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jonny69

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  1. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Out Run in Odd looking and odd cylindered Beast from the Far East - Now EMTB friendly.   
    This thread has become photobucket obscure-tastic!
    Loving the boxed-in ply flat floor.
    I feel your pain about sticking in those concrete fence posts. I dug my old ones out with a spade and put 18 of them in new holes all by hand a couple of months ago and it pretty much broke me. Right up there with the hardest work I've ever done. Could have done with knowing about those post hole diggers and those big concrete plug smashing chisel things maybe BEFORE the job rather than after!
  2. Thanks
    jonny69 got a reaction from strangeangel in Old airbags in shonky old rammel: still safe?   
    I don’t think you really understood my question. My concern was that I’m driving around with a 15+ year old airbag in front of me. Which is a 15+ year old box of explosives. I used to work in pyrotechnics and there’s no fucking way you’d even handle 15 year old pyros, let alone store them in a box in front of you when you’re driving. I probably wouldn’t sit on my sofa with a 15 year old box of fireworks stored under it either. I don’t think it’s just going to go off by itself but we’ve had no definite answer to that yet other than ‘it might not go off’ and some anecdotal musings that are little more than opinion. 
  3. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Angrydicky in Old airbags in shonky old rammel: still safe?   
    I don’t think you really understood my question. My concern was that I’m driving around with a 15+ year old airbag in front of me. Which is a 15+ year old box of explosives. I used to work in pyrotechnics and there’s no fucking way you’d even handle 15 year old pyros, let alone store them in a box in front of you when you’re driving. I probably wouldn’t sit on my sofa with a 15 year old box of fireworks stored under it either. I don’t think it’s just going to go off by itself but we’ve had no definite answer to that yet other than ‘it might not go off’ and some anecdotal musings that are little more than opinion. 
  4. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from strangeangel in Strangeangel's Citroënic Shenanigans (featuring the Autoshite BX, Ami Break and some bikes) 19/11 DVLA come up with the goods (again!)   
    Something doesn’t sound right there. The old motor would pull both wipers across the screen dry with no problems. It shouldn’t struggle at all. 
  5. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from somewhatfoolish in Strangeangel's Citroënic Shenanigans (featuring the Autoshite BX, Ami Break and some bikes) 19/11 DVLA come up with the goods (again!)   
    Something doesn’t sound right there. The old motor would pull both wipers across the screen dry with no problems. It shouldn’t struggle at all. 
  6. Thanks
    jonny69 got a reaction from juular in Old airbags in shonky old rammel: still safe?   
    I think about this fairly frequently. I'm basically driving a car with a bag of 15 year old explosives right in front of my face. Many of you in older shite than me with earlier airbags. Should we be worried about that? Do they have a 'use by' date? What do we do when it comes to 25, 30, 40 years old? Will they even trigger by that point?
    I don't think I've seen this brought up on here, but I do tend to dip in and out of the forum a bit so might have missed it. Can't see anything obvious in the search.
  7. Like
    jonny69 reacted to Stanky in Old airbags in shonky old rammel: still safe?   
    Having first-hand experience of driving a 15 year old skoda felicia (with airbag) into the back of a Vauxhall insignia at moderate speed on the m27 in 2011, the airbag failed to deploy. I think the general consensus is that they DO have a BBE date, but no-one replaces them and certainly nowhere wants a pile of out-of-date airbags lying about so they get left in situ.
    I think I heard/read somewhere that the default failure mode is that they don't trigger, rather than decide to go off randomly while you're sat in a queue at McDonalds drive-thru one day, showering the postcode with cold chips and impacting chicken nuggets through your forehead.
  8. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from BlankFrank in Old airbags in shonky old rammel: still safe?   
    I think about this fairly frequently. I'm basically driving a car with a bag of 15 year old explosives right in front of my face. Many of you in older shite than me with earlier airbags. Should we be worried about that? Do they have a 'use by' date? What do we do when it comes to 25, 30, 40 years old? Will they even trigger by that point?
    I don't think I've seen this brought up on here, but I do tend to dip in and out of the forum a bit so might have missed it. Can't see anything obvious in the search.
  9. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Jim Bell in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Cross posting from Shiter’s Boots. What’s UP shite homies!!!
    Whats going on here at Shateau 69? Not much. Stuck at home during lockdown due to medical shielding and haven’t moved much. Insight has done one journey since mid March. Anglia is still sat in the garage.
    After the grid charging in November, the battery continued to give me problems. I did the charge/discharge cycle thing (see previous post) over Christmas and pretty much cured it. My current commute is quite hard on the battery and is all the things that these cars hate doing, so I figured I’d probably have to cycle it again at some point. Seemed like a good time to do it since it had sat for 3 months and looking ahead it’ll be sitting for some time further without use. May as well get the battery in good shape while it’s out of use and just top it up from time to time until I use the car regularly again.
    Last time, the battery was actually in pretty bad shape and the discharge cycling corrected it. I logged the charges and discharges and the battery gained around 40% capacity in the process. That’s from reversing the memory effect by taking the cells to a low enough voltage and by reactivating the battery chemistry which has a habit of going dormant when it’s not used.
    Here’s the kit in the back of the car. Black box is the grid charger, which is nothing more than a simple constant-current LED driver to do the charging and a voltmeter. The lightbulb thing is the discharger and is a couple of 60W mains bulbs screwed to a plank. I’ve lashed on a cheap eBay volt/current meter to log the discharge, with the intention at some point to integrate that stuff into the charger to make an all-in-one box. You can actually buy these pre-made but they’re expensive and not so much of a fire hazard very Autoshite.

