Jump to content

Mally

Full Members
  • Content Count

    5195
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Mally reacted to Parky in The grumpy thread   
    Not actually a grump but miracle of miracles my VISA arrived about eight hours before I was due to fly.  Unbelievable.
    As a result I now live in New Zealand - I am here now having arrived about two hours ago.  Doing two weeks managed isolation in Christchurch, after which I am free to trawl TradeMe and buy some dreadful shite.
    Heres Cathedral Square, my view for the next fortnight.  Nice room, food and drink on tap, can’t complain at all!
     

  2. Like
    Mally got a reaction from alf892 in Stupid question about truck brakes   
    I have a story from the distant past. I'm not sure if this can still happen.
    Trucker friend one day backed his cab up to an artic trailer, jumped on the back and plugged the airlines in.
    When he did this, air went into the trailer lines releasing the trailer brakes.
    Unfortunately he had not set the park brake on the truck, after he coupled up.
    Yard was on a slope, the whole unit rolled forward.
    He panicked, jumped off the back and tried to open the door and press the brakes. It crashed into a fence doing considerable damage.
    Had  he unplugged the air line that he just plugged in it would have stopped instantly.
     
     
  3. Like
    Mally reacted to sharley17194 in Sharleys Reliant Robin 1993 LX   
    So here is part 1......still not sure what ive done but i def bought a lemon!!
     
  4. Like
    Mally reacted to Rovorsche in The new news 24 thread   
    It must be fantastic stuff, it can allegedly fix the above, so it even knows how to use photoshop too.
    Unless the red picture is the After treatment!
  5. Like
    Mally reacted to Bfg in Garage Diary : Sunbeam Motorcycle resto's..   
    I did get to the bike this afternoon and although I still have one or two minor engine-oil weeps - Inspecting the bike subsequent to my 32 mile ride yesterday - I do seem to have managed to eradicate the worse cases.   I also swapped-out the distributor, cleaned the plugs and then went for another ride, via a petrol station before heading out into the low warming sun (aka ; riding off into the sunset) ..mid-Suffolk direction.  It's not a route I have been riding and so it's purely by coincidence that I did another 32.5 miles today.. 
    Having changed nothing else but the distributor - the bike is noticeable smoother between 35 and 42+ mph in top, which is where the vibration was at its worse. There's still notable vibration around 30mph in third but that's not much of an issue because it's just when I change in top anyway.  And when the bike is run-in then I'll be accelerating through that in third before a quick gear change ..either way it not detracting from the ride when pottering around.  I'm wondering if that vibration is directly related to the exceptionally light flywheel fitted to this engine ? ..you may recall I previously I wrote of it having been machined a tad too much. 
    Anyway, I'm also disappointed to report the engine pinched up / seized yet again.  It didn't happen yesterday and I hoped we were getting through that stage. In fact of all the Sunbeams I have rebuilt and subsequently run-in for their first 200 miles - this one has easily run away with the prize for it happening most frequently.    It's also always been a flipping noisy engine, but I can't honestly hazard a guess as to why it should continue to seize nor why it might be loud (it's not localised it seems to be everywhere noisy !).  Conversely I'm very pleased with the modification I did to the cylinder head gasket. I've had no issues on that front.
    I'll continue to run her in, and she'll either reveal the issue(s) by blowing up or else things might settle down or perhaps become more identifiable.  And in the meantime I'm still enjoying the rides through autumnal colours and Suffolk's beautiful rolling countryside with architectural gems.  
     

