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JimH

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  1. Like
    JimH got a reaction from 3VOM in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  2. Like
    JimH got a reaction from egg in Cars, Lasses and Lads - A Photo Sharing Thread   
  3. Haha
    JimH got a reaction from CreepingJesus in Cars, Lasses and Lads - A Photo Sharing Thread   
  4. Like
    JimH got a reaction from DeeJay in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    You think you have done a lot and things have moved on but when you start waving the camera around you see it all looks about the same as last time. This is the frame and pivot for the spare wheel installed. There now needs to be a draw bolt and bracket made to hold it in position which is currently being done by a ratchet strap. 
     
    The bunker lids were fitted and trimmed to length and then finished off with D beading to the edge and a trim strip top and bottom. No1 apprentice did the fitting of the steel trims. 
     
    And this is the start of the linings in the body. The roof isn't getting lined because we don't want to hide those steam bent beams that took so much effort to do. The joints will get covered up with hardwood strips. 
     
    The mirrors on these things are worse than useless and people do have a habit of driving touching the water tank so you have no idea who is behind you. As a result we use a rear facing camera which is fine on the S because there is a handy glovebox in front of you to hide the screen. The Supers have no sort of dashboard so something needs to be made up. Another benefit of this is that it gives somewhere to put an additional pressure gauge where the drive can see it without turning their head to the side - you really need to watch the pressure gauge to drive these thing properly. However, it also need to look at least a bit not crap so I've come up with something that sits just under the windscreen  and also lets the camera screen and pressure gauge sit recessed so it isn't hideously obvious when you open the cab door. This is the recessed panel waiting to be welded in. 
     
    This is door number 2 ready to go in. These took forever to do and are oak framed and lined with steel faced plywood so it should look good and keep paint on it rather than using aluminum which the original drawing called for. It is not light at all.
     
    And this is door number 1 in place so I could measure up door number two. The brackets at the bottom is holding it in place temporarily. If I were to do this again I would make the lower rail deeper than it is because I think that would look better. However, I am not making doors like this ever again. 
     
    I was very, very pleased with this gap.
     
    What you probably notice is there are no hinges. This is because they haven't been made yet. This little jet cut bits are the start of the hinges.
     
    As well as the doors getting nearly done the trim strips started getting fitted. These tidy the corners up and cover the joins in the plywood. Unfortunately when there is a big contrast in the colours of the various bits the damn thing looks even more like a packing case. That should get toned down once it is all the same colour. Note the untrimmed canvas hanging over the front of the cab. Gluing that down took 8 litres of Evo Stik 528 applied on a hot day with not much ventilation. We had to keep going outside for a breather. 
     
    I was quite pleased with the rear mudguard cutaway trim. All trims need to come off again to glue them on with epoxy so water doesn't get behind them. Not looking forward to that job. On top of that we were 3 lengths of poplar short for the other side so we decided to get the same trims for the external boxes which will get slung under the body. Great, now we are 45 lengths short. 
     
    No 1 apprentice got the lovely job of sorting out the rough castings for the maker's plates. This is the second one after filing and taping.
     
    And this is the first one after that plus buffing and sitting for hours painting them. Now we need to find someone who can engrave the waggon number on them. 
     