  10. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Jim Bell in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  11. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Jim Bell in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Unsurprisingly, this passed its MOT again with no advisories. However, what I didn't expect was when the weather turned cold a few weeks back it threw up an EML and IMA light on the dash. Dying hybrid battery? Dread. ODB2 code P1449 confirmed that, blink code 78 = battery module deterioration. More dread.
    I had already planned to build a grid charger (like @Asimo's one) and do a charge/discharge cycle over Christmas, to see if it improved performance, but now I had to hurry up and get on with it. I got really confused about what fixed current LED driver I had to use. I got one that said it would put out 180V in the spec but in reality it only showed 150V open circuit and that wasn't enough. With a toddler at home I literally have no time to spend loads of time on this of an evening and only really have my lunchtimes, so I ended up buying a 240V compatible charger from the States because it was less hassle. It came with a much better charging harness than the one that was already on the car, so one lunchtime last week I pulled the old one out and fitted the new one. Set it on a dumb saturation charge overnight, 14 hours in total, and logged the battery voltage hourly. Plotting the voltage against time, I could see when it was charging and when it was saturated, ie just topping up the more empty cells. It took a lot of charge, so it must have been right out of balance, but it's performing better now than it ever has since I've owned the car.
    So here's what happens with these batteries: There are 120 cells in series which adds up to around 144V nominally, or about 160V-170V in operation. The car only cycles the battery between 20% and 80% charge, so it never fully charges it and never fully discharges it but the battery lasts longer as a result. Over time, the cells become unbalanced, which means some of them in the pack are more charged than others. When you use the battery, those more empty ones discharge sooner and the car sees this and backs off the assist. The 'stronger' cells which are sitting at a higher state of charge do not get discharged very deeply and start to suffer from memory effect as a result.
    There are two things you can do:
    A saturation charge with a grid charger effectively charges all the cells up until they're all as full as each other. This balances everything so that it all discharges at the same time. The more full cells fill up first, then the more empty ones catch up until they're all the same. Apparently with NiMH this doesn't overcharge the more full cells, they just kick the excess out as heat and the battery fan keeps them cool. The memory effect can be reversed by deep discharging. Using the charging harness, the battery is completely discharged at a low current using a low-ish wattage bulb, then recharged and repeated a couple of times. The depth of discharge is a subject of debate, but below 1V per cell seems to be what's needed, then further for subsequent cycles. If the pack is badly degraded, there seems to be some evidence that an ultra deep discharge to 50V overall can revive it, but it degrades the all-out capacity of the cells at the same time. Great for bringing an already dying pack back to life, but it slightly hurts a good pack. I've done number 1 above. The pack is now performing really well. Previously on full throttle, I'd get full assist for about 5 seconds, then the car would back it off to about 50%. Now it gives full assist for as long as I keep my foot down. Previously it would empty the pack in the couple of miles of stop-start traffic coming out of work and charge itself back up on the open road, but now it maintains its voltage and doesn't have to do so much parasitic charging.
    I don't think my pack needs a very deep discharge, so I'm not going to worry about it just yet. I think it probably does have a bit of memory effect, so I'm going to do a charge/discharge/recharge cycle over Christmas but only down to 120V or so. It'll be more of a conditioning cycle but not deep enough to degrade the upper part of the cells.
    If you were wondering what's under the carpet in the back of the Insight, there's a big aluminium battery cover and under that is the battery on the right hand side and all the control gear on the left. Edit: spare wheel is under the dimpled black cover down at the bottom. There's quite a lot of empty space underneath and down the sides. It's not the best use of the space IMO!