      ^ no,  the bike's not parked outside my studio apartment ..
    ..it's Hindlesham Hall, Suffolk.. Hotel, Restaurant, and Spa
    Bidding you a good evening,
    Pete
  6. Like
    Mally reacted to Bfg in Garage Diary : Sunbeam Motorcycle resto's..   
    Mid -week update ;  The bike's running-in is going reasonably well but, as always, slower than planned due to my not taking into consideration ; days off, time taken for re-torquing and sorting out various minor but annoying issues, wet weather, short daylight hours and generally my mindset / laziness in getting out there to do the job.  The tacho read 8126 when I first fitted Pudge's rebuilt engine in September and it's now 8389 miles.  I'd ridden just 26 before, and during, moving home  ..and between a-week-on-Sunday and yesterday (nine days) we've covered another 237 miles. That's half of what my target was, but Hey., with my present state of mind - it's been better to have achieved half than to not have set a target and have achieved nothing.!
    And as you might gather from the recent piccies - it has on the whole been very pleasant.  I rode 77 miles on Friday, up to 50+mph speeds on the A140 and across on the A143 to the aero museum, near Bungay,  and then on the way back found myself on a long upwards incline on a road I couldn't safely go slower on.  The engine seized again and was reluctant to restart.  Thereafter she wasn't happy - but did get me home.  When I got back there was oil all over the place ..from places I'd never seen on these bikes before (that is.. all at one time) such as the front crankshaft oil-seal (into the dynamo) and also the seal to / through the distributor.  The rocker-cover nuts were also weeping as was the crankcase breather cap. There was oil around the spark-plug holes and the tailpipe of the exhaust was also wet with black sooty oil. The spark-plugs were glistening with oil ..which possibly accounted for poor running. These symptoms point to valve-guide failure ..whose job it is - to keep the oil in the engine rather than being sucked into the combustion chamber (via the inlet valve-guide) or through the exhaust (via the exhaust valve guides).
    I took the weekend off ..in part due to wet weather but mostly because I was upset to think the engine had to come apart again.  History ;  On another Sunbeam engine I had used Scholar Engines to replace the sintered-iron valve-guides ..and they cracked them during fitting.  We had 'words' (..not for the first time) and I said (to myself) that I'd not use that company again ..but I had.  On this engine I'd had them make and fit bronze valve-guides (more expensive but self-lubricating and unlikely to crack). Unfortunately when I saw the job I was disappointed that the valve-in-its-guide tolerances were rather slack.  
    After the weekend sleeping on the issues / thinking over the symptoms and possible causes - I had hope to think that the valve-guides may in part be at fault but that was not all there was to it.  Even cracked valve-guides wouldn't have accounted for the excess crankcase pressure - which was forcing engine-oil out passed what ought to be good seals.  However the converse, ie., excess crankcase pressure would push oil through relatively slack fitting valve-guides.   So on Monday I went to the Tardis, pulled the bike out and did a compression test. 

    ^ I started the bike with both plugs in as usual and warmed the engine. This makes the bike easier to start on just one cylinder ..when a plug is out and replaced with the compression tester.   The readings were low but on the other hand were the same for both cylinders.  So that means - the wicking Loctite I'd used around the rear cylinder's replaced liner had worked to seal that gap ..and we were not loosing compression passed the sleeve into the crankcase ..which in turn would have built up excessive pressure and caused the engine-oil to weep out of anywhere it could.   Btw., low compression and higher crankcase pressure goes with piston rings and their bores not having yet bedded in.
    So then I reckoned on checking other things and in particular paying attention to the crankcase breather.  With the bike back inside, it was off with the petrol tank and rocker cover. .

    ^ I'd moved Pudge and the bike lift out of here and into the farmer's big shed - so that I had some space to work on the bike, but even with the bike moved over to one side there's not a whole lot of room for someone of my size to get in there and work.  Nevertheless it's as good as I have ..so I had to get on with it !
    .      .
    My handy swiveling office chair (less backrest) is easier than having to constantly bend over or else be down on my knees. 
     
    The inside of the rocker cover was reworked a little insomuch as it was a rough cast finish. And as you might just make out from the previous (open rocker cover) photo - I use a rubber grommet on each of studs, as seals under the cover.  It's not standard ..just another one of those little Peter-mods, but of course the roughness of a casting around the holes couldn't hope to be oil-tight seal - so I locally smoothed the casting off . . .