    And that is about your lot. Next time it will look even more similar. 
    In other news the Transit engine was rebuilt and after some farting around with the vapouriser for the DPF it seems just fine now. Oh, and it got a pair of new rear wheels, wheel nuts and wheel studs. Don't ask.
  5. Like
    JimH got a reaction from puddlethumper in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  6. Like
    JimH got a reaction from rml2345 in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  7. Like
    JimH got a reaction from busmansholiday in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There were a few people who bought a fair few of these things as scrappers and they just sort of hung around in their yards. In this one's case there were four wrecks bought by a business and just sat around. Three of the four got saved and the fourth - our one - had the engine bought by Mr Keeley as a spare and the rest went in the melting pot. We have one photograph of GD 9834 taken in the 1950s in the yard prior to being broken up still in its Taroads livery (if it can be called that) who was the last commercial user of the waggon. There are also a few people who are able to recall the waggon in the yard with the others. 
    After that you are struggling  - waggon numbers only appeared on a pair of brass plates bolted to the cab and maker's marks on parts was virtually unheard of with the exception of the odd pattern ID number which appears on a tiny handful of components. All you can hope for is that at some point in its working life someone bashed some identifying marks on some part they were working on. In the case of Sentinels they had a reasonably extensive regional workshop network (for the time) so the odds of a waggon finding its way into a shed where there were lots of other Sentinels was quite high. The photo (which I can't find at the moment - someone has been sorting folders out) shows GD 9834 sitting on pneumatics which was a conversions most commonly carried out by Sentinel or their agents. The upshot of this is that you are in with a decent chance of finding waggon number stamps on a bit of the engine or transmission. Fortunately we found a pair of waggon number marks in old style stamps on the main bearing housings. 
    So, not exactly a watertight case but very much more watertight that some that have gone on recently involving little bits of boilers that were found in woods. Ho hum.
  8. Like
    JimH got a reaction from busmansholiday in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  9. Like
    JimH got a reaction from busmansholiday in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    You think you have done a lot and things have moved on but when you start waving the camera around you see it all looks about the same as last time. This is the frame and pivot for the spare wheel installed. There now needs to be a draw bolt and bracket made to hold it in position which is currently being done by a ratchet strap. 
     
    The bunker lids were fitted and trimmed to length and then finished off with D beading to the edge and a trim strip top and bottom. No1 apprentice did the fitting of the steel trims. 
     
    And this is the start of the linings in the body. The roof isn't getting lined because we don't want to hide those steam bent beams that took so much effort to do. The joints will get covered up with hardwood strips. 
     
    The mirrors on these things are worse than useless and people do have a habit of driving touching the water tank so you have no idea who is behind you. As a result we use a rear facing camera which is fine on the S because there is a handy glovebox in front of you to hide the screen. The Supers have no sort of dashboard so something needs to be made up. Another benefit of this is that it gives somewhere to put an additional pressure gauge where the drive can see it without turning their head to the side - you really need to watch the pressure gauge to drive these thing properly. However, it also need to look at least a bit not crap so I've come up with something that sits just under the windscreen  and also lets the camera screen and pressure gauge sit recessed so it isn't hideously obvious when you open the cab door. This is the recessed panel waiting to be welded in. 
     
    This is door number 2 ready to go in. These took forever to do and are oak framed and lined with steel faced plywood so it should look good and keep paint on it rather than using aluminum which the original drawing called for. It is not light at all.
     
    And this is door number 1 in place so I could measure up door number two. The brackets at the bottom is holding it in place temporarily. If I were to do this again I would make the lower rail deeper than it is because I think that would look better. However, I am not making doors like this ever again. 
     
    I was very, very pleased with this gap.
     
    What you probably notice is there are no hinges. This is because they haven't been made yet. This little jet cut bits are the start of the hinges.
     
    As well as the doors getting nearly done the trim strips started getting fitted. These tidy the corners up and cover the joins in the plywood. Unfortunately when there is a big contrast in the colours of the various bits the damn thing looks even more like a packing case. That should get toned down once it is all the same colour. Note the untrimmed canvas hanging over the front of the cab. Gluing that down took 8 litres of Evo Stik 528 applied on a hot day with not much ventilation. We had to keep going outside for a breather. 
     
    I was quite pleased with the rear mudguard cutaway trim. All trims need to come off again to glue them on with epoxy so water doesn't get behind them. Not looking forward to that job. On top of that we were 3 lengths of poplar short for the other side so we decided to get the same trims for the external boxes which will get slung under the body. Great, now we are 45 lengths short. 
     
    No 1 apprentice got the lovely job of sorting out the rough castings for the maker's plates. This is the second one after filing and taping.
     