  12. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Jim Bell in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    One year on seems like about right for an update.
    -Merc is now long gone and good riddance. I don’t really miss it.
    -Ami never sold on Car and Classic. It’s gone to strangeangel on here who is giving it the tlc it needed.
    -Anglia actually hasn’t been out the lock up since I parked it up last winter and it probably won’t be out again for a while. Toddler and house renovations are taking up all my time. It’s insured and ready to go, though, it’ll just need some fuel in it and the battery putting back on.
    -Insight is reinsured for another year and also running a new lease of life. More below:
    The clutch relearn thing I did before clearly hadn’t worked. It went back out of kilter fairly quickly and was banging into drive quite roughly. Additionally, it had developed a weird bump in the transmission on deceleration. I could replicate it each time and both things together were making driving in traffic a nightmare. I was making plans to write it off as a dead clutch and box - before I had one last go. 
    One more fluid change, because I already had the fluid. Plus I changed the two internal filters because they probably needed doing by 85k miles. This made no difference, which was upsetting. There was one thing else that had happened, which I hadn’t accounted for, which was that I’d changed the 12V battery. This forces a complete reset in the car and it ‘forgets’ all the settings including the clutch and gearing points. Argh, could this be it?!!
    I did the clutch relearn procedure again - except this time it triggered into an actual procedure and I could feel it finding the biting point. Then I took it out and did the gearbox calibration, which is to drive up to 40mph, turn the lights on and let it coast down to zero. After that, the clutch was engaging perfectly and the bump in the gearing was gone. I can’t believe it was that simple and just a silly oversight on my part has caused me so much worry!
    Have a thoroughly badly thought out last minute photo from this morning. Notice it’s not washed and I’ll probably need to do the headlights to pass the MOT.

  13. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Jim Bell in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Citroen update: We’re back in business!
     

     
    Wind back to September and it conked out on the way to work and I had to get towed home. Fuelling issues again and I haven’t run it since. Today I [finally] got around to putting a new pump on it. Checked the fuel lines front to back and they’re all clear. Battery needs replacing but it fired straight up with hardly any cranking - so that’s a pretty good sign! Everything else also works, which is a surprise after sitting for 9+ months!
     