    ^ I also swapped the fibre washer I use under these nuts for a larger one (20mm OD opened to 3/8" ID) and also ensured the top of cover, around the holes was both flat and level.  These should have been done during the engine's rebuild but on that occasion I had been against a deadline to move house and I knew this sort of detail could wait.  While in there I checked the valve clearances, which ought to be 0.018" on these engines, and three of the four valves were a tad too open. Another task - quickly addressed.
    The main thing I wanted to redress though was my crankcase's breather pipe, which is taken from the cap on the front of the rocker cover.  Here I hoped might be the cause of my high crankcase-pressure woes.  The incongruous sharp-edged cap is an add-on from Stewart Engineering, as the original (1940's Sunbeam) scheme was to breath the crankcase-air through an open cover on the front of the rocker cover  ..which would then splatter crankcase oil mist and emulsified oil-moisture down and over the front of the engine. ! ?
    Sunbeam's design is to have three disc-valves (one-way valves) through the front of the cover which allow more air out of the crankcase than into it. It's not 100% but it as long as they are in good order then they are sufficient to create lesser than atmospheric pressure inside - which in turn minimises the amount of oil being pushed out passed seals and gaskets.    Some time ago I bought some neat little plastic in-line valves which I put into the breather pipe.  They have worked well in the past and so it was done on this engine. However I suspected my mistake was in fitting it just a couple of inches away from the disc-valves, whereby at certain engine revs - the two valve's pressure waves conflicted ..And so instead of creating a negative crankcase-air pressure they conspired to do the opposite.  It's just a theory but one which was easily altered, simply by moving the two valves systems away from each other. .

    ^ the old and hardened plastic breather pipe replaced with this clear flexible pipe, and the in-line one-way valve has been moved way down (27" away). from there the black pipe goes into a plastic catch tank that I Velcro to the frame (tucked away behind the exhaust down pipes).  Naturally the breather pipe was likewise tucked away behind the frame.
    There were a number of other jobs done, not least re-torquing the cylinder head down, replacing an ill fitting petrol pipe and the likes, replaced a gasket to the rear inspection cover, and readjusted the rear engine head steady ..but nothing much to talk about. Thereafter (yesterday) I took the bike for a 32 mile run.  I haven't closely inspected the bike since I got back for oil leaks but, if there are any, they weren't noticeable when putting the bike back inside at dusk.  She was running sort-of OK but is still vibrating more than I might hope and has an occasional misfire ..so today the plan is to swap out the distributor for another and to try that.
    So that's it for today.. I think the high crankcase pressure issue may have been most resolved (..more by luck than anything perhaps) but of course until the bores are run in then it will still be a little higher than usual.  Time will tell if it settles down well with another distributor or whether I need to change the carburettor too.?
     
     
    ^ Yesterday was heavy low cloud but the rain held off.  On the way back I stopped to buy some scrumptiously-huge Bramley cooking-apples at this little Suffolk cottage.  £1 a bag.
    That's it for now as I've got to get going, so I'll bid you a good day.
    Pete.
     
    edit.  I was just checking my grammar and spotted a modification that someone (else) has done to the rocker cover ..

    ^ the three holes drilled through the transverse baffle (yellow arrows but more clearly seen in the RH photo) - should NOT be there.  I've come across this once before on a customer's bike, and it's wrong because the oil splash from the timing chain (located behind that baffle) is blown through the holes into the rocker-cover chamber.  Whereas the crankcase-air's pressure-wave should be coming up via the drain hole by the camshaft. This (pulsating crankcase air) blows draining engine-oil back over the camshaft's lobes and then there is a steel-plate baffle above the camshaft itself to lessen the amount of oil mist over the rocker arms ..where the valve-guides are and the breather vent.  In short, if there's a flood of oil in there then more oil will come through the valve guides and that then will be seen in the combustion chamber and exhaust silencer.  So those holes need to be filled in.
     
  7. Like
    Mally reacted to Stanky in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    I have also done that!
  8. Haha
    Mally got a reaction from Eyersey1234 in Austin 1300 (ADO 16) Estate. Actual garage Find. Edinburgh. Taken away.   
    Worth picking up for the engines alone if you live local.
    If you are distant the engine may be the only thing on your trailer when you arrive home.
  9. Haha
    Mally got a reaction from tooSavvy in Austin 1300 (ADO 16) Estate. Actual garage Find. Edinburgh. Taken away.   
    @SiC gave it a good go.
    Then bought one that was finished.
  10. Like
    Mally reacted to TripleRich in 1975 Ford Granada Coupe - 1332 hours of work - Getting close now   
    I've also got the engine back.  The block has been acid dipped and bored out to +1mm.  It certainly looks a lot better than it did a few months ago.
    Gave it a lick of paint.  Factory colour for these in 75 was black for just about everything.  I'm painting the bits separately so stuff like core plugs and bolts stand out.  Looks a little more interesting/professional than a big lump of gloss black.

