Jump to content

Broadsword

Full Members
  • Posts

    2,303
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shite Ron in Keys & Keyrings   
    I like to get a good period correct key ring for any of my more interesting cars.
  2. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Semi-C in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    You are quite right. Time for a long overdue fleet update.
    Due to the big project that involves a roof over the head and maybe even a garage to work in, I have been shuffling a great many things around and finishing up as much project work as possible. Cars have arrived, but more car have sold and even more cars are to go.
    Things that came and went over the past six months that didn't even make it to the thread were a Saab and Mazda MX-5 NA (which turned out to be more valuable than expected being a limited edition). Done, box ticked etc. Moving on.
    The Lupo. I was umming and arring about a replacement, but it ended up passing the MOT no danger. I've serviced it and have new rear shocks to go on it. Other than that it will need a cam belt in a few thousand miles. At this point it has paid for itself at least twice over. I might as well keep using it as it's impossibly inexpensive to run. Hopefully it will not rot out or anything like that. No bad comments from my trusted MOT station yet and I certainly can't prod holes in it where surface rust exists.
    The Range Rover continues to be very useful. It's currently doing house clearance duties, and has saved a lot of hassling paying someone or hiring another vehicle. It's started to grumble on very cold starts due to the sheer amount of running around, but I hope a good service will sort it out. I have the service parts ready to go. Today I also ordered a full set of Goodyear Wrangler all-weather tyres for it, and I'm quite excited to see how they do. The current tyres on the Rangie are old and rock hard. A combination of a spare Halfords voucher, a 15% off promotion and free fitting at my home address brought the price down to £326, which I think is quite good.
    The Herald is basically done. On the road running, driving bumbling around. I have tried to sell it, but the timing was hardly ideal so took it off the market for a while. I will give it a nice polish and fix a few details ahead of putting it on sale again. It was a big and tiring project.
    The Porsche I'm not working on at the moment. It needs a lot of welding to get it right as mentioned earlier. I won't take it for an MOT before it's all done properly. I already have new outer sills for it. I have very recently been practicing welding on another car...
    Which brings me onto the Jaaaaaag situation. I bravely sold both my nice Jags a few month's ago. Problem is when you have cash in the bank that shouldn't be touched but no Jags, I seem to end up with more Jags. It took precisely 20 minutes from the XJR6 selling to me spotting a exceedingly poorly advertised replacement XJR6 that ended up with me. It was just out of MOT, looking sorry for itself, not running right and was missing a idler pulley. However, it was in turquoise and quite tidy. I bought it and had it shipped home after looking at a manual 4.0 Sport which was in absolutely shocking condition but somehow had an MOT.
    This is where things get more complicated. It only took about a day to get the turquoise car running spot on and soon it had any other issues sorted. In short it is far better than you could have anticipated. Great! Then the Holy Grail falls into my lap (well, my twisted idea of the Holy Grail); an XJR6 manual. The manual was local to me and I knew the owner. Note it's not a factory manual, it has been converted using original part from a donor 4.0 Sport manual. I had no idea it was coming up for sale, but spotted it on eBay one day and managed to get to it first (there were plenty of people wanting it). The car was in a state and again out of MOT, but mechanically good, and respectable. So I bought that too. At this point the fleet reduction procedure was not going well, having landed two more Jags without MOTs. Wanting to crack on it was decided to drive both XJR6s in convoy for back to back MOTs. This made me rather anxious, imagining two long failure sheets. The gods of Autoshite smiled that day however and the manual car failed only on an exhaust leak, and the turquoise car on a small amount of welding, a lightbulb and handbrake on one side.
    Long story short on the Jags, a week later the manual car had and MOT as was on the road. The truquoise car took longer only becuase no-one would do the welding. In the end I did the welding myself. After a tentative start it all ended up going well. I took it for an MOT again today and I was told my welding was good. Also the car drives lovely. I'm dead pleased! I will use the skills acquired on the the Porsche.
    That brings us up to now and I'm well ahead with project work. The Herald and turquoise car have to go to get over the line with the accomodation project, then I can service the core fleet. The plan is to hold on to the manual car and bring it back from the rather messy state it is currently in. It is missing it's sunroof, and most of the interior is in boxes. There is no headlining and there is also a misfire that needs chasing down. It is well worth the effort though. The car was converted from auto to manual at great expense and all the nasty jobs related to that side of things is done. Also the mileage is only 100k and it's very solid. It will take time to get all the bits together to make it look ok, but I'll get there. It isn't urgent or worth stressing about. Similar story with the Porsche. I will get it in a garage and slowly weld it up, cutting out all the old MOT patches and starting afresh.
    What do we all think?