    Next job is to give it a chuffing good wash and polish inside and out, then this badboy is up for sale.
  14. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from cobblers in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Cross posting from Shiter’s Boots. What’s UP shite homies!!!
    Whats going on here at Shateau 69? Not much. Stuck at home during lockdown due to medical shielding and haven’t moved much. Insight has done one journey since mid March. Anglia is still sat in the garage.
    After the grid charging in November, the battery continued to give me problems. I did the charge/discharge cycle thing (see previous post) over Christmas and pretty much cured it. My current commute is quite hard on the battery and is all the things that these cars hate doing, so I figured I’d probably have to cycle it again at some point. Seemed like a good time to do it since it had sat for 3 months and looking ahead it’ll be sitting for some time further without use. May as well get the battery in good shape while it’s out of use and just top it up from time to time until I use the car regularly again.
    Last time, the battery was actually in pretty bad shape and the discharge cycling corrected it. I logged the charges and discharges and the battery gained around 40% capacity in the process. That’s from reversing the memory effect by taking the cells to a low enough voltage and by reactivating the battery chemistry which has a habit of going dormant when it’s not used.
    Here’s the kit in the back of the car. Black box is the grid charger, which is nothing more than a simple constant-current LED driver to do the charging and a voltmeter. The lightbulb thing is the discharger and is a couple of 60W mains bulbs screwed to a plank. I’ve lashed on a cheap eBay volt/current meter to log the discharge, with the intention at some point to integrate that stuff into the charger to make an all-in-one box. You can actually buy these pre-made but they’re expensive and not so much of a fire hazard very Autoshite.

  15. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from cobblers in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Unsurprisingly, this passed its MOT again with no advisories. However, what I didn't expect was when the weather turned cold a few weeks back it threw up an EML and IMA light on the dash. Dying hybrid battery? Dread. ODB2 code P1449 confirmed that, blink code 78 = battery module deterioration. More dread.
    I had already planned to build a grid charger (like @Asimo's one) and do a charge/discharge cycle over Christmas, to see if it improved performance, but now I had to hurry up and get on with it. I got really confused about what fixed current LED driver I had to use. I got one that said it would put out 180V in the spec but in reality it only showed 150V open circuit and that wasn't enough. With a toddler at home I literally have no time to spend loads of time on this of an evening and only really have my lunchtimes, so I ended up buying a 240V compatible charger from the States because it was less hassle. It came with a much better charging harness than the one that was already on the car, so one lunchtime last week I pulled the old one out and fitted the new one. Set it on a dumb saturation charge overnight, 14 hours in total, and logged the battery voltage hourly. Plotting the voltage against time, I could see when it was charging and when it was saturated, ie just topping up the more empty cells. It took a lot of charge, so it must have been right out of balance, but it's performing better now than it ever has since I've owned the car.
    So here's what happens with these batteries: There are 120 cells in series which adds up to around 144V nominally, or about 160V-170V in operation. The car only cycles the battery between 20% and 80% charge, so it never fully charges it and never fully discharges it but the battery lasts longer as a result. Over time, the cells become unbalanced, which means some of them in the pack are more charged than others. When you use the battery, those more empty ones discharge sooner and the car sees this and backs off the assist. The 'stronger' cells which are sitting at a higher state of charge do not get discharged very deeply and start to suffer from memory effect as a result.
    There are two things you can do:
    A saturation charge with a grid charger effectively charges all the cells up until they're all as full as each other. This balances everything so that it all discharges at the same time. The more full cells fill up first, then the more empty ones catch up until they're all the same. Apparently with NiMH this doesn't overcharge the more full cells, they just kick the excess out as heat and the battery fan keeps them cool. The memory effect can be reversed by deep discharging. Using the charging harness, the battery is completely discharged at a low current using a low-ish wattage bulb, then recharged and repeated a couple of times. The depth of discharge is a subject of debate, but below 1V per cell seems to be what's needed, then further for subsequent cycles. If the pack is badly degraded, there seems to be some evidence that an ultra deep discharge to 50V overall can revive it, but it degrades the all-out capacity of the cells at the same time. Great for bringing an already dying pack back to life, but it slightly hurts a good pack. I've done number 1 above. The pack is now performing really well. Previously on full throttle, I'd get full assist for about 5 seconds, then the car would back it off to about 50%. Now it gives full assist for as long as I keep my foot down. Previously it would empty the pack in the couple of miles of stop-start traffic coming out of work and charge itself back up on the open road, but now it maintains its voltage and doesn't have to do so much parasitic charging.
    I don't think my pack needs a very deep discharge, so I'm not going to worry about it just yet. I think it probably does have a bit of memory effect, so I'm going to do a charge/discharge/recharge cycle over Christmas but only down to 120V or so. It'll be more of a conditioning cycle but not deep enough to degrade the upper part of the cells.
    If you were wondering what's under the carpet in the back of the Insight, there's a big aluminium battery cover and under that is the battery on the right hand side and all the control gear on the left. Edit: spare wheel is under the dimpled black cover down at the bottom. There's quite a lot of empty space underneath and down the sides. It's not the best use of the space IMO!