    Changed the crank gear to this new one as I have a matched replacement timing wheel to go with it.

    Crank, bearings and caps installed

    Replaced the camshaft.  The old one is worn and rusty from years of storage.

    Pistons installed making sure everything is torqued up and freely rotating.  Cam & thrust plate installed too.

    New replacement timing gear installed.  I've chosen the standard fiber type.  Worked on plenty of essex/colognes with steel timing gears fitted.  Although more reliable I personally can't stand the god awful whine/racket they make.

    Timing cover & water pump.  Genuine ford water pump and thermostat has been used.  I tested the thermostat before fitting it.

    Completed timing cover.  Most of the bolts have been replaced where possible.

    New core plugs.

    New oil pump & sump gasket fitted.  The oil pump strainer took a while to get clean but it should be fine now.

    Cleaned up the heads.  These were re-machined years ago.  They have some slight corrosion from storage but I was able to sort them out.

    Valves installation completed.

    Tappets, guide sleeves and head gaskets in place.

    Heads fitted and torqued down.  New core plugs also fitted.

    Rocker gear cleaned, lubricated and fitted.

    Inlet manifold fitted and torqued down.

    Plenty left to do but I'm very pleased with the progress.  Going together well and it's turning over nicely.  One of the tappets is a little sticky so will bear that in mind if I have any issues.  I expect it will all settle down once its run for a while.  Many parts left to fit and quite a bit of time in cleaning & painting.  Its a 45 year old engine so almost every part needs some attention before fitting.
    Forgot just how heavy these are.  Explains why the car sits so high at the front without an engine.  
  11. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Joey spud in Boris the '59 Minor.   
    Yes stick with that, it's much better than mine.
    Mine also has fibreglass front wings, I don't like them, but they are staying on.
  12. Like
    Mally reacted to lesapandre in Halloween - The Night of the Zombie Cars Companies   
    So you thought it was dead - everybody said so. Closed down in 19-- and no more being produced. Think again - look behind you, there could be something still moving there in the Automotive Graveyard.
    They stopped making them around 1956 but the Lanchester Motor Company is still in existance...dead and kicking...

     What fiendishly new model might they have under development, what brown- coated prof's are concocting the rejuvenated corpse  for embalmed Homburg-hatted owners?  Write off for a catalogue...c/o JLR Whitley who would be delighted to hear from you...

    Lanchester too small - how about about something bigger and even more frightening...  Packard - dead since 1958. 

    Or so you thought...don't look behind you.. 

    To be continued....

  13. Like
    Mally reacted to Bfg in Garage Diary : Sunbeam Motorcycle resto's..   
    ..It's been a long time since I was here..  Far too much has happened since June, starting off from the 27th May when totally out-of-the-blue my landlady gave me notice to leave.  No fault on my part, it was just her brother decided he wanted to live where I was.  But my moving house n' home on my own (due to the pandemic) and to a deadline was both exhausting and stressful.  I had been there (that home) for over sixteen years and with having to clear the garage and everything else - it was a massive upheaval.  Because of my financial position it also meant downsizing from a spacious home with garage and two sheds to ending up in a studio apartment + a 20ft shipping container < here >.
    On the bike front ;

    Katie was put up for sale < here > and thankfully (only because I needed the money) was sold to a great lad from down in Dorset.  Her Dynamo went back to Robson and Francis five times I think and still it beat them. The buyer was kept informed of the issue and in the end decided to buy her as it was, and then to have it (the dynamo) sorted out locally.
    Nudge was hurriedly put on the road, but with Pudge's engine in her.  That engine-fitting was done before the having-to-move shit hit the fan, and was decided upon because the original plan was to run-in that engine using Nudge ..because Pudge has freshly repainted frame and panels - and I didn't want to scratch them ..should the tank have to be lifted off and/or the engine needs to come out again, which with 70 year old mechanicals can happen.

