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danthecapriman

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About danthecapriman

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    Rank: Lancia Gamma

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    Male
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    Waterlooville, Hampshire

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  • Country
    England

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  1. It probably is just lack of use tbh Eddy, coupled with it being winter so damp old electrics starting to cause problems. I had it once in the Capri where I went out in it after winter lay-up, switched the heater fan on and it didn’t do anything, then a trail of smoke came out from behind the dash, then it started working fine! Just damp and dirty contacts I think! Not much anyone can do at the moment sadly. None of mine have been used since about November. There’s just nowhere to go and nothing to do, I dont even think going for a drive around is allowed at the moment is it!? Things wi
  2. I’ve been there too! It was a customers car, I think it was a Renault scenic or something, did a full service on it, topped up the oil and ran it out of the garage. The foreman did a quality control check on it but when he came back he said it stunk of burning oil so you better take a look... opened the bonnet to find the oil cap missing and oil splattered all over the engine bay! Took me hours to clean my mess up. Went to jump start my sisters car one night as she’d got stuck at college with a dead battery. Connected up the jump leads, thought I’d give it a few mins to get a bit of ch
  3. Here’s the filter element: https://www.partsforvolvosonline.com/product_info.php?cPath=105_919_922&products_id=5277&osCsid=8565022f8d45f9d49b4a1ea3ee82f252
  4. The flame trap is a little breather element in-line with the engines crankcase breather system, it basically stops lumps of oily crud and liquid oil residue etc from getting drawn into the engine as it recycles its own dirty oily air. It’s located directly beneath the inlet manifold on the B2xxE engines, it’s hard to see and a bit of a pig to get to sometimes but does often need doing. There’s a few rubber hoses coming out/into it and it’s a little black plastic case that separates into two halves with a breather filter element inside. A new element costs pence from volvo specialists and I
  5. Nice! Quite an early face lift 700, with a B200E engine by the looks of it. Nice and easy to work on and pretty bulletproof mechanically. Give your flame trap a clean and a new filter element as I bet it’s dirty. If they plug up it over pressurises the crankcase and starts causing leaks etc.
  6. They are very good for motorway use, they’ll do 70+ easy enough but quick they aren’t. They’re more suited to long distance cruising in comfort. Remember, these Volvo’s sold very very well in the USA where long hauls are commonplace and there’s a good reason they became popular. The down side is the fuel economy isn’t great. It’s not V8 levels of bad but for a mid sized 4 cylinder it’s not great! I had a 2.3GLE auto saloon before my current estate and I did some long runs in that up and down the country and it handled it all with ease, tbh there’s few better ways to do it imho, providi
  7. If you go fast it just means nobody can see how cool you are!😆
  8. My only real breakdown (that I couldn’t fix or ignore!) was in the Mercury. It was the trip home from the importer’s in Milton Keynes. They rang me and said it was in their warehouse and ready to drive away, so I arranged a Friday to go up and drive it home. Got there about mid day, to find the car still in the warehouse up on the ramp. This isn’t looking good! It turned out that the battery had gone flat. Despite my car being the only one (of 4) that came over the pond together whose battery survived the ship journey and started straight up at this end and able to jump the others.
  9. OMG! That’s lovely. Great colour too. Sounds like I’m preaching to the converted here, but they are fantastic cars! Very very capable, comfortable and useful. I absolutely love em. The 2.3 isn't quick either tbh, but that’s not what these are about. You got any pics of the engine?
  10. Sadly, no rear cover on mine either. I might steal your soap pump bottle idea, it’s awkward using the spouts on the oil bottles and trying to squeeze them to force oil out. I did fill the Capri up using one of those little oil cans with the little pump handle but it took ages and made my thumb ache!
  11. I tried doing the diff oil on the Capri a few years ago by using a big old syringe with a length of plastic washer hose stuck on the end. It worked, but my god it was hard and time consuming trying to suck cold thick gear oil out with it!
  12. I’ve just ordered a Silverline fluid pump off eBay. I’m more interested in it for doing shitty jobs like diff/gearbox oil changes etc rather than engine oil. Ive got the diff and power steering oils to change on the Volvo, which is why I bought it, so hopefully it’ll work well! It’s got to be easier than trying to undo ancient seized drain bungs or trying to catch old fluid in cut up bottles etc in the engine bay.
  13. Liked for effort Eddy! What a bummer! Although Huggy technically did manage a drive out for at least part of the trip so it’s not a total loss. Hopefully the starter solenoid has just been affected by a bit of damp and inaction and it can be sorted quickly and cheaply.
  14. Sadly I lived that nightmare! Mine was an H reg 1.4glx and it was a fucking pile of absolute wet dog shit. But... I hate other cars more! Most of which are French.
  15. Oh yeah, well we’re already in tier 4 so there. Beat ya!
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