  3. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Fumbler in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    In the aftermath of the Rover’s demise, this is my analysis of the sequence of events.. Either one of the engine accessories or the auxiliary belt tensioner locked up leading to partial shredding of the the auxiliary belt. Parts of the auxiliary belt found their way into the cam belt housing, locking it up and partially damaging the cam belt. This immediately bounced the valves and trashed the head, possibly the pistons too. Incidentally the fuel system is full of rust but this wasn’t actually causing a running issue. Whoever did the major work on then car knew the fuel tank was rusty and cleaned it up as best they could but it deteriorated. It just isn’t worth the time and money to try and put it right. It will just get messier and messier. I’ve booked the car to get to get collected for scrap next Wednesday. Disappointing, but one has to take the tougher with the smooth.
    Speaking of which. I took the latest XJR manual in for an MOT. Boy oh boy does it look incongruous. The story underneath is quite different though. No rust, no problems at all really. It doesn’t even leak. It passed easily, which was a delight on a Friday afternoon.
    Next job for the red shed Jag is to get the gearbox out and assess the clutch. At the very least it needs a release bearing but probably a whole clutch. You can’t buy a direct fit clutch kit for these anymore. More on that later.
     
     
     





  4. Sad
    Broadsword got a reaction from AnnoyingPentium in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Things unravelled with the Rover upon digging into the FTP. First I noticed no fuel was getting through and the tank is full off rust/debris, all the way to the injector pump (so there is debris past the fuel filter). Then looking at the timing belt is has slipped and shredded partially along with the auxiliary belt. There is loud clack noise from the head when you rotate the engine by hand so there is major engine damage for sure. The little bit it did run sounded like 1 cylinder.. Anyway I need a car that I can rely on and given the Rover has already had a new head, I think some underlying issue was not figured out when it got worked on by a previous owner. It's going to get scrapped. Shame really it was spot on right up till the moment it grenaded, and was a nice drive.
     
  5. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Dave_Q in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    In the aftermath of the Rover’s demise, this is my analysis of the sequence of events.. Either one of the engine accessories or the auxiliary belt tensioner locked up leading to partial shredding of the the auxiliary belt. Parts of the auxiliary belt found their way into the cam belt housing, locking it up and partially damaging the cam belt. This immediately bounced the valves and trashed the head, possibly the pistons too. Incidentally the fuel system is full of rust but this wasn’t actually causing a running issue. Whoever did the major work on then car knew the fuel tank was rusty and cleaned it up as best they could but it deteriorated. It just isn’t worth the time and money to try and put it right. It will just get messier and messier. I’ve booked the car to get to get collected for scrap next Wednesday. Disappointing, but one has to take the tougher with the smooth.
    Speaking of which. I took the latest XJR manual in for an MOT. Boy oh boy does it look incongruous. The story underneath is quite different though. No rust, no problems at all really. It doesn’t even leak. It passed easily, which was a delight on a Friday afternoon.
    Next job for the red shed Jag is to get the gearbox out and assess the clutch. At the very least it needs a release bearing but probably a whole clutch. You can’t buy a direct fit clutch kit for these anymore. More on that later.
     
     
     





  6. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from GrumpiusMaximus in Shirley Knott's Evil Web Of Shite - Volvo gets a clean sheet MOT, now on to wheel trims, thermostat and brakes revisited   
    I don’t think there is a successor to your Gold SDI as such, so I’d be tempered to keep it going as long as possible. Even in it’s current state it will probably give less trouble than a modern.
  7. Thanks
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Shirley Knott's Evil Web Of Shite - Volvo gets a clean sheet MOT, now on to wheel trims, thermostat and brakes revisited   
    I don’t think there is a successor to your Gold SDI as such, so I’d be tempered to keep it going as long as possible. Even in it’s current state it will probably give less trouble than a modern.
  8. Like
    Broadsword reacted to Shirley Knott in Shirley Knott's Evil Web Of Shite - Volvo gets a clean sheet MOT, now on to wheel trims, thermostat and brakes revisited   
    Probably not. It's  not too bad underneath,  but bodywork wise....