    ^ Nudge  a London registered 1953 Sunbeam S8 (skinny wheels) is now reassembled as my 'daily-rider', but with moving house - I've only done about 50 miles on her since Pudge 's engine was rebuilt and fitted.  Unfortunately above 35 mph the bike / engine has an odd vibration and I simply haven't had the opportunity to try and identify why that might be.  The feeling is reminiscent of a when Nudge 's own engine had a broken big-end / conrod bolt, so until I have a chance to drop the sump and check that out - the bike is under wraps in storage.
     
    And Pudge 's forks and rear suspension were hurriedly rebuilt and refitted, so that she was at least a rolling cycle and therefore easier to move . . .

    ^ Pudge,  also from 1953, is a Sunbeam S7-deluxe (with fat tyres) and so is big sister bike to Nudge.  She was first registered in the same borough of London just five weeks before Nudge, indeed it was on the day after the Queen's Coronation which probably accounts for both being painted the silver metallic colour.  This colour was standard on the S8 but is almost unheard of on an S7-deluxe ..which were usually a light pea-green colour, or black by special order.  Subsequent to the above photo I've now also reassembled her cantilever saddle mechanism.   
    I no longer have this spacious home ..with the bike's restoration slowly happening in the front room, and now - especially as the weather is damp & cooler, and the days are shorter - I'm struggling with self-motivation to get on with jobs.  My new working space is now just a narrow 4' x 8'-6" in the end of a 20ft shipping container, with a 12v battery and LED lights as there's no mains power . . .  so I have to side step around the bike.  Still I did build in a bench and almost everything from the old garage is squeezed in here, so - if I can find it ! - I ought to have the tools and parts to do the reassembly.   Without excuses it's now just a matter of getting off my arse and getting my mind back into a positive moving-forward mode.   
    On Thursday I did just that, with the intent to starting the rewiring.  Doing that (rewiring) now is a little odd, before the engine is in and the rest of the bike (mudguards and headlamp shell, etc) have been reassembled ..but I thought it would be a steady sort of job to get my mind back into gear.  Firstly though I felt the urge to paint inside the bike's 'electrical boxes' while they were still empty . . .
    This particular bike is unique insomuch as so many of the parts had been chrome plated.  I don't know when this was done, whether it was part of dressing her up beautifully for the Coronation or else it was a subsequent customisation.  I do know that to do so involved stripping the whole bike down with engine out, and then also many brackets and all the electrics removed.  Other than that I only know that it was done before the bike was bought by and used as a studio prop by Mike Prior Photography in the 1980's.

     
    The condition of many of those chromed parts was a little rough (pitted &/or dented) and so I'd had some (..unfortunately in retrospect - not all) of them re-chromed.  The problem with chrome plating is that the insides of a box don't get the same protective coating as the outsides, indeed acid dip cleaner tends to sit inside the corners and under brackets and then rust the item from the insides.  Anyone who had a chromed exhaust silencer may be familiar with this problem. 

    ^ the above shows (from left to right) the tank's knee pad mounting plates, the tool box, the electrical box, the battery box and the lid of the tool box. The tool box's chrome was OK so only its lid was re-chromed but still, the inside of box had surface corrosion.
    With wire wool and wire-brush heads of different configuration on a cordless drill, I subsequently cleaned the rust and looser plating out of these and painted them.

    ^ I used a little more of the POR-15 petrol tank sealant paint I had left over (which I'd bought when living in the US some 20+ years ago !). The paint is sort of metallic silver and is probably twice as thick as it used to be. Applying it with a paint brush was clearly going to look horrid so I dolloped out the paint and used my finger to wipe it around and into any pitting. That worked amazingly well and I'm quite pleased with the final finish of this protective coating ..bearing in mind it's only inside the boxes which will have a battery or wiring stuffed inside them. 
    As an aside you can see in this piccie my little workbench.  My old camping stove provided me with a cup of coffee, and then - using a stainless steel snack-tray for heat dissipation., a little warmth too.  Not quite home from home but I know that a few comforts like these help my motivation.
     
