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juular

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  1. Like
    juular got a reaction from Datsuncog in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  2. Like
    juular reacted to Six-cylinder in Six Cylinders Motoring Notes - I know it was wrong but peer pressure is hard to resist!   
    The Past!
    The Dream!
    The Reality!
    Mrs6C said don’t do it, but I gave into peer pressure and bought a black 1984 Austin Mini Mayfair.
    The trouble is that it is a project that needs a lot of welding and as yet I have no idea if the engine and gearbox are any good. As it has not been on the road for 24 years I have to assume the brakes and exhaust will need attention and the interior has been exposed to the weather.
    Yes this car is a full restoration project and I said no more projects. If you can spare a few working brain cells please put them in a jam jar and send them to me!
    Now what, first off is to see if I can get it started which I am looking forward too.









  3. Haha
    juular reacted to egg in Six Cylinders Motoring Notes - I know it was wrong but peer pressure is hard to resist!   
    ooh blimey. Can I suggest the first part you need...

  4. Haha
  5. Thanks
    juular reacted to mercedade in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Between this and the 240, @juular maintains two of the finest threads on AS at the moment.
  6. Thanks
    juular reacted to loserone in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    And a very fine fleet!
  7. Like
    juular got a reaction from mat_the_cat in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  8. Like
    juular reacted to Dick Longbridge in Imagining cars that dont exist using AI...   
    Somewhere in Detroit 

  9. Like
    juular got a reaction from scdan4 in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  10. Like
    juular got a reaction from cort1977 in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  11. Like
    juular got a reaction from Rust Collector in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  12. Like
    juular got a reaction from Rust Collector in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  13. Like
    juular got a reaction from Rust Collector in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    @MrsJuular found a low profile USB adapter for the cigarette lighter that blends in really nicely, check it out below left. It's so discreet and easy to add/remove that I don't know if I will bother adding any USB ports.

  14. Like
    juular got a reaction from JakeT in Juular's Scandi Noir. Volvo C70, 240 &122. The 240 lives on.   
    Wait a second...

    No, really, @MrsJuular noticed that the Volvo branded spark plugs (which weren't cheap) looked like they were held together with glue.
    I was doing a (yet another) spark test with them all lying out on top of the engine block, except this time it was starting to get dark outside. This time I noticed how thin and crappy the spark looked, which prompted a closer look.
    Ironically I bought these spark plugs last year to try and sort the running issues that were likely caused by the burned #3 valve which I have now fixed. I hadn't thought those "genuine Volvo" plugs would contribute their own issues.
    So I chucked on an old set of NGK plugs I had lying in the boot, and...
     
    Running perfectly!
    MOT time now.
  15. Like
    juular reacted to Sunny Jim in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Loving your work. That car is a testament to your talent and perseverance.
  16. Like
    juular got a reaction from Tickman in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  17. Like
    juular got a reaction from CaptainBoom in Juular's Scandi Noir. Volvo C70, 240 &122. The 240 lives on.   
    Wait a second...

    No, really, @MrsJuular noticed that the Volvo branded spark plugs (which weren't cheap) looked like they were held together with glue.
    I was doing a (yet another) spark test with them all lying out on top of the engine block, except this time it was starting to get dark outside. This time I noticed how thin and crappy the spark looked, which prompted a closer look.
    Ironically I bought these spark plugs last year to try and sort the running issues that were likely caused by the burned #3 valve which I have now fixed. I hadn't thought those "genuine Volvo" plugs would contribute their own issues.
    So I chucked on an old set of NGK plugs I had lying in the boot, and...
     
    Running perfectly!
    MOT time now.
  18. Like
    juular got a reaction from Lacquer Peel in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  19. Like
    juular got a reaction from Popsicle in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  20. Like
    juular got a reaction from Popsicle in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  21. Like
    juular got a reaction from artdjones in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Some more stuff tackled. Trying to keep in my head all of the things I thought about fixing while on the Rustival trip. Writing notes? How quaint! Just stay awake at night trying to sift through jumbled thoughts until 3AM.
    It would probably be good to sort out the broken headlights.  Brief recap. A few weeks ago I fitted a latching relay which allowed me to control the full beam entirely through the flasher stalk instead of the antiquated floor switch. This worked brilliantly until it didn't.  Turns out that £3 of Chinese "INDUSTRIAL CONTROL" electronics aren't suited for, you know,  anything.  So the PCB basically melted (it wasn't even carrying notable current).  Before the Rustival trip I simply reinstated the floor dip switch to get us on the road.
    Turns out I wasn't wrong to try and get rid of the floor switch because as soon as it got dark, I went to switch between main and dip on a dual carriageway and lost all headlights. We pulled into a layby, consulted the wiring diagram, and crimped a couple of wires together so that we had headlights (but no mains).
    Time to fix that permanently.  
    The solution here is to use a 'proper' relay, in this case one designed for an old VW bus / beetle. The relay number is DNI 0127. There are also Meyle and Durite equivalents, so they are easily come by.
    Step 1, remove floor switch and hurl it into the depths of the garden.
    Step 2, crimp spades on the end of the wires to the floor switch.  Also tee-solder the smaller red wire into the bigger one, as that's more structurally sound than crimping two wires into one spade.