    Bear in mind all of these areas have been rubbed back, 'converted' with hydrate 80 then painted with zinc primer and top coat every year for the last 5 years... It used to take a long time for the grot to come back, these days the rusts coming through again a couple of months after treatment. 
    Northern England puts one hand on each ear of cars, and then repeatedly fucks them in the face with a shaft made from pure corrosion.
    Pretty soon this one's going to need big ugly plates welding all over it, and that's always the beginning of the end IME. That being said, there's probably a couple of years of life left.
  9. Like
    Broadsword reacted to Shirley Knott in Shirley Knott's Evil Web Of Shite - Volvo gets a clean sheet MOT, now on to wheel trims, thermostat and brakes revisited   
    Time for a quick update here- More for my own records than anything else.
    At present the 'fleet' is still down to just two cars, the funny thing is they're both pretty much 20 years old and used as daily drivers, so things can be (And often are) challenging.
    Volvo V70 -  Nothing to report other,  than the time around a month back when the spring seat separated itself from the body of the strut and rocketed its way into the front tyre locking the drivers side up. 
    To add to the fun, I was mid way through driving the boy to school. This was the first time in my life I've ever had to be recovered, and after a few days at a local garage the Ovlov now boasts new front shocks (Both sides)
    GOLF SDi- Various work done on this one since the last update... From memory,  a new rear flexi, brake line, rear discs and pads and a couple of new tyres.
    Given its capable of the best MPGs, its the vehicle of choice and is currently covering around 500 miles a week.
    Unfortunately the rust is now starting to take hold and I honestly recon I'll be lucky to get another couple of years out of it. The love is still strong for it in spite of this, today it was lovingly provided with an oil and filter change, 187,548 hard northern  miles deep at this stage.
     

     
     
  10. Like
    Broadsword reacted to Shirley Knott in Shirley Knott's Evil Web Of Shite - Volvo gets a clean sheet MOT, now on to wheel trims, thermostat and brakes revisited   
    That's it, exactly right, and still never been welded.
    It's done getting on for 190k and achieved 50-60 mpg throughout and is still manages to cover 500 miles a week. As far as I'm aware it's on the original injectors and fuel pump. No DMF/DPF/turbo issues as it doesn't have any of these things.
    I'll be very sad to see it go when the time comes 😔 
    I started a thread about a week ago in the 'Ask a shiter' section to try to find a spiritual successor, and the conclusion was pretty much that nobody makes a car like this these days (Least of all Volkswagen) Sad times... I'll probably give it a viking funeral in It's last year by running it on veg and playing Pink Floyd's 'Time' on repeat on the CD deck.
     
  11. Like
    Broadsword reacted to loserone in A car that no one here has owned or driven?   
    @Broadsword, collecting, not yesterday 


  12. Sad
    Broadsword got a reaction from mercedade in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Things unravelled with the Rover upon digging into the FTP. First I noticed no fuel was getting through and the tank is full off rust/debris, all the way to the injector pump (so there is debris past the fuel filter). Then looking at the timing belt is has slipped and shredded partially along with the auxiliary belt. There is loud clack noise from the head when you rotate the engine by hand so there is major engine damage for sure. The little bit it did run sounded like 1 cylinder.. Anyway I need a car that I can rely on and given the Rover has already had a new head, I think some underlying issue was not figured out when it got worked on by a previous owner. It's going to get scrapped. Shame really it was spot on right up till the moment it grenaded, and was a nice drive.
     