    So there you go, really not much news at all but I'm hoping my posting updates on here will help me get back into the routine of steadily doing jobs and recording progress ..And that'll help with boosting the ol' mojo.
    Bidding you an enjoyable and possibly productive weekend.
    Pete.
  14. Haha
    Mally reacted to HillmanImp in MOT tests to be extended by 6 months, if due from 30 March   
    Guilty as charged
  15. Haha
    Mally reacted to loserone in What makes you grin? Antidote to grumpy thread   
    We've just bought our kids a clock where you can set a daytime / nighttime colour change time, so they can watch the pictures of moon and see how long they need to stay in bed. 
     
    The four year old got up yesterday and ran around the upstairs shouting "only one moon left, it's nearly time to get up but I must go back to bed!"  This woke the two year old who then needed breakfast.
  16. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Zie in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    They thought it was all over......Extra meeting Kings Lynn ,Sun 8 November.   Afternoon, and big  F1  meeting,  so all good to me.  Never say never.
  17. Like
    Mally got a reaction from gm in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Got car back from painting 4-30 pm   Thursday, worked on it till 9pm, changed diff and put new wheels on, odds and sods.
    I started at 9am making spare bits, so a 12 hour day. I usually only do 3 or 4 now.
    As reported on grumpy thread, went home turned on the hot water tap and left it running for 10 hours!
    This morning, (friday) started 7-30 am. One of the new tyres was flat, put another tube in. Fit dash and gauges, wire it all up, fit engine stop cable and mirror.
    Exhaust pipe and silencer, a few body panels, Afternoon run it outside, tyre pressures, set up chassis height castor, camber, axle stagger. Weigh it.
    At this point water started dripping from back of engine, temp sender. It's all brand new parts!
    Not the easiest thing to mess with, was all tight but wouldn't seal, eventually manage to stop it for now.
    Brakes spongy, bleed and test. Stopped fine, wouldn't set off again rear brakes stuck on.
    There a brake bias valve, decrease and increase rear brakes with a lever. Undid the brake pipe, gush of fluid, brakes free.
    Valve is correct way round according to arrow.
    It's 10 to 5. Ring Rob Mitchell, TMR, supplier of valve, he finishes at 5. It's an hour away.
    I'll set off now and meet you half way. Good man.
    Fitted replacement lever, all good. Finished 6-30 pm. Only 11 hours today.
    Long weekend Sat/Sun. They are in the Van, first time in this van, kids are excited. I've got a Travelodge for £25.
    Always hard work  2 meetings I'll be knackered by Monday. Let you know how it goes, or doesn't.

     

     