    And this is the first one after that plus buffing and sitting for hours painting them. Now we need to find someone who can engrave the waggon number on them. 
     
    And that is about your lot. Next time it will look even more similar. 
    In other news the Transit engine was rebuilt and after some farting around with the vapouriser for the DPF it seems just fine now. Oh, and it got a pair of new rear wheels, wheel nuts and wheel studs. Don't ask.
  10. Like
    JimH got a reaction from busmansholiday in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There is still stuff going on but certain jobs are taking forever. One job that took an age was to epoxy the steel sheets onto the sides of the body. The original design specified Plymax aluminium clad sheets but these days you can't really buy Plymax unless you want a building's worth manufactured to your spec. The other problem I had with using plymax was that you would need to screw through the boards which would leave hundreds of screw heads to fill and I really didn't think that was going to stay looking good for any length of time. So our approach was to building the body then glue the steel (easier to keep paint on them) sheets onto the ply sides using epoxy. 
    This meant screwing battens up to rest the sheet on and then try as best we could to keep it pressed to the side while the glue went off. Working with any sort of sticky stuff over that sort of area is a messy job and when you are balanced on a scaffold working vertically then things get even messier. My overalls now stand up by themselves. 
    The finished job
     
    The edges of the panels are screwed in place and then there are 2x1/2" trims in tulipwood to tidy up the edges, corners and joins in the sheets. It doesn't really come across in the photo but the sides are very, very flat. The other side is done as well so we are nearly done with epoxy. 
    The inside got primered and undercoated which made everything look much more jolly
     
    And then it got top coated which made it look less primrosey. No1 apprentice did most of this which is handy because there is a lot to paint and you have very little room to move. An exciting, interesting job it is not. However, it looks much nicer than bare wood. 
     
    This is the other job that is being painfully slow - the rear doors. Most of the designs for Sentinel bodies used the standard flat bed tail gate with a pair of doors filling in the upper two thirds. Not very dissimilar to this one here
     
    The problem with this set up is that it would work really well in a loading bay but living with it as something to play with would be a bloody nightmare because each time you needed to get in the back you would have to both lower the tailgate and open a door and I just knew that what you would end up doing is opening the tailgate, scrambling onto the now horizontal gate the limbo under the top door without opening it. The other massive problem with this design is that I would have to make both a pair of doors and the tailgate and even more hinges. If I had to make a pair of doors than I may as well make two slightly longer doors and that should seriously reduce the number of bits I could make a mess of. 
    The other thing I've never taken to is the chevron boarding that was common on such doors. The sides were smooth so the back doors should look the same so in the hope of keeping things flatter I was going to line the doors with 3/4" marine ply with sheet steel glued to it set in an oak frame. 
    And that is what I have been doing for the past few weeks. Just to make everything easier the top of the doors are curved to sit inside the curved roof beams. There are then a couple of ledges to take the top two hingers and it was all designed so the marine ply is fixed in from the rear once the steel is glued to it. This is the story so far lying rear face upwards so you can see the rebate for the ply.  
     
    Another view. The bit of wood in the middle running top to bottom is just lying there. It's actually one of the diagonal braces which will get fitted once the plywood is in place. Of course the best thing about this kind of job is that once you have made one you get to make another one all over again. Something to look forward to, anyway. 
     
    After that we need to work out some vaguely period looking hinges and catches. And probably some sort of safety device to limit the movement of the doors if the wind catches them. They aren't massively heavy but there is a fair sail area. 
    What else have we been up to? A few weeks back we took a drive to visit @nacho man who was kind enough to sell us 50kw of winter motivation. We've been after one of these for a while. They don't come on the market very often and this one is lovely. The ducting hasn't arrived to point one of the outlets into the middle workshop. It is so much easier to get yourself fired up to do some work when the workshop is warm. 
     
    And this was the other job. Find out why the Transit was drinking oil. Not the easiest thing in the whole world to remove. 
     
