If I'd left the bush as-is, it'd have been (just about) OK, but right at the limit of acceptability. To reduce this down you have to change the upper and lower thrust washers, which are available in a range of thicknesses for selective assembly.
    So I'm waiting for these to arrive, but what has arrived is a new 3rd/4th gear synchro assembly. This is quite pricy from Land Rover suppliers, so I did a bit of research and found that it was also fitted to Rover P4 gearboxes, under a now superceded part number. It turned out that JR Wadhams had a few of these as new old stock parts rather than modern reproductions (which may be perfectly OK, I've certainly not read of problems with them). But these were half the typical price of those listed under the LR part number, and don't come in a blue box 

    I can't fit any more until the main shaft is finished, so it's currently sat on the coffee table looking pretty!
    Less good news is the engine. It looks like I need to change the rear main seal, but on the earlier 3 main bearing engines this is a bit of a ballache. Instead of a conventional lip seal pressed in from the rear, this is a split seal which you have to drop the sump and rear bearing cap to change. And I'm thinking unless the bearing shell looks pristine, I can hardly put a worn bearing back in place...
    Did someone say mission creep?
  16. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from LightBulbFun in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I measured the length of the new bush, then gave it a light rub with 240 grit wet and dry on a flat surface. I did this in a figure of 8 pattern, to try and avoid putting any tilt into it. After only 3 passes it was down to size, so the next stage was to check the end float between bush and thrust washer (you'll have to imagine the snap ring holding down the thrust washer in this photo!)

    Spec for this is 1 to 8 thou, and I'm measuring 10. If I'd left the bush as-is, it'd have been (just about) OK, but right at the limit of acceptability. To reduce this down you have to change the upper and lower thrust washers, which are available in a range of thicknesses for selective assembly.
    So I'm waiting for these to arrive, but what has arrived is a new 3rd/4th gear synchro assembly. This is quite pricy from Land Rover suppliers, so I did a bit of research and found that it was also fitted to Rover P4 gearboxes, under a now superceded part number. It turned out that JR Wadhams had a few of these as new old stock parts rather than modern reproductions (which may be perfectly OK, I've certainly not read of problems with them). But these were half the typical price of those listed under the LR part number, and don't come in a blue box 

    I can't fit any more until the main shaft is finished, so it's currently sat on the coffee table looking pretty!
    Less good news is the engine. It looks like I need to change the rear main seal, but on the earlier 3 main bearing engines this is a bit of a ballache. Instead of a conventional lip seal pressed in from the rear, this is a split seal which you have to drop the sump and rear bearing cap to change. And I'm thinking unless the bearing shell looks pristine, I can hardly put a worn bearing back in place...
    Did someone say mission creep?
  17. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to mk2_craig in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    I am out on my works Christmas meal RIGHT NOW, and unfortunately I have shown my colleagues this thread. They are now egging me on to drunkenly buy something to surpass this, despite the fact I already have a shagged Renner 19 in stock. 
  18. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to Six-cylinder in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    Hopefully @Mrs6C will now realise my buying choices are not so bad!🤣
  19. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to HMC in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    From the owners manual….

    But actually a description of everything that has happened to it 
  20. Haha
    mat_the_cat reacted to Jenson Velcro in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    Wow, I wasn’t expecting that! You’ll have to let us know what you were drinking. I think I’ll be giving it a swerve!,
  21. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to RayMK in HMC- Verso is ace/ Bluebird for sale anyone?   
    @HMCGood luck with your purchase.  My experience with a '96 model was less than perfect - quoting from my earlier post a few years ago:-
    When I had my Nissan QX back in 2005 (1996 model: 2 litre V6), bought to bring some refinement and Japanese reliability in to my life, I was profoundly disappointed.  Refined, yes, the engine was the smoothest and quietest I've ever owned, but the suspension was poor except on motorways.  Reliable?  Was it hell!  Three FTPs and recoveries to garages in the first three months.  A Japanese car specialist diagnosed various sensor failures and replaced them.  Great, I thought.  Forgiven.  A few weeks later it failed to start - symptoms were identical to the first time (basically, irrecoverable flooding on a cold start and a leisurely starter motor) .  I got it recovered to a Nissan main dealer, described its recent past and showed them the receipts and they diagnosed another sensor as u/s and replaced it.  I drove away somewhat disgruntled at yet another £100+ bill.  A week later....you get the picture.  I had it recovered back to the same main dealer who said they'd fixed it.  They fixed it again and wanted me to pay again.  I kicked up a fuss and they let me  have it for free as a gesture of goodwill.  A week or two later the bugger failed to start at home time.  This time, I whipped the plugs out at work and roasted them in an oven, then rushed out, refitted them as quickly as possible and it started after a short struggle.  I thought bollocks to bloody electronics and their equally idiotic diagnostic machines.  It was (fairly) obvious to me that the starter was not spinning the engine fast enough despite the new battery fitted by the selling dealer.  I bought a new starter and spent about three hours excavating a route down to the starter through a myriad of pipes and wires, fitted it, refilled the hole with all  the bits I'd removed and it started as good as gold.  Despite the fact that it did not FTP again in the next 30K miles, my trust in it and my faith in over-complicated electronically controlled vehicles was destroyed.  
    One poor experience with a car can have a lasting effect. I have not even considered another Nissan since.  I'm sure you will be more fortunate.
  22. Like
    mat_the_cat reacted to JimH in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There has been a lot of work being done but most of it is of the mind numbingly dull variety. I'll sort a better update out later but for now here are a couple of photos. Both Sentinels were due their hot test this week so we took the opportunity to at least see if the Super could run under its own steam. 
    The inspector was supposed to be here on Tuesday but he forgot about it which meant we had to get them both going again on Wednesday which gave us a chance to sort out a few teething troubles for the next day. Tuesday was all foggy but at least it moved under its own power even if the steam brake valve was messing about and wouldn't stop it. It looks a bit crap without the rear wings and the cock eyed headlamps hardly help the look but at least it has seen daylight now. What it did remind me of is what a delight Supers are to drive.
     