  13. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from mercedade in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    After a day checking the latest Jag over, it’s on the road!
    First I had a good prod underneath to assess the rot. The special prodding tool failed to penetrate the chassis, which was nice. It’s a strange situation where the scabbiness is on top but it’s actually solid in all the right places. A good start to the day.
    Then the gear linkage. It took about an hour. I used the old bushings from NLW which were about 1000% more effective at being bushings than thin air. Suddenly the gearshift felt fantastic. It actually feels nicer than on NLW but now I realise you need that weighted knob to make it work properly. Excellent result!
    Next the clutch hydraulics. I was very suspicious of the master cylinder. Not for nothing. It was rusty on the inside. Once the old master was off I thought I’d be clever and bench bleed the brand new replacement that came with the car. I had a cap for the hard line to blank the system off while I swapped things around. Everything came off easy and bench bleeding the master was a breeze. I was expecting to be driving the car by mid afternoon. Then I realised the new master cylinder is 180 degrees out from the old one, and the line wouldn’t fit. Bugger! A trip to Halfords for some a pipe cutter and bender got me back on track. I just about managed to reroute and re-flare everything and get the system buttoned up as the sun was setting. It still needs bleeding but there was a pedal.
    I was quite happy at this point. The car up and running and on the road in a day was a good result. Initial observations: the clutch release bearing is done but the clutch and gearbox and fantastic. The engine is also amazingly good. They not all have a bit of a misfire and stuck throttle but this was fine. A bit of an exhaust blow but that is just a badly fitted centre section.
    The car actually drives well, completely contrary to its appearance. So well it might in fact pass an MOT. More prodding tomorrow but so far so good.
    I’ll have to think hard about the clutch. I don’t think I can get the gearbox in and out with my facilities. There is no way to get an OEM new clutch kit. My options are to just replace the bearing, which I can get or convert to a single mass flywheel setup so that I can install the clutch out of an XJS. I need to find someone trusted who can get the gearbox out. This is much harder than getting the bits!

     





  14. Like
    Broadsword reacted to Crispian_J_Hotson in Jaguar S Bype R - An Imposter, saving a bird, and that effin supercharger!   
    Progress report #947...
    I thought that I'd take a closer look in trying to ease on the exhaust manifold situation. As it is, it's rough. Pulling away emits the characteristic chuff and it sounds painful. I still need the car for a bit so with nothing to lose, attempted to improve on the situation today.
    The locknut that is unwound on the manifold was carefully removed, it left the stud behind. Threads were checked and it all looked fine. So, not wanting to snap the stud, a normal nut was put on behind a washer and wound up tight, the lock nut was put on after. Then there is the snapped stud and then the next nut which is corroded and looks ever so slightly loosened. I managed to get a 12mm to bite on it but it wouldn't undo. Not wanting to snap the stud, I eased it tighter until I didn't want to chance any more. Then a washer and a normal nut was put on over it. Theory here was that it would lock up and turn the stud if there was any luck left. The other nuts are not moving but appear tight to the manifold. They all look like sods to remove.
    Whilst I was under there I noticed some wiring bodgery associated with the fog lamp running off up into the depths of the engine. This car has endured a little off roading at some point and it shattered the undertray which has been fudged back together with 56 cable ties. The lower grill intake box was all loose and stuffed back in haphazardly.
    It looks like any damage was limited to exploding the underside plastics and hooking some wires on the O/S. The bottom of the rad shows some very minor crushing here but has escaped damage from whatever happened.
    I re-routed some wiring, tidied up failed insulation and applied new conduit for it to run through. Disconnected plugs, cleaned and greased the connections and secured them where they look like they should go rather than them hanging in a suspended birds nest.
    I checked the tightness of main components and the frame, a few mm was got on the steering rack but the rest appeared tight.
    Then I finally replaced the fog lamps with some special yellow items that I bought years ago and never fitted, because yellow fog lamps are for winners.
    The air intake box was then fitted properly and the remains of the undertray was correctly located and bolted up to the bumper and subframe using new hardware. It looks a lot better from the front now, instead of a load of wonky, falling down plastic and a billion clear and black cable ties, you can just barely see the heads of two bolts.
    As the exhaust blow only happens on take off, it needed to go out on the road. Immediately the car was quieter and I can accelerate with it sounding fairly good, I can hear the engine and super charger a lot clearer, making those lovely noises that they are supposed to make. Aggressive acceleration shows a blow still present though but it's not as severe by a long stretch, and perfectly usable. There appears a small blow from manifold to cat too but those nuts are solid and the studs fairly corroded and as I plan to bin all that, I'll leave it for now.
    Funny old day weather wise, causing me to fight against the waves of rain showers every hour, but with a 79% success rate, I done alright really.
    Car was treated to a tank full of momentum as I can't stand going to the Tesco station during the week, it's one of those where there's queues down the road or half the pumps work or it's just randomly closed for no reason! I'm averaging 19.9- 20mpg going about my weekly business. Double figures I'm happy with.
    It's the first tank fill up the car has had in probably 7 years so I was anticipating leaks and /or fire, but we're good.
    MOT is due this month, so I'd better get it booked in before the next thing packs up on it!