    It looked like it had had some work done not long before it was demobbed from emergency pothole patching duties such as a new clutch and cam chain and it bore the marks of having corners cut - half the bolts holding the gearbox to the bell housing missing, for example. 
     
    Nothing wildly exciting to report other than wear on the pistons and rings which doesn't seem too grim for 185K. Big ends and mains measure (and look) as good as the day they went in. 
     
    When the new pistons and shells arrive it can get popped back together. Everything else is already here. 
    And that is about it. Don't expect too much progress because the doors have a while to go yet. And I have a big pile of windows to fit. 
  11. Like
    JimH got a reaction from busmansholiday in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    It's been a while since the last update. Painting things, deciding it was the wrong paint, watching videos on Youtube by coach painters, finding the very much right paint, finding out that one of the few people who stocked it was just down the road in Falkirk, waiting for it to arrive and putting it on soaked up a bit of time. The other thing now is that there are fewer jobs to do and they all run through one path or another means that things slow down a bit. 
    When we made the rear axle we ordered a bit of bar which was about six inches too short. Fortunately someone who has helped out a lot on this job needed a new rear axle for his Aveling tractor and the now scrap bar was just the rightish size so it got turned into a nice new axle. To say that Aveling's engineering prowess was not exactly brilliant so it took a lot of blood, sweat and tears to get everything fitted just right. Making crude things work is always hard work. 
     
    I know lots of people like these things but I really don't. The hammer and chisel engineering involved makes me cross. This is the winch drum hub which also acts as the drive for the nearside wheel. To make the axle drive the wheel you stick a big pin into one of those four big holes. It's just too agricultural for my liking. 
     
    Back to the slightly more sophisticated end of the market this is the not exactly sophisticated arm for the spare wheel. This is suspended from the body and lets you swing the wheel out of the way. All of the spare wheel carriers were a bit Heath Robinson because on the Supers and many DGs were converted to pneumatics. It is nowhere near finished by the way. 
     
    And this is the start of the bracket that it will hang from. When it has been machined it will get "roughed up" so it looks more like a casting. It is bolted underneath the body where you can't see it so it isn't that big a deal.
     
    And here is the first sign of some colour. Once the front of the body and the back of the cab were painted the body could be dropped back into place. Or at least lowered gently into place. I haven't made my peace with crimson lake yet because I still wanted it to be green. Apparently the estimate of £7K plus VAT for the gold leaf said it wasn't going to be Boots. Shame.
    You may also notice that once the body was back on it was possible to do the roof. The front edge looks like crap because I will trim the front and rear once everything is fixed down. The batten crudely screwed to the side is the temporary support while the first sheet of steel is glued on. 
     
    The roof is quite big. I am not looking forward to gluing the duck canvas on. I think we'll pull it outside to do that. The curve doesn't look too bad and when you run an eye from one end to the other we got the beams pretty true. It would have been nice to have built all of this on the floor and then lifted it on but then it would also be nice to have a big travelling crane which we don't.  
     
    And inside it's a fairly big space. The sides and front are going to be lined with ply so you won't see the angle brackets between the horizontals and the uprights. However, the roof isn't getting lined because I want to at least leave a bit of evidence that it got built right. Inside is going to be painted the same sandy beige as the inside of the cab. 
     
    Go on, be a bit impressed. I'm bloody amazed I got things this tight and generally not looking like complete shite. I don't know whether the steel stiffener under the beam was needed but No1 apprentice was happy to stand making them, they are going to get covered up by the ply lining and I doubt that they are doing any harm. 
     
    And the other side. A bit of space will be taken up by the water tanks but there is still loads of room for some reason or other.
     
    And that is about it. The next big job is to make the bloody rear doors which I am really not looking forward to because there is no hiding place for any mistakes with them.
     
    As an aside, I don't go on about my shitters very often but here's  a little tip I discovered this week. If you have scrawled a post it note on a filing cabinet that the MOT is due 11/04/22 that does not mean that the MOT expires on the 22nd of April <red face>. This is the TT I bought from @Jamie a while back and it is still going strong. It is just sitting here waiting for a replacement O2 probe and a pair of rear tyres so it can go for a slightly late MOT. 
     