  16. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from worldofceri in Lazy spotters thread   
    Turd of all turds. I mean, I don’t even remember ever seeing one of these, let alone when did you last see... etc. 

  17. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from worldofceri in Lazy spotters thread   
    Halfords car park. Purple bug behind it belongs to a guy that works there. Not the original builder, but a long-term owner. 

  18. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from garethj in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  19. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from somewhatfoolish in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  20. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from somewhatfoolish in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Cross posting from Shiter’s Boots. What’s UP shite homies!!!
    Whats going on here at Shateau 69? Not much. Stuck at home during lockdown due to medical shielding and haven’t moved much. Insight has done one journey since mid March. Anglia is still sat in the garage.
    After the grid charging in November, the battery continued to give me problems. I did the charge/discharge cycle thing (see previous post) over Christmas and pretty much cured it. My current commute is quite hard on the battery and is all the things that these cars hate doing, so I figured I’d probably have to cycle it again at some point. Seemed like a good time to do it since it had sat for 3 months and looking ahead it’ll be sitting for some time further without use. May as well get the battery in good shape while it’s out of use and just top it up from time to time until I use the car regularly again.
    Last time, the battery was actually in pretty bad shape and the discharge cycling corrected it. I logged the charges and discharges and the battery gained around 40% capacity in the process. That’s from reversing the memory effect by taking the cells to a low enough voltage and by reactivating the battery chemistry which has a habit of going dormant when it’s not used.
    Here’s the kit in the back of the car. Black box is the grid charger, which is nothing more than a simple constant-current LED driver to do the charging and a voltmeter. The lightbulb thing is the discharger and is a couple of 60W mains bulbs screwed to a plank. I’ve lashed on a cheap eBay volt/current meter to log the discharge, with the intention at some point to integrate that stuff into the charger to make an all-in-one box. You can actually buy these pre-made but they’re expensive and not so much of a fire hazard very Autoshite.

  21. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from spartacus in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  22. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from grizgut in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  23. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from rainagain in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Smoll car pretending to be floor fitter’s van. Loads of space. 