  15. Sad
    Broadsword got a reaction from timolloyd in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Things unravelled with the Rover upon digging into the FTP. First I noticed no fuel was getting through and the tank is full off rust/debris, all the way to the injector pump (so there is debris past the fuel filter). Then looking at the timing belt is has slipped and shredded partially along with the auxiliary belt. There is loud clack noise from the head when you rotate the engine by hand so there is major engine damage for sure. The little bit it did run sounded like 1 cylinder.. Anyway I need a car that I can rely on and given the Rover has already had a new head, I think some underlying issue was not figured out when it got worked on by a previous owner. It's going to get scrapped. Shame really it was spot on right up till the moment it grenaded, and was a nice drive.
     
  16. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Dave_Q in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Took the red Jag out for an extended test drive today to shake out any issues. It behaves remrkably well and the only issue that has cropped up so far (apart from the noisy release bering) is the thermostat has stuck open. I plan to take it in for an MOT ASAP.
  17. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    This weekend the Jag XJR manual went to its first show at the Motorist centre (near Sherburn in Elmet). It was a Jag meet so nice to see a decent mixture of XJs, E-types and some older stuff too. By far the strongest showing was of F-types. There must have been at least 20. There were 5-6 X300s. NLW was the only supercharged XJR6 and interestingly there was only one XJR X308. NLW felt a bit under the radar, but people gradually noticed what it was all about, which was nice. It got a big thumbs up from the Jaguar Enthusiast Club people.
    Today I was spectating at a top speed run event at Elvington Airfield. My friend was participating in his 996 flavour Porsche 911 with fresh suspension rebuild work and a fresh just run-in Hartech rebuild with a rebore to 3.7 litres. It's a tremendous car and a real credit to the owner. Apart from an undertray coming off, it didn't miss a beat and did a solid 150 mph (keep in mind you have to back off at the 1 mile marker). It then proceeded to drive us back 160 miles south in air-conditioned comfort. What a car! Check out his YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/@leeevernden
    Just before today's fun I took NLW for an early MOT. This is due to a busy calendar for the next few months and I wanted the extra check after the Powerflex fiasco. It passed with flying colours and I was happy to see it didn't struggle with emissions. Granted I put in some magic potion and got the car HOT, but I think having run it for months exclusively on V-power has been the right call.
    To top off a good day, the next project has been collected courtesy of @worldofceri. Obviosuly it's another Jag. Anyone want to guess what? Clue: what would be even better than one factory manual XJR6?
     