  12. Like
    JimH got a reaction from LightBulbFun in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There were a few people who bought a fair few of these things as scrappers and they just sort of hung around in their yards. In this one's case there were four wrecks bought by a business and just sat around. Three of the four got saved and the fourth - our one - had the engine bought by Mr Keeley as a spare and the rest went in the melting pot. We have one photograph of GD 9834 taken in the 1950s in the yard prior to being broken up still in its Taroads livery (if it can be called that) who was the last commercial user of the waggon. There are also a few people who are able to recall the waggon in the yard with the others. 
    After that you are struggling  - waggon numbers only appeared on a pair of brass plates bolted to the cab and maker's marks on parts was virtually unheard of with the exception of the odd pattern ID number which appears on a tiny handful of components. All you can hope for is that at some point in its working life someone bashed some identifying marks on some part they were working on. In the case of Sentinels they had a reasonably extensive regional workshop network (for the time) so the odds of a waggon finding its way into a shed where there were lots of other Sentinels was quite high. The photo (which I can't find at the moment - someone has been sorting folders out) shows GD 9834 sitting on pneumatics which was a conversions most commonly carried out by Sentinel or their agents. The upshot of this is that you are in with a decent chance of finding waggon number stamps on a bit of the engine or transmission. Fortunately we found a pair of waggon number marks in old style stamps on the main bearing housings. 
    So, not exactly a watertight case but very much more watertight that some that have gone on recently involving little bits of boilers that were found in woods. Ho hum.
  13. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Datsuncog in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There were a few people who bought a fair few of these things as scrappers and they just sort of hung around in their yards. In this one's case there were four wrecks bought by a business and just sat around. Three of the four got saved and the fourth - our one - had the engine bought by Mr Keeley as a spare and the rest went in the melting pot. We have one photograph of GD 9834 taken in the 1950s in the yard prior to being broken up still in its Taroads livery (if it can be called that) who was the last commercial user of the waggon. There are also a few people who are able to recall the waggon in the yard with the others. 
    After that you are struggling  - waggon numbers only appeared on a pair of brass plates bolted to the cab and maker's marks on parts was virtually unheard of with the exception of the odd pattern ID number which appears on a tiny handful of components. All you can hope for is that at some point in its working life someone bashed some identifying marks on some part they were working on. In the case of Sentinels they had a reasonably extensive regional workshop network (for the time) so the odds of a waggon finding its way into a shed where there were lots of other Sentinels was quite high. The photo (which I can't find at the moment - someone has been sorting folders out) shows GD 9834 sitting on pneumatics which was a conversions most commonly carried out by Sentinel or their agents. The upshot of this is that you are in with a decent chance of finding waggon number stamps on a bit of the engine or transmission. Fortunately we found a pair of waggon number marks in old style stamps on the main bearing housings. 
    So, not exactly a watertight case but very much more watertight that some that have gone on recently involving little bits of boilers that were found in woods. Ho hum.
  14. Like
    JimH got a reaction from DodgeRover in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There were a few people who bought a fair few of these things as scrappers and they just sort of hung around in their yards. In this one's case there were four wrecks bought by a business and just sat around. Three of the four got saved and the fourth - our one - had the engine bought by Mr Keeley as a spare and the rest went in the melting pot. We have one photograph of GD 9834 taken in the 1950s in the yard prior to being broken up still in its Taroads livery (if it can be called that) who was the last commercial user of the waggon. There are also a few people who are able to recall the waggon in the yard with the others. 
    After that you are struggling  - waggon numbers only appeared on a pair of brass plates bolted to the cab and maker's marks on parts was virtually unheard of with the exception of the odd pattern ID number which appears on a tiny handful of components. All you can hope for is that at some point in its working life someone bashed some identifying marks on some part they were working on. In the case of Sentinels they had a reasonably extensive regional workshop network (for the time) so the odds of a waggon finding its way into a shed where there were lots of other Sentinels was quite high. The photo (which I can't find at the moment - someone has been sorting folders out) shows GD 9834 sitting on pneumatics which was a conversions most commonly carried out by Sentinel or their agents. The upshot of this is that you are in with a decent chance of finding waggon number stamps on a bit of the engine or transmission. Fortunately we found a pair of waggon number marks in old style stamps on the main bearing housings. 