  24. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from rainagain in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Unsurprisingly, this passed its MOT again with no advisories. However, what I didn't expect was when the weather turned cold a few weeks back it threw up an EML and IMA light on the dash. Dying hybrid battery? Dread. ODB2 code P1449 confirmed that, blink code 78 = battery module deterioration. More dread.
    I had already planned to build a grid charger (like @Asimo's one) and do a charge/discharge cycle over Christmas, to see if it improved performance, but now I had to hurry up and get on with it. I got really confused about what fixed current LED driver I had to use. I got one that said it would put out 180V in the spec but in reality it only showed 150V open circuit and that wasn't enough. With a toddler at home I literally have no time to spend loads of time on this of an evening and only really have my lunchtimes, so I ended up buying a 240V compatible charger from the States because it was less hassle. It came with a much better charging harness than the one that was already on the car, so one lunchtime last week I pulled the old one out and fitted the new one. Set it on a dumb saturation charge overnight, 14 hours in total, and logged the battery voltage hourly. Plotting the voltage against time, I could see when it was charging and when it was saturated, ie just topping up the more empty cells. It took a lot of charge, so it must have been right out of balance, but it's performing better now than it ever has since I've owned the car.
    So here's what happens with these batteries: There are 120 cells in series which adds up to around 144V nominally, or about 160V-170V in operation. The car only cycles the battery between 20% and 80% charge, so it never fully charges it and never fully discharges it but the battery lasts longer as a result. Over time, the cells become unbalanced, which means some of them in the pack are more charged than others. When you use the battery, those more empty ones discharge sooner and the car sees this and backs off the assist. The 'stronger' cells which are sitting at a higher state of charge do not get discharged very deeply and start to suffer from memory effect as a result.
    There are two things you can do:
    A saturation charge with a grid charger effectively charges all the cells up until they're all as full as each other. This balances everything so that it all discharges at the same time. The more full cells fill up first, then the more empty ones catch up until they're all the same. Apparently with NiMH this doesn't overcharge the more full cells, they just kick the excess out as heat and the battery fan keeps them cool. The memory effect can be reversed by deep discharging. Using the charging harness, the battery is completely discharged at a low current using a low-ish wattage bulb, then recharged and repeated a couple of times. The depth of discharge is a subject of debate, but below 1V per cell seems to be what's needed, then further for subsequent cycles. If the pack is badly degraded, there seems to be some evidence that an ultra deep discharge to 50V overall can revive it, but it degrades the all-out capacity of the cells at the same time. Great for bringing an already dying pack back to life, but it slightly hurts a good pack. I've done number 1 above. The pack is now performing really well. Previously on full throttle, I'd get full assist for about 5 seconds, then the car would back it off to about 50%. Now it gives full assist for as long as I keep my foot down. Previously it would empty the pack in the couple of miles of stop-start traffic coming out of work and charge itself back up on the open road, but now it maintains its voltage and doesn't have to do so much parasitic charging.
    I don't think my pack needs a very deep discharge, so I'm not going to worry about it just yet. I think it probably does have a bit of memory effect, so I'm going to do a charge/discharge/recharge cycle over Christmas but only down to 120V or so. It'll be more of a conditioning cycle but not deep enough to degrade the upper part of the cells.
    If you were wondering what's under the carpet in the back of the Insight, there's a big aluminium battery cover and under that is the battery on the right hand side and all the control gear on the left. Edit: spare wheel is under the dimpled black cover down at the bottom. There's quite a lot of empty space underneath and down the sides. It's not the best use of the space IMO!


  25. Like
    jonny69 got a reaction from Asimo in Recent ridiculous rubbish: J69's ramblings, Anglia, G1 Honda Insight   
    Cross posting from Shiter’s Boots. What’s UP shite homies!!!
    Whats going on here at Shateau 69? Not much. Stuck at home during lockdown due to medical shielding and haven’t moved much. Insight has done one journey since mid March. Anglia is still sat in the garage.
    After the grid charging in November, the battery continued to give me problems. I did the charge/discharge cycle thing (see previous post) over Christmas and pretty much cured it. My current commute is quite hard on the battery and is all the things that these cars hate doing, so I figured I’d probably have to cycle it again at some point. Seemed like a good time to do it since it had sat for 3 months and looking ahead it’ll be sitting for some time further without use. May as well get the battery in good shape while it’s out of use and just top it up from time to time until I use the car regularly again.
    Last time, the battery was actually in pretty bad shape and the discharge cycling corrected it. I logged the charges and discharges and the battery gained around 40% capacity in the process. That’s from reversing the memory effect by taking the cells to a low enough voltage and by reactivating the battery chemistry which has a habit of going dormant when it’s not used.
    Here’s the kit in the back of the car. Black box is the grid charger, which is nothing more than a simple constant-current LED driver to do the charging and a voltmeter. The lightbulb thing is the discharger and is a couple of 60W mains bulbs screwed to a plank. I’ve lashed on a cheap eBay volt/current meter to log the discharge, with the intention at some point to integrate that stuff into the charger to make an all-in-one box. You can actually buy these pre-made but they’re expensive and not so much of a fire hazard very Autoshite.

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