  18. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Interesting progress on the XJR manual. Ever since it went back on the road following the extensive rebuild, it has felt both really tight but also wayward. What with the respray and various other bits and bobs I never really investigated it in massive detail. I didn't really know where to start with the issue. When the wheels got alinged, the guy was quite cross with the car and said something was wrong. It was banging like the exhaust was knocking.
    Really it should have been very tight vis a vis the front end and steering thanks to Powerflex upper and lower wishbone bushes. Fast forward to a couple weeks ago, I discovered what you see in the video below...
    That there is your expensive Powerflex upper wishbone bushes allowing several mm lateral movement. Basically they aren't doing the job of a bushing. I couldn't believe it. A friend said he had experienced the same. I got on to Powerflex direct and they have admitted the part has been designed wrong. AND THEY ARE STILL SELLING THIS JUNK!!!
    Next step was to order some OEM front upper wishbone bushes and get them fitted pronto. Pretty exciting really because I was certain this would finally make the car drive as it should. The job took a while this weekend because I had to press the buhses in, which was a faff for an inexperieced operator but I got there in the end. Just as the sun was setting yesterday I got the Jag on the road. It was a revalation. The car is totally transformed on the road. It used to be ok in a striaght line but with an unpredicatable rear end, not as much grip as you would like, vague steering and occasional bump steer. I previously thought it was the steering rack, but I was wrong. The car has no rattles or bangs anymore (yep, the front end was banging it was that bad), I now have masses of mecahnical grip. The rear end can actually be kept in check and the steering is an absolute delight. It handles far better than a 28 year old 2 tonne RWD barge ought to. It's an absolute weapon at full throttle.
    More driving around this weekend followed by rechecking every bolt on the front end an retorque everything. Then another wheel alingment will be in order.
    The car is now running well and looks great. I can finally start to think about smaller jobs and details. One thing to address is the rubber gear lingake bushings which are known to wear out and cause a unpleasant gearshift experience. In my case first to second is not good. You can feel the lingake flexing away from you as you grab second. Should be a realtively easy fix.
    I plan to be at the Motorist near Leeds for a Jag meet April 15th to finally get the car to a show.






  19. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    After a day checking the latest Jag over, it’s on the road!
    First I had a good prod underneath to assess the rot. The special prodding tool failed to penetrate the chassis, which was nice. It’s a strange situation where the scabbiness is on top but it’s actually solid in all the right places. A good start to the day.
    Then the gear linkage. It took about an hour. I used the old bushings from NLW which were about 1000% more effective at being bushings than thin air. Suddenly the gearshift felt fantastic. It actually feels nicer than on NLW but now I realise you need that weighted knob to make it work properly. Excellent result!
    Next the clutch hydraulics. I was very suspicious of the master cylinder. Not for nothing. It was rusty on the inside. Once the old master was off I thought I’d be clever and bench bleed the brand new replacement that came with the car. I had a cap for the hard line to blank the system off while I swapped things around. Everything came off easy and bench bleeding the master was a breeze. I was expecting to be driving the car by mid afternoon. Then I realised the new master cylinder is 180 degrees out from the old one, and the line wouldn’t fit. Bugger! A trip to Halfords for some a pipe cutter and bender got me back on track. I just about managed to reroute and re-flare everything and get the system buttoned up as the sun was setting. It still needs bleeding but there was a pedal.
    I was quite happy at this point. The car up and running and on the road in a day was a good result. Initial observations: the clutch release bearing is done but the clutch and gearbox and fantastic. The engine is also amazingly good. They not all have a bit of a misfire and stuck throttle but this was fine. A bit of an exhaust blow but that is just a badly fitted centre section.
    The car actually drives well, completely contrary to its appearance. So well it might in fact pass an MOT. More prodding tomorrow but so far so good.
    I’ll have to think hard about the clutch. I don’t think I can get the gearbox in and out with my facilities. There is no way to get an OEM new clutch kit. My options are to just replace the bearing, which I can get or convert to a single mass flywheel setup so that I can install the clutch out of an XJS. I need to find someone trusted who can get the gearbox out. This is much harder than getting the bits!

     





  20. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    This is my 9th or 10th (I’ve lost count now) XJR6. I’m so in tune with these and their whereabouts through user groups and previous owners of the cars I’ve had that  they come to me now!
    This car purchase came basically out of nowhere. It’s rough but solid in all the right bits. The paint is ruined as are the front wings and wheels, but I now have a trusted place for paint and two good wings came with the car to help me along. It has a whole three days MOT left! I have the weekend to get it back up and running.
    What is the main problem? The bit I care about most of course… the gear shift feels broken and the clutch sticks. For the latter there are all new clutch hydraulics in a box on the back seat so I can sort that out easily.
    The gear shift is strange. It was as if the linkage was falling off. I had only replaced the gear linkage bushings on NLW a couple weeks ago so was able very quickly to get the centre console out for a look. The first photo is of NLW with fresh polyurethane gear linkage bushings from Simply Performance, lovely. The second is footage the red car. There are no bushings on that. I don’t quite understand how. Look at that against footage of the refreshed linkage on NLW.
     