    Yesterday the sun came out and the brakes worked properly so I felt more confident taking it up a small hill. The bits sticking up from the cab roof are the start of the brackets for the headboard - it was supposed to rain and I didn't want it to get the bare steel wet. I'm pretty pleased with the look of the body. The curve of the roof is right and it looks suitably butch. 
     
    More later.
  23. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Sunny Jim in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I had a small package of parts arrive, so set about changing the rear output seal. Greased it up to help it slide in.

    Then used a 52mm socket, bolt and piece of plywood to draw it into place.


    This done I could fit it to the back of the transfer box - first are the shims to preload the output shaft bearings, massive taper roller jobs.

    Then the housing can go on.

    Also arrived was a new shim and circlip for the input shaft. Zero play was achieved, but not too tight that I couldn't move the shim by hand.

    Another arrival was the layshaft distance piece, next to the old one which wasn't thick enough with the new bearing.

    I temporarily refitted the layshaft into the gearbox...

    ...and attached the bellhousing. The idea is that there should be minimal end float of the layshaft, but more than none. If there is zero movement, it means the rear layshaft roller bearing has bound up. You can't check this with the mainshaft in place, hence the temporary partial reassembly.

    Next step is the mainshaft, specifically the bastard lockring,  tucked down below 3rd gear synchro.

    I bought some flat lockring pliers, and modified them to fit in the gap.

    Now although they would fit, they wouldn't open wide enough to get the ring out of the grooves. So I managed to tease it open a little with a screwdriver, and hold it open with drill bits down the splines.

    And it's off, finally!

    Notice that this has obviously been apart before, and clamped in a vice It's not damaged the friction surface, but still...
    With the gears removed, this is the bush which supports them. It often breaks up and/or shears off the pin locking it to the shaft, but the only problem in my case is some light wear.

    Now comes the fettling of the new bush. It's put into place with 2nd and 3rd gears, and weighted down with some old bearings (using the old bush as a spacer) so I can check the clearance. 

    Spec. is 4 to 7 thou, and I'm measuring between 5 and 6. I could assemble as is, but I'd prefer to get it as tight as possible. So I'll take the new bush out and remove a bit of material until it's at the lower end.
  24. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from Sunny Jim in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    Tonight I finished off the 4x4 selector box, ready for fitting to the transfer box.

    The dog on the left links the front and rear output shafts to select 4wd. The shaft which operates this is spring-loaded, so that when a pin is lifted (pushing the yellow lever down), 4wd in normal high ratio is engaged.  The upper shaft is linked to the high/low gear selector in the transfer box, so that whenever low ratio is selected, 4wd is also engaged. All this selection mechanism is lubricated by an oil slinger, so no appreciable wear. 
    The 4wd selector box was slid onto the front of the transfer box, and the low ratio 4wd selector shaft slid into the selector fork.

    I replaced the seal at the end of this shaft, and also the small O ring on the pin which allows high ratio 4wd to be engaged.

    There is a little bit of rusting on the ends of the shafts, but I've smoothed this off and greased them.
    Finally, the dust cover was fitted over the ends of the shaft.

  25. Like
    mat_the_cat got a reaction from puddlethumper in The oldest Land-Rover Series 3 around - gearbox rebuild underway   
    I had a small package of parts arrive, so set about changing the rear output seal. Greased it up to help it slide in.

    Then used a 52mm socket, bolt and piece of plywood to draw it into place.


    This done I could fit it to the back of the transfer box - first are the shims to preload the output shaft bearings, massive taper roller jobs.

    Then the housing can go on.

    Also arrived was a new shim and circlip for the input shaft. Zero play was achieved, but not too tight that I couldn't move the shim by hand.

    Another arrival was the layshaft distance piece, next to the old one which wasn't thick enough with the new bearing.

    I temporarily refitted the layshaft into the gearbox...

    ...and attached the bellhousing. The idea is that there should be minimal end float of the layshaft, but more than none. If there is zero movement, it means the rear layshaft roller bearing has bound up. You can't check this with the mainshaft in place, hence the temporary partial reassembly.

    Next step is the mainshaft, specifically the bastard lockring,  tucked down below 3rd gear synchro.

    I bought some flat lockring pliers, and modified them to fit in the gap.

    Now although they would fit, they wouldn't open wide enough to get the ring out of the grooves. So I managed to tease it open a little with a screwdriver, and hold it open with drill bits down the splines.

    And it's off, finally!

    Notice that this has obviously been apart before, and clamped in a vice It's not damaged the friction surface, but still...
    With the gears removed, this is the bush which supports them. It often breaks up and/or shears off the pin locking it to the shaft, but the only problem in my case is some light wear.

    Now comes the fettling of the new bush. It's put into place with 2nd and 3rd gears, and weighted down with some old bearings (using the old bush as a spacer) so I can check the clearance. 

    Spec. is 4 to 7 thou, and I'm measuring between 5 and 6. I could assemble as is, but I'd prefer to get it as tight as possible. So I'll take the new bush out and remove a bit of material until it's at the lower end.
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