    So, not exactly a watertight case but very much more watertight that some that have gone on recently involving little bits of boilers that were found in woods. Ho hum.
  15. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Dyslexic Viking in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    There were a few people who bought a fair few of these things as scrappers and they just sort of hung around in their yards. In this one's case there were four wrecks bought by a business and just sat around. Three of the four got saved and the fourth - our one - had the engine bought by Mr Keeley as a spare and the rest went in the melting pot. We have one photograph of GD 9834 taken in the 1950s in the yard prior to being broken up still in its Taroads livery (if it can be called that) who was the last commercial user of the waggon. There are also a few people who are able to recall the waggon in the yard with the others. 
    After that you are struggling  - waggon numbers only appeared on a pair of brass plates bolted to the cab and maker's marks on parts was virtually unheard of with the exception of the odd pattern ID number which appears on a tiny handful of components. All you can hope for is that at some point in its working life someone bashed some identifying marks on some part they were working on. In the case of Sentinels they had a reasonably extensive regional workshop network (for the time) so the odds of a waggon finding its way into a shed where there were lots of other Sentinels was quite high. The photo (which I can't find at the moment - someone has been sorting folders out) shows GD 9834 sitting on pneumatics which was a conversions most commonly carried out by Sentinel or their agents. The upshot of this is that you are in with a decent chance of finding waggon number stamps on a bit of the engine or transmission. Fortunately we found a pair of waggon number marks in old style stamps on the main bearing housings. 
    So, not exactly a watertight case but very much more watertight that some that have gone on recently involving little bits of boilers that were found in woods. Ho hum.
  16. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Mally in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
  17. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Mally in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  18. Like
    JimH got a reaction from nomiST in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  19. Like
    JimH got a reaction from UltraWomble in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
  20. Like
    JimH got a reaction from UltraWomble in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  21. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Supernaut in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    Just a couple of happy snaps. We needed a photograph of the waggon to accompany the application for the registration so a load of bits got slapped on to make it look more finished. Just thought you might like to see it looking vaguely nearly there.
    Windscreens in, lamps sort of on, front wings perched in place and looking somewhere near complete. The body trims are partially missing because I'd taken them all off and was epoxying them back in place at the time. The lamps are Lucas King of the Road shells and bezels with modern sealed beam units grafted in. They don't look quite right but old solenoid dip lamps are pretty much useless on the road and you really need to see what the road is doing in this thing. The side lights which are mounted where they are meant to be beside the windscreens but they have orange LED bulbs in them and act as the indicators. Side lamps are now in the headlamps.

    And from the other side - a pair of Sentinels. Note the number plate now fitted to the front. We just don't know what is going to be painted on it yet. 
     
    And as things get closer to finished the jobs to do list gets longer. Once this lot is ticked off it should be hey ho for the open road. 
     
    Getting there...
  22. Like
    JimH got a reaction from CreepingJesus in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
  23. Like
    JimH got a reaction from LightBulbFun in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
  24. Like
    JimH got a reaction from Datsuncog in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
  25. Like
    JimH got a reaction from mk2_craig in It is just so Super (Sentinel).   
    We had three age related plates issued in the past DS 7206, SV5525 and 163 XUP. I didn't mind DS or XUP but I hated the SV one for some reason. Either BF or WC would be good with me.
    However, the initial attempt will be to retrieve the plate that was connected to the engine and transmission unit (GD 9834). We feel that we have put a reasonably plausible argument together (and much better than some of the downright blatant frauds that have gone on recently) so fingers crossed and all that. 
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