    Finally we need to discuss the very heavy knob.  No really it seems to be pivotal to the linkage (pun intended). NLW doesn’t currently have its original gear knob. The red car does and I realise now that the knob itself is very very heavy to help with the ponderous gear shift (quote Auto Car review of the XJR6 manual in 1994). For whatever reason the linkage on the X300 manuals is flawed in some fashion so Jaguar in their infinite wisdom thought that having a approx 400 g solid steel knob would be a good fix.
     




  21. Sad
    Broadsword got a reaction from Shirley Knott in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    The fortunes in Shite are subject to rapid change. That was certainly the case today when I got a call that the Rover had expired in the middle of York. Clutch pedal jumped all the way up and the engine sounds like it's about to explode. I'll assume the DMF has grenaded without warning and taken out the clutch. Not a good start to the week.
  22. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from LightBulbFun in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    This is my 9th or 10th (I’ve lost count now) XJR6. I’m so in tune with these and their whereabouts through user groups and previous owners of the cars I’ve had that  they come to me now!
    This car purchase came basically out of nowhere. It’s rough but solid in all the right bits. The paint is ruined as are the front wings and wheels, but I now have a trusted place for paint and two good wings came with the car to help me along. It has a whole three days MOT left! I have the weekend to get it back up and running.
    What is the main problem? The bit I care about most of course… the gear shift feels broken and the clutch sticks. For the latter there are all new clutch hydraulics in a box on the back seat so I can sort that out easily.
    The gear shift is strange. It was as if the linkage was falling off. I had only replaced the gear linkage bushings on NLW a couple weeks ago so was able very quickly to get the centre console out for a look. The first photo is of NLW with fresh polyurethane gear linkage bushings from Simply Performance, lovely. The second is footage the red car. There are no bushings on that. I don’t quite understand how. Look at that against footage of the refreshed linkage on NLW.
     

    Finally we need to discuss the very heavy knob.  No really it seems to be pivotal to the linkage (pun intended). NLW doesn’t currently have its original gear knob. The red car does and I realise now that the knob itself is very very heavy to help with the ponderous gear shift (quote Auto Car review of the XJR6 manual in 1994). For whatever reason the linkage on the X300 manuals is flawed in some fashion so Jaguar in their infinite wisdom thought that having a approx 400 g solid steel knob would be a good fix.
     




  23. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from LightBulbFun in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Beauty and the beast as you can see. More details to come when I'm back home at the weekend! In the meantime check out those seats!

  24. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from LightBulbFun in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    Many thanks @worldofceri for the amazing shite delivery service.
  25. Like
    Broadsword got a reaction from LightBulbFun in Broadsword's Fleet Thread   
    This weekend the Jag XJR manual went to its first show at the Motorist centre (near Sherburn in Elmet). It was a Jag meet so nice to see a decent mixture of XJs, E-types and some older stuff too. By far the strongest showing was of F-types. There must have been at least 20. There were 5-6 X300s. NLW was the only supercharged XJR6 and interestingly there was only one XJR X308. NLW felt a bit under the radar, but people gradually noticed what it was all about, which was nice. It got a big thumbs up from the Jaguar Enthusiast Club people.
    Today I was spectating at a top speed run event at Elvington Airfield. My friend was participating in his 996 flavour Porsche 911 with fresh suspension rebuild work and a fresh just run-in Hartech rebuild with a rebore to 3.7 litres. It's a tremendous car and a real credit to the owner. Apart from an undertray coming off, it didn't miss a beat and did a solid 150 mph (keep in mind you have to back off at the 1 mile marker). It then proceeded to drive us back 160 miles south in air-conditioned comfort. What a car! Check out his YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/@leeevernden
    Just before today's fun I took NLW for an early MOT. This is due to a busy calendar for the next few months and I wanted the extra check after the Powerflex fiasco. It passed with flying colours and I was happy to see it didn't struggle with emissions. Granted I put in some magic potion and got the car HOT, but I think having run it for months exclusively on V-power has been the right call.
    To top off a good day, the next project has been collected courtesy of @worldofceri. Obviosuly it's another Jag. Anyone want to guess what? Clue: what would be even better than one factory manual XJR6?
     









×
×
  • Create New...