    Step 3, RELAY

    Here is the pinout.

    And here is what that looks like in real life.

    Step 4 : Replace the fuse you blew because you forgot to disconnect the battery, and touched the permanent +12V against the metal dash. Oh wait, there's no continental fuses left..  

    So it turns out this lighting setup is even better than the one I set up previously with the INDUSTRIAL CONTROL relay.  
    - When the dipped headlights are off, the flasher stalk operates as a main beam flasher.
    - When the dipped headlights are on, the flasher stalk toggles the main beam on and off like a modern car.
    - The relay also serves the purpose of being a relay for both the mains, flasher and dipped.  So it takes away the load from the light switch, provides full current to the headlights (brighter!)  plus it means I can remove the flasher relay and wiring in the engine bay as it is no longer required.
    So far this seems a far more robust and efficient setup, time will tell.
    Engine and gearbox mounts replaced.  The gearbox one was particularly hanging and the propshaft was bouncing off the bottom of the transmission tunnel.

    A set of high performance air filters attached.  The purpose being twofold. The generic SU HS6 pancakes I had on would sometimes smack against the clutch master cylinder reservoir on hard cornering or acceleration.  I also felt they were strangling the engine as they were so thin and miserable looking.  These by comparison are offset specifically to fit the Amazon, and are significantly more chunky.

     
    Y THO   |  Y THO

     
    Test drove this and was quite impressed.  The wishbone poly bushes have sharpened up the steering a fair bit. The engine and gearbox mounts have changed the gearshifts significantly, and overdrive seems to snick on in a much more dignified fashion. 
    A little bit of the induction roar from the pancakes has actually disappeared, but it still sounds great when opened up. I'll take it.
    Next up, I'll be fitting the sports exhaust, more polybushes, and doing a number of electrical upgrades to make it more reliable.
  22. Like
    juular got a reaction from Sunny Jim in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  23. Like
    juular got a reaction from Sunny Jim in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

  24. Like
    juular got a reaction from GrumpiusMaximus in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Just did a test drive there, it's going really well. Only casualty seems to be the temperature gauge not working. It looks like the actual sender on the engine has failed as it's gone completely open circuit, so a new one is on its way.
    Next up, I have more fun upgrades.
  25. Like
    juular got a reaction from GrumpiusMaximus in 1964 Volvo 122S - Amazonian rustforest. Electroshite.   
    Rewire complete. 

    Have made a few changes. The switched fusebox is fed from a master 100A relay which is triggered from the ignition key. This takes the heavy load off the ignition barrel which could get extremely hot with all of the current for all systems passing through it.
    The coil is fed straight off the barrel and is unfused, as it should be, so even if the relay fails the engine won't stop.
    Apart from that I made sure all cable ends had good quality spade connectors and heat shrink wrap with adhesive. This way they're pretty tough and reliable and eliminates some of the nasty and corroded original connectors.
    The engine bay is much cleaner now without the fusebox, relays, and associated wiring nests.

    Wiring for the reverse lights and overdrive now run inside, and I've packed the gap around the gearstick with insulation to cut down on road noise.

    Important upgrade done to the brake lights. The original brake light switch is a fluid pressure switch which tends to only activate when you're standing on the pedal. 
    I've changed it for an electrical pedal switch, which needed a bracket made up.

    A real pain to drill the bolt holes for this in the pedal box so the top hole is in at an awkward angle.

    Still it does the trick and is a massive upgrade. The lights now come on as soon as you touch the pedal.
    While the steering wheel was off I swapped the steering column coupling bush as it was really sloppy.


    The steering column shroud also got a coat of paint after I did some repairs to the cracking brittle plastic with some epoxy.


    Last few bits done inside. A new hazard switch.

    I then remembered I bought a set of instrument panel stickers off Demon Tweeks.

    So I then did what I originally meant to and sorted the dash light graphics.
    Before.

    After.

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