  18. Like
    Mally got a reaction from timolloyd in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Sept 26, cancelled rained off.
    Meeting report Northampton 24 October. Last shale meeting of the season.
    Called at Lyndale engines on the way for a rolling road session. They build engines and rolling road test them. Our engine is much cheaper build,but not tested.
    He said max you can get within the rules is 170 bhp. Ours was 164 first go. Swopped a couple of carb jets, 167 bhp.
    Said that's it. You will get the other 3 bhp by removing the fan and fitting an electric one, but it will then run hot, so best leave it alone.
    Charged us £80, cheapest we have ever had, spent around an hour and a half in total.
    Very wet track, went worse as the night went on, should have cancelled this one really.
    Heat 1, 3rd.   Heat 2, 2nd.   Final, put in the mud by Dave Polley early on. Two laps behind when he got going again. Finished in 4th place, which gives you an idea of the problems the others were having.
    Grand National  cancelled because no cars would turn out.
    Absolute  mud bath  all night. Won £20. spent £120 on fuel £80 rolling road £50 pub lunch.
    There may be a meeting around  Xmas, but with any luck I'm in Benidorm.
    Start again next March. Not doing many meetings next year he says. Definitely last season. Third year he's said that, but likely to happen now,
    Little to do except wash it. Will spend next 4 months tidying the garage, it needs it.
    Even I've had enough. 54 years involved with racing is enough for anyone.
    But if I'm still around in 3 years time the Granddaughters having a go.
  19. Like
    Mally got a reaction from MKT in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    They thought it was all over......Extra meeting Kings Lynn ,Sun 8 November.   Afternoon, and big  F1  meeting,  so all good to me.  Never say never.
  20. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Mrs6C in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Track is at Brafield, NN7 2BA. Sat 26 th September 5pm.
    Unfortunately due to Covid it's pre booked tickets only, and crowd is kept separate from the drivers.
    In normal times you just roll up and roam anywhere.
    Basically a field in the middle of nowhere, was great in the sun shine, but can be very wet and cold at times. Viewing is good though.
    Anyone on f/b, which I'm not a great fan of, but it's useful at times.
    You can join ' #lovef2s'.  They often feature videos of the races, sometimes live with commentary when permitted.
  21. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Mrs6C in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    They thought it was all over......Extra meeting Kings Lynn ,Sun 8 November.   Afternoon, and big  F1  meeting,  so all good to me.  Never say never.
  22. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Mrs6C in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    Sept 26, cancelled rained off.
    Meeting report Northampton 24 October. Last shale meeting of the season.
    Called at Lyndale engines on the way for a rolling road session. They build engines and rolling road test them. Our engine is much cheaper build,but not tested.
    He said max you can get within the rules is 170 bhp. Ours was 164 first go. Swopped a couple of carb jets, 167 bhp.
    Said that's it. You will get the other 3 bhp by removing the fan and fitting an electric one, but it will then run hot, so best leave it alone.
    Charged us £80, cheapest we have ever had, spent around an hour and a half in total.
    Very wet track, went worse as the night went on, should have cancelled this one really.
    Heat 1, 3rd.   Heat 2, 2nd.   Final, put in the mud by Dave Polley early on. Two laps behind when he got going again. Finished in 4th place, which gives you an idea of the problems the others were having.
    Grand National  cancelled because no cars would turn out.
    Absolute  mud bath  all night. Won £20. spent £120 on fuel £80 rolling road £50 pub lunch.
    There may be a meeting around  Xmas, but with any luck I'm in Benidorm.
    Start again next March. Not doing many meetings next year he says. Definitely last season. Third year he's said that, but likely to happen now,
    Little to do except wash it. Will spend next 4 months tidying the garage, it needs it.
    Even I've had enough. 54 years involved with racing is enough for anyone.
    But if I'm still around in 3 years time the Granddaughters having a go.
  23. Like
    Mally got a reaction from Jenson Velcro in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    They thought it was all over......Extra meeting Kings Lynn ,Sun 8 November.   Afternoon, and big  F1  meeting,  so all good to me.  Never say never.
  24. Like
    Mally got a reaction from mjrose78 in Mally's Stock Cars, Bikes,Life and Minor events.   
    They thought it was all over......Extra meeting Kings Lynn ,Sun 8 November.   Afternoon, and big  F1  meeting,  so all good to me.  Never say never.
  25. Like
    Mally reacted to Dave_Q in Dave's shonkers - GSXR fixage   
    Have barely had anything to say here as we've spent the last year building some house.
    Van has kept on vanning, no issues since the starter stuff earlier this year. It did have a couple of tyres and front brake pads advisoried at MOT so I did those before we went on holiday.
    Also did the cambelt which ended up being a medium-high faff as I struggled to get the crank bolt out, turns out they are threadlocked in and it needed some heat and a new,bigger ugga dugga gun. After all that, the cambelt that was on it was dated 2015 so it didn't even really need doing. My heat gun also did some alarming self immolation in the process.

    As the house stuff is starting to calm down slightly I decided to do something about my poor motorbike which had spent several months languishing in the back garden:

    I took the carbs off a while ago to try and fix the chokes but never finished the job. One of the retaining bolts for the choke snapped off and I made a poor job of drilling it out.
    I did offer it up on here but understandably didn't get much interest as a non-runner. I have now bodged the carbs back together and got it running again, it's booked in for MOT on Friday.

×
×
